Diabetes in Scotland

Diabetes in Scotland affects over 228,000 people
Diabetes in Scotland affects over 228,000 people

Diabetes affects one in twenty-five people in Scotland, according to current statistics. That’s over 228,000 people.

Meanwhile, the figure could be as high as 250,000 as it is estimated that 20,000 people in Scotland remain undiagnosed. [A]

As in many countries, type 2 diabetes is rapidly increasing in Scotland and accounts for about 87% of diabetes in Scotland.

Obesity accounts for 80% of Scottish people with type 2 diabetes, according to the latest ‘Scottish Diabetes Survey’ (2009).

People with type 1 diabetes account for about 12% of the diabetic population and other diabetes types account for 0.6%. [B]

Blood glucose control in Scotland

Approximately 70% of people with type 2 diabetes have an HbA1c of 7.5% or under.

For people with type 1 diabetes, approximately 25% have an HbA1c of 7.5% or under whereas about 44% have an HbA1c value of over 9%. [B]

Insulin pumps

Insulin pump usage in Scotland currently stands at only 2%.

Charities such as Diabetes UK and the JDRF have been campaigning for wider availability of insulin pumps.

The Scottish Diabetes Action Plan 2010 commits to make “significant and sustained progress” to increase access to insulin pump therapy over the next three years.

Self-testing for type 2 diabetics

In March 2010 the NHS National Institute for Health Research published report which concluded that self-monitoring of blood glucose levels for people with type 2 diabetes is unlikely to be cost effectiveness in improving their blood sugar control.

The report makes for disappointing reading among those type 2 diabetics who rely on regular blood testing to manage their diabetes. [C]

Diabetes research in Scotland

Diabetes research in Scotland involves a new state-of-the-art diabetes research centre opened at the Perth Royal Infirmary in August as well as the DNA of Scottish type 1 diabetics being used to further research into understanding of the development of the condition and its associated complications.

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