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Any idea on amount of fat loss needed to reverse prediabetes? (and a little about myself)

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by NonStop, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. NonStop

    NonStop · Member

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    Hello all. So last Friday I was diagnosed with prediabetes - 6.1mmol/L fasting plasma glucose. I've been reading a lot about prediabetes/diabetes for a while (see below if you're interested) and I'm particularly interested in the Newcastle diet, or rather fat loss to reverse diabetes. It seems that the studies at Newcastle university seems to be very positive and after looking at the prediabetes page on the website here it seems that fat loss is of large importance to prediabetes too.

    So my main query is how much fat have people had to lose to get rid of their prediabetes?

    I'd also appreciate it if people let me know their thoughts on how I plan to attack my prediabates.
    I intend to spend the first 6 months of 2017 on fat loss. I have always had a fairly decent body fat %, around 17%, I reckon and I always do a few days a week of resistance training (which I will continue). However, it wouldn't hurt to lose a stone of fat, so thats my first priority, especially if I can reverse my prediabetes on a not so restrictive diet. I intend to keep my carbs a little bit restricted, probably around 150g net carbs, maybe a little more or less. Yet my main focus will be maintaining a calorific deficit to create fat loss.

    However, if fat loss fails to make much of a dent in my prediabetes, I will probably go to the other extreme and try a ketogenic diet. This is the second choice as I'd like to have a less restrictive diet, and my mind hasn't been made up on the implications of maintaining a ketogenic diet for years to come (I've had problems with insomnia and low-carb dieting before).

    So there you have it. To also help make things easier, I'll be in a new job in January which is fairly active (I've been very inactive over the last 2 months except for resistance training). I'm also switching from beer to red wine/spirits in the long run to help reduce calories/carbs/alcohol, and in addition I think I'm going to try dry-January just to help with the diet.

    Let me know your thoughts and thanks in advance!
     
  2. chalup

    chalup Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome. I think the amount of fat loss needed is a very individual thing and there is really no answer to your question. All you can really do is lose weight and see where it takes you. Good luck.
     
  3. Hiitsme

    Hiitsme Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @NonStop and welcome
    I will tag @daisy1 who will post some good info for newbies.
    I was diagnosed with a fasting reading of 18 and a very high HbA1c. I also did a lot of reading and was very interested in the Newcastle studies. My GP wouldn't support me to do the Newcastle diet so I did my own way of losing weight. I tried to eat 500 cals less than I was burning each day. As my blood sugars were so high I also worked out which foods my body couldn't cope with by testing and cut out those foods. So a double angle approach. I was losing about 1 to 2 lbs a week on this. My BMI went from 25 down to 19.6 and was then told by GP to put on weight. Even having put on some weight I still think I have ended up with some control though I'm not sure I have reversed it but do think I have it under control. I would suggest getting a meter and testing so see what different foods do to your body. Testing before a meal and 2 hours after. I'm sure that helped me but then my numbers were far higher than yours.
     
  4. bruciebonus

    bruciebonus Type 2 · Active Member

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    Everyone is different, Just loose weight and keep testing,
     
  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @NonStop

    Hello NonStop and welcome to the forum :) To help you, here is the basic information we give to new members which I hope you will find helpful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will come along and help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  6. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    From the man himself...
    http://www.sciencealert.com/losing-just-1-gram-of-fat-in-the-pancreas-can-reverse-type-2-diabetes
    All the best to your quest.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #6 kokhongw, Dec 28, 2016 at 8:55 AM
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2016
  7. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    H welcome you obviously know about low carb as you have done it before so not much we can tell you about that so just do what you think will work for you. We are all different so what works for one does not always work for another and we all have to find our own best way.
     
  8. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I believe the percentage is circa 15% of your diagnosed weight to loose. Maybe this can be less if you add muscle bulk at the same time as draining fat, so obviously not moving the scales as much. You might if affordable / desirable wish to arm yourself with some WiFi scales (I use a Withings, although Fitbit and others do some). The scales would show you amongst other readings, fat mass, so you could monitor change over time.
     
  9. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Trouble is, though we can set out to loose weight, we cannot determine exactly what and where that weight will be culled, our auto-metabolic function decides that. I have lost 20% of my weight, but it appears the 'wrong' 20% for me
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. Juicetin

    Juicetin Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I have lost 15% of my body weight (14.5stone down to 12 and a bit) and it has made no difference to my blood sugar. I'm low carbing around 100g a day (tried and failed to do lower) and doing lots of cardio exercise. When my shoulder heals I will attempt some resistance training in the new year.
    As people have said, everyone's body is different, I know a chap almost identical circumstances to me, he lost the same amount of weight, ate even more carbs and did a lot of cycling and his A1C dropped 10 points lower than mine in the same time frame.
     
  11. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

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    Some great advice from the others. Everyone is different, but as you are only marginally in the pre-diabetic range with a FBG of 6.1 it should be easy enough for you to control.

    Personally I lost about 33% of my body weight (BMI down from 31 to 21) and have maintained this BMI for over 2 years but throughout this 2 years I was in the pre-diabetic range. My last HbA1c was just inside the non-diabetic range, so it has taken me a long time and although I have always been medication-free I do not consider myself reversed in any way. Just well controlled.
     
  12. seadragon

    seadragon Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Seems like a case of 'suck it and see' since some people don't seem to need to lose much and others lose lots and it doesn't really help. I was diagnosed as pre-diabetic and then I lost over 10% of bodyweight (although not classed as overweight at the time (BMI 25). Did this through a low carb diet which gave me so much energy I took up running. I also now do weight training. My HbA1c is now well within normal range but I still have a diabetic response to carbs and would probably fail a GTT test and also have high FBG which seems to be due to morning liver dumps as it is not usually the lowest BG reading of the day (contrary to what most of the medical profession will tell you). This is why it is so important to have a meter and use it. I can be down in the mid 4's late afternoon. The low carbing has however stopped all other symptoms in their tracks - no longer get night sweats or feel fatigued or need that after lunch nap or a multitude of other minor ailments.
     
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  13. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As I understand it we all have a personal fat threshold, which we need to try to breach, for me going from 98 kg to 86 made a massive impact. I did focus more on cardio and weights than weight loss per se. I went for a throw the kitchen sink at this condition, some are able to get great results via diet alone.
     
  14. Enclave

    Enclave Type 2 (in remission!) · Moderator
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    I lost 6st but only on the low carb way of eating ... 20g of carbs a day and normal fat .... it got my diabetes in remission .. years ago I tried the low calorie way of eating and it did not work as I was hungry all the time
     
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  15. serenity648

    serenity648 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have lost only a few pounds, but my diabetes is in remission. I have a LOT of weight to lose, and a few pounds is an insignificant amount for me overall.

    I dont think its the weight loss which lowers blood sugars. I think its the new way of eating, the reduction of carbs and low fat foods, which make blood sugars come down.
     
  16. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My problem was I spent many many years not being hungry.
    Way too many years.
    So, when I bit the bullet, and realised being morbidly obese wasn't good for me, it wasn't too hard to lose weight, accept I had to suck up being hungry for a while, lose 25% of my body weight, and come out of the other side with my diabetes in remission.
    And by 'remission', I mean I can eat any diet, not just low carb.
     
    • Winner Winner x 2
  17. dm2-one

    dm2-one Type 2 · Member

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  18. NonStop

    NonStop · Member

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    Not from what I've read from Dr Taylor; "The essential point is that substantial weight loss must be achieved. The time course of weight loss is much less important." - http://www.ncl.ac.uk/media/wwwnclac...re/files/reversing-type2-diabetes-leaflet.pdf

    And again; "You don’t have to take such extreme measures as a 700-calorie diet, though, both doctors say. As long as you lose about 15 percent of your body weight, you may be able to reverse your diabetes, Dr. Taylor says." - http://www.menshealth.com/health/how-to-cure-diabetes

    You can take your time reversing prediabetes/type 2 diabates.
     
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  19. serenity648

    serenity648 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I have lost around 5% of my body weight and reversed my diabetes.

    In my case, itts the low carbing which did it, not the weight loss.
     
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  20. douglas99

    douglas99 I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So you can now eat carbs, and eat high amounts of them?
     
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