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can anyone help ? Worried mum of a type 1

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by mossy71, Nov 1, 2017.

  1. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Honestly I'm not sure how you can say that with any degree of accuracy given the information provided. The mom said he was drinking heavily.
     
  2. mossy71

    mossy71 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you he is fine now although trying to make sense of it all, still can’t remember a thing about what happened, I’ve seen him the worse for wear drinking before but this was on a different level
     
  3. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    Regarding your son speaking in a foreign accent, I think he should visit his GP (perhaps with you to accompany him to explain what you witnessed). There is a condition called 'foreign accent syndrome' which can occur as a result of neurological damage. Most cases are not transient and seem to be caused by head injury or stroke but it might be possible that hypoglycaemia could have a similar effect. On the other hand, your GP might want to rule out a tumour. It would be wise to get it documented in case it happens again.
    http://www.speechdisorder.co.uk/dysprosody.html

    If someone with type 1 diabetes is uncharacteristically aggressive, hypoglycaemia should be the first consideration. There is information from St John's ambulance about recognising and treating hypoglycaemia here:-
    http://www.sja.org.uk/sja/first-aid-advice/illnesses-and-conditions/diabetic-emergency.aspx
     
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  4. mossy71

    mossy71 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you very much for this information and taking time to reply to my post
     
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  5. DigitalMercenary

    DigitalMercenary Type 1 · Newbie

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    So sorry to hear about your son's problems.

    I've been a T1 for 43 years now.
    When I have hypoglycaemia, and this goes way back to my teenage days, I every other time get really aggressive and violent.

    Me and my wife lived in the US for 10 years, and I have had numerous encounters with cops there. But they were always trying to help (even if that meant handcuffing me and holding me down on the ground while I was yelling, flaying about and trying to punch them in the face).
    The adrenaline level when I have hypo is at times extreme and adding to my completely non cooperative state (and "drunken" state), it's a recipe for disaster.
    I also don't remember much of my hypo incidents. Sometimes nothing at all.

    What I am trying to say is that the combination of T1 and alcohol is really really bad. Trust me, I know first hand.
    You numb your senses with alcohol, and once the hypoglycaemia starts you are less likely to notice the signs, the effects of it are going to be enhanced by your drunken state, and the peolpe around you are going to be confused to wether you're drunk, having hypoglycaemia, or both.

    The bottom line I think is that you have to be really careful with your blood sugar if you are going to drink alcohol. Prep with carbs and monitor continuously (and if possible, have someone else keep an eye on you).
     
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  6. mossy71

    mossy71 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you! I usually keep an eye on him myself but I too had had a drink I knew he had done insulin and eaten then my daughter turned up so I was a bit preoccupied ! This had completely put him off drinking and had sworn off it altogether ! Whilst I know at his age that’s not going to last fore ever I’m happy with his decision for the foreseeable future !
    I’m glad the police were helpful in your case, we live and learn I guess I just hope he doesn’t get into too much trouble!!
     
  7. Salvia

    Salvia Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry for your troubles, @mossy71, hope things are being resolved now. I must stress I know nothing at all about type 1 diabetes, nor insulin/glucose regimes, so cannot comment on any aspectof that.

    Just a couple of points strike me - and fully my own point of view: a) is there anyone who can verify what, and how much, your son drank that day/night? b) you say that having called the police, when you went back to the lounge your son got up to give you a hug (are you sure that was his intent?) (presumably he wasn't very steady on his feet at the time?), and that somehow things then went pear-shaped. Neither you nor your husband saw your son head-butt the police officer. Both of you separately need to think carefully through your recollections of the sequence of events. From the comments in your post no.5 it appears that the police might have over-reacted using the pepper spray in your lounge. Did they assume that in moving towards you, he was about to do you some harm? When was the head-butting supposed to have taken place? Even if it did (& it's by no means clear that there was a head-butt at all), was it an accidental thing, that happened because of his unsteadiness, fear, flopping about, the police grabbing him? If no bruise or mark of any sort, then if it happened, it must have been fairly mild/ineffectual. That's not the same as a definite, determined effort to head-butt whilst in control of one's faculties. Did the police officer seek medical assistance? Don't accept the "technical difficulties with the body cam". If the police can't produce the evidence, then you must insist that it is argued against by the solicitor very strongly. - it is a record that potentially could stay with your son for a very long time, and have consequences on his life, even after it is "spent". Guess I'm saying don't let yourselves be railroaded, just because you 'know' your son was drunk, and you're feeling a bit guilty on his behalf - there might have been more than the alcohol going on at the time - every aspect needs to be taken into account. Plus it was a Saturday night, and the police may have arrived at your house already fed up with yet another Saturday-night drunk (sorry).

    Apols if this sounds unsympathetic to police, but reading what happened (and recognising that we have only one person's perception) there does appear to have been a lack of knowledge, understanding, or whatever on this occasion. We don't know whether they did, in fact, give glucose / insulin as needed - did they call medical help for him when at the station, or simply a quick exam and then leave him all night to sleep it off, assuming it was just the alcohol. You'll need to see evidence of all actions, and challenge anything that doesn't sound/read right. Not saying police should be perfect - but they should know enough to know when they don't know enough, and should know where to go for guidance - Saturday night notwithstanding. Providing all's hunky-dory with the police, then your son will have to live with the consequences. Glad to see that he's feeling the contrition now - let's hope it continues at least till the New Year's passed. :)
     
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    #27 Salvia, Nov 4, 2017 at 5:45 PM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
  8. BleuEyes45

    BleuEyes45 Type 1 · Newbie

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    I hate to sound harsh or cold but you and your son need a wake up call and some education time. Your son is one step from Cardiac problems with the high cholesterol and his lifestyle. No Diabetic should have a “Chocolate Habit” of ANY kind first and foremost.

    I spent years counseling young Type 1 Diabetic’s ages 13 to 21 about the trials, pitfalls and dangers of being a Diabetic in denial and in the wrong path with their health. I myself have been TD1 since I was 8 years old and just had my 37th year Diabetic Anniversary.

    Your son’s drinking and his Diabetes definitely played the lead roles in his actions the night he was arrested. Drinking and Diabetes just don’t mix when done frivolously and without thought and planning.

    When I was younger I would set parameters for drinking. This always began with a two drink maximum and blood sugar testing before, during, and after each drink regardless of where I was or what was going on.

    Your son needs to get over it! Get over his denial, get over his resentment, get over his childish behavior. The fact is he’s a Diabetic and the only thing that is going to change that is death and unless he WANTS to die he needs to get real about his healthcare and well being plain and simple.

    You as his mother and the one who should love him the most needs to toughen up and stand firm on his compliance with the RIGHT life as a Diabetic.
     
  9. SimonCrox

    SimonCrox · Well-Known Member

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    They should have somehow got a glucose level from a fingerprick because the risk of harm to the diabetic person from a hypo is likely and dangerous, hghly important, and clinically indicated. To get an armful of blood from the person for an alcohol level is not going to be helpful clinically at that time, and would require patient consent, else it is assault!
    Best wishes
     
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    #29 SimonCrox, Nov 5, 2017 at 11:20 AM
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2017
  10. mahola

    mahola Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    No chocolate, at all?! Are you sure??

    I am most definitely glad you aren't mine or my daughter's counsellor! "Needs to get over it" Wonderful skills right there.
     
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  11. claire1991

    claire1991 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My thoughts exactly.
    A very rude/harsh comment!!!
    I’m not sure that anyone who’s been told to “get over it” actually has, in any situation
     
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  12. mossy71

    mossy71 Type 1 · Member

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    Update- my son made an appointment with his gp and she think this is a result of a hyper not hypo looking at his history , also he phoned police station to see if his bloods were checked on arrival to custody but they were not taken till 8am the following morning even tho I asked the officers to check them when they got his to station as he could require insulin and supplied them with his insulin
     
  13. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi mossy, I really, really wouldn't get the GPs opinion. With all due respect, they have very little experience of Type 1 (and as many of us here have mentioned, the behaviour exhibited is very, very unusual in a hyperglycaemic situation - added to that, if no insulin was administered in the police station, and he woke up at 15, then it's also incredibly unlikely that he was hyperglycaemic before entering the building, which is why you need to know what happened there). You should speak to his consultant to get an expert opinion.
     
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  14. slaxx

    slaxx Type 1 · Active Member

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    What has been his highest BG result so far? And are his results either erratic (high low) or hyper most of the time?
    I have to agree with possibility of hyper. Personal experience is when I get to the 250s, im already very very irritable/get angry easily to the point that i would challenge people to a fight. When i get to the 300s my mind starts to feel a bit hazy, and my eyes feel like drooping, and even though im still very irritable i can't find the strength/can't be bothered to argue, and everything feels heavy/sluggish.
    The chocolate issue im not sure of though... unless hes very very addicted to it? (How addicted to chocolate can you be? Drug/nicotine level?) If anything he could also just be feeling overwhelmed by all the adjustments? It's just one of the possibilities though, i don't know how possible it is with his/your current lifestyles. Hope you're both feeling and doing better now.
     
  15. slaxx

    slaxx Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hey there.
    I have to agree about the chocolates, and you have good points, BUT...
    You're doing the tough love approach, eh?
    Maybe you'd like to pick your listener first before you do so.
    Ive also been T1 since 8yrs old. There was a time that i hated being and feeling "abnormal". Esp during the first few years. I used to throw my lunch sandwich away in our school's comfort room just to reach the ideal BG level. My mom found me out. There was also a time that there was a really popular candy brand chewed on by almost 100% of the students. I used to steal that candy just to be able to say that, yeah, i got to eat that. But all this was back during my elementary days, when i was maybe 10-12yrs old.
    Now i saw that OP's son is 21yrs old, and though that might not be a kid's age, the acceptance that you have a lifelong disease is not very different for everyone. Some use their anger as a launchpad to a better lifestyle. Some need more time to accept that what they used to do before, they cannot do anymore. I cannot speak for what OP's son is feeling, but my only point is: they might need education, but they do not need to hear harsh words. Being diagnosed with a life long disease is enough of a burden, you don't have to make them feel worse... don't have to make them feel any more weaker or awful or stupid over a very human blunder.
     
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  16. mossy71

    mossy71 Type 1 · Member

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    Thank you, we are running out of time the hearing is on the 14th if this month the appointment was supposed to be with his diabetic nurse but they rang and said she was off sick so they then squeezed him in to see the gp
     
  17. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You said earlier that he had a solicitor. Has he a meeting with him/her before the hearing? Could you go too so you could put forward some of the things you’ve learned about T1, and to help your son feel supported?
     
  18. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    I would suggest that your son gets urgent advice from diabetic consultant...

    I have had incidents that have needed consultant help and they helped me all the way...

    A GP is only general practitioner and not a specialist.. please state reason to hospital teamand ask for a quick emergency appt...
     
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  19. Julia McCoulough

    Julia McCoulough Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    How much does he drink does he always drink
     
  20. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    The risk of drinking alchohol with taking insulin is that anybody can mistake a hypo for drunkedness and vice versa...

    Even one glass smelt on breath can be enough for police or ambulance people to assume that you are drunk not hypo......they should test bloods immediately, no matter what their opinions are...

    An explanation liking it to not drinking and driving may help son to realise that some people do not drink to go out and enjoy themselves, (or even staying in..)...drinking in excess is really best avoided when a T1, although it seems that alchohol is more prevalent today than when I was a young adult when alchohol was only a babycham at xmas.

    I would really do utmost to find out if blood test was done on arrival at police station...
     
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