1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, Royal Holloway, University of London are conducting a study to understand how people with diabetes create and share knowledge online. Get involved here »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Can we have something good to say about our NHS?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by helensaramay, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,064
    Likes Received:
    767
    Trophy Points:
    153
    The NHS is not perfect. But I don't see this as the fault of the individuals I see on an annual basis who have to deal with reduced budgets, more patients, shorter appointments, longer working hours and the occasional abusive patient. Sure, in an employer the size of the NHS (the third largest employer in the world), there will certainly be some bad eggs. But I don't believe these are in the majority. Call me naive but I think the huge majority of people want to do something positive in the NHS.

    My diabetes nurse has been wonderful. She has been with me all the time I have had diabetes. She understands that I can't sit still, I travel a lot and I am determined not to let diabetes get in my way. The first time I met her she told me diabetes should not stop me doing what I want. Since then, she has helped me ensure this remains the case.

    I am sure there are other positive stories from our NHS out there. I'd love to read them.
     
    • Like Like x 8
    • Winner Winner x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
    #1 helensaramay, Aug 31, 2017 at 6:18 PM
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2017
  2. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

    Messages:
    10,076
    Likes Received:
    13,961
    Trophy Points:
    278
    I've done this before and my blog is full of medical misdiagnosis and doctors, dsn and even an endocrinologist who didn't have the knowledge about metabolic conditions.
    I have always said when posting, if you have not been trained in certain specific conditions. Then your can't really blame them.

    I'm grateful to the NHS for having a specialist endocrinologist who recognised my condition and how to get a successful diagnosis.
    If not I don't believe that if I wasn't diagnosed, I wouldn't be here!

    So regardless of how bad the NHS is in certain things, often derived from political dogma, we need to appreciate the good that they do despite the efforts of the privateers!
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    1,793
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Of course there are success stories. Walk into any A&E any day of the week and you will see one of the best services in the world. The biggest problem that our beloved NHS faces is funding cuts, it is as simple as that. Does that mean the service is perfect? No, because the NHS is populated by ordinary human beings who to a greater or lesser degree range from poor to fair to enlightened. Good and bad just as in any other field.
    Does that mean we should be naiive enough to place one hundred percent trust in any service or professional? No, it does not. We are allowed to criticise as we see fit, knowledge gives us that right.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,905
    Likes Received:
    4,606
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The problem that I see (and quite a few GP's who were at the PHC conference in Manchester said this) is that doctors are treating 21st century problems with 19th century methods. When people have acute problems the NHS is great, heart attacks, infections they can prescribe a pill or do an operation and provide instant help. However it is far less effective to treat 21st century chronic conditions in this way. Patients need to be involved in making themselves better but a lot of HCP's seem unable to cope with this. As with everything else there are some who are great and can do this Dr David Unwin for one but there are quite a few others who can't/won't/don't. Unfortunately the ones I see round here on the south coast don't have this attitude. I have seen my own GP , spoken to another at the surgery by phone and met the diabetes care head in the CCG and all seemed unaware that the advice they gave wasn't helping. I tried to explain what I had done to reduce my HbA1c to "normal" levels but they either weren't interested or kept saying I was "unique". In the end you have to wonder what you have to do to get them to listen! Then when you introduce the statins controversy I tend to get quite annoyed at them..
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 2
    • Hug Hug x 1
  5. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

    Messages:
    23,714
    Likes Received:
    19,870
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Great post @helensaramay :)

    The people who work in the NHS do a fantastic job and I've nothing but praise for them, yes it has its flaws but nothing in life is perfect.

    I've much to be thankful for, not only my treatment for type 1 over the last 35 years but also the care it has provided to my family, from my children being born to the care it provided to my parents in their later years.

    Hope the NHS is around for many generations to come.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 4
  6. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,190
    Likes Received:
    25,497
    Trophy Points:
    278
    I think the NHS is wonderful and we are very, very lucky to have it. We've had threads before comparing the services we receive with those in other countries and according to this, we come out top every time. (The USA comes bottom)

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/jul/14/nhs-holds-on-to-top-spot-in-healthcare-survey

    It is cash strapped, we all know that, but as far as I am concerned the problem lies with management, at all levels. It is top-heavy. Whatever our politics, we can't deny that money is thrown at it year on year. People may (and will) say "ah but not enough is thrown at it". They may be right, but far too much is wasted and this requires better management and better house-keeping. If some Area Health Trusts can do it, why can't others?

    My small town has a brilliant health centre, with a community hospital run by the GPs. We have every possible facility, from X-ray and ultra sound equipment to save us travelling to the nearest main hospital, we have clinics for all the usual common issues like diabetes, asthma, physiotherapy, dentist, ear and eye people, maternity and post natal clinics, a large walk-in pharmacy owned by the partners, a treatment room including minor surgery, a team of District Nurses, a team of Midwives, and many other stuff like that. It wins awards. The Practice Manager is one of the partners along with the GPs. It is very well managed and is therefore successful.

    I have nothing but praise for it and the care it has given me.
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Winner Winner x 2
  7. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,841
    Likes Received:
    7,435
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I've received excellent care from my local hospital for my diabetes. I have a wonderful consultant. She's a genuine person who makes me feel like I own my condition, and really listens to me and my point of view. She's even emailed me out of hours when I had a problem.

    My DSN is fantastic too, and was amazing support through my last pregnancy. I trust her totally.

    I really can't fault the care I've had :) Even the admin staff at my diabetes centre go out of their way to help :)
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,417
    Likes Received:
    1,704
    Trophy Points:
    178
    NHS......... BRILLIANT.
    Biggest problem is the people who abuse it. NHS staff top to bottom and so called patients.
     
    • Agree Agree x 4
    • Like Like x 2
  9. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

    Messages:
    12,514
    Likes Received:
    12,055
    Trophy Points:
    298
    I love the NHS although Ive not had all good experiences.

    I see it that I fight for my health. I dont fight the NHS. We are all living guinea pigs really, we are taking meds that were never available before Bevan and I would have been dead.

    I have had superb equipment, some superb consultants and Professors. I am grateful.

    Even my bad experiences will enhance care for others (hopefully.. so not all bad.

    Lots of positives but I do remain vigilant.

    I always give my surgeons, theatre staff and ward staff lovely fruit baskets with nuts and good nutty bars as thanks. It takes hubby 3 trips to the car to bring them in!!
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  10. dancer

    dancer Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    847
    Likes Received:
    988
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Now, the NHS is ideal for me, but it took over 20 years for them to stop blaming me and actually do something to help my control. I know I am very lucky to have funding for my insulin pump and cgm but it took them a long time to give me the help I needed.

    Unfortunately, my husband has been waiting over a year for treatment for his very painful back. He has been unable to dance or play golf for 2 years, due to back problems. He waited 5 months to be seen at hospital in 2015, then had an operation after another 2 months. He was referred again in July 2016 and had a "virtual appointment" after letters of complaint, over 40 weeks later. He will receive treatment next month. I'm sure you understand why we are not happy.

    Due to osteoporosis, I am supposed to get a bone density scan every 2 years. In 2015, the waiting time was 9 months, this year it is 11 months! Obviously money isn't going where it is required in many parts of the NHS.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Hug Hug x 1
  11. Mbaker

    Mbaker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,499
    Likes Received:
    4,326
    Trophy Points:
    178
    The NHS is a great idea poorly executed in the modern era by our elected politicians. Being married to someone who worked in 2 hospitals I have seen the inside track on exactly what is going on. Both of our big parties have used privatisation, one in my opinion less dangerously (apart from PFI) the other with an ideological agenda of privatisation. Labour used private practices to assist the NHS to drive down over running lists, with the PCT's in control, the selection process certainly in North East Essex was stringent and the outcomes measured (I used to do the Excel audits each month for my wife and helped one of my customers an Osteopath with his); many would not have been aware this protocol was happening, but something needed to be done as waiting lists were getting out of control. My wife went into private practice and was part of a multi-disciplinary team (of circa 16) who assisted Colchester General Hospital, they won an award for the outcomes. The important factor here was that the NHS was in control and just using non threatening providers for overflow purposes - not take over. My criticism of Labour was that they poured in billions but did not close the holes on a leaky bucket and did not listen to IT pro's regarding how to implement the NHS IT system, someone you can probably guess wanted the project completed within a political cycle, when warned it was not possible we know the outcome.

    Then an election occurred the PCT's were disbanded, we the general public paid the redundancies of those in the PCT's who were then duly re-employed by the newly setup CCG's - why didn't they just slim down the PCT's. Then there was a top down re-organisation that no one asked for. The difference with the Tories is that they are happy for larger providers such as Bupa, Virgin Health, Nuffield Health to be in charge, rather than be dictated to by the CCG's, for me this is unacceptable. As you can probably guess these companies have been sub contracting to practices like my wife's and you've guessed again, just like with care homes driven down costs (luckily for my wife her private practice pays the bills). The only thing which would have been worse would have been if TTIP had been allowed, which the current administration were in favour of, the large American health providers would have got their hands on much of our crown jewels.

    I know the above sounds partisan, but it is what I have directly seen and witnessed, and I assume my area is no different to the rest of England and Wales (I believe that devolution means Scotland and Northern Ireland run differently). Nothing wrong with the people in the NHS, you don't choose this work if you don't have a calling - take the NHS out of politics, or at worse make it a cross party concern.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  12. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,348
    Likes Received:
    3,814
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I have not lived in the UK since 1970, but I do remember being in hospital when I was about thirteen years old. I was put in the mens ward as the children's ward was full up.

    The best part of that for me was being taught how to play various card games such as pontoon and poker.

    For this I thank the NHS as this has stood me in good stead all through my life. :D
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Funny Funny x 3
  13. Diabeticliberty

    Diabeticliberty · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    3,370
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Can we have something good to say about our NHS? I can categorically state that it has never in my life ever let me down. I have plenty of good things to say about it. Without it I dare say that I and many of us here as diabetics would not be alive to gripe and complain about it. I was recently in an A+E Department on a Saturday night with a friend who was rushed in with anaphylaxis. Lying in a corridor we were met by a lady in blue scrubs who treated my friend. The place was in absolute chaos as quite frankly they obviously had far too many people to treat with not enough resource and the strain that they were all under was visible and palpable. I asked her why she hadn't considered a change as working under the obvious stress and strain could not be good for her? She responded by telling me that she had been at the same hospital for 35 years and if she left then she would be letting down the people that needed her most. This in essence is the core of the NHS and for the most part the completely selfless and totally dedicated individuals who prop it up. I do not wish to politicise my post but the fact of the matter is that the NHS is still desperately short of resource that only tax money can provide. If it means that I have to pay more tax to fund it I would be happy to do so. The lifesaving and life enhancing service it provides to us all is very much worth every penny they take from me.
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Winner Winner x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. Glenmac

    Glenmac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    1,686
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Our NHS is wonderful,as are the majority of those working in it.My family have much to thank the NHS for.The birth of my son ,when I developed eclampsia and was blue lighted,semi conscious and fitting to hospital.We both survived and had fantastic care in the hospital and from our GP and health visitor for many months afterwards.Fast forward and my daughters melanoma was spotted by her GP,just in time,and treated by the NHS within days.Fast forward again when my youngest son,at age 29,had a stroke.He had wonderful care atTheNational in London.He had to learn to walk and talk again......What a struggle but he did....The staff were incredible,I cannot praise them enough.As a biology graduate,whilst still paralysed he volunteered himself for a research programme,as his mobility progressed,at the Wellcome clinic over the road from The National and the expertise and compassion of the researchers we all marvelled at.........Yes,as a family we have had moments of exasperation with various aspects of the NHS,usually overtired individuals,it's not perfect,but compared to many countries,it's excellent "at point of need" One of the problems is the leap forward in treatment and equipment,all costly,but making better outcomes for cancer patients and heart patients and many more......Like Diabeticliberty,Ifeel that perhaps the only way forward for the NHS is in an extra tax for those who can pay.Many of us,of pensionable age and with the resources,would be happy with this.After all it's because we are here today that we too put pressure on the NHS!!!Some of us also look back to pre NHS times when,in my case my mother had to have a small amount put aside,in case a doctor had to be visited!I still have the letter,written by my paternal grandfather,in London in the middle of the blitz,entreating her not to be too proud to accept the money he'd enclosed to pay for the treatment of my broken arm,ex-rays splinting etc. whilst my father was in Burma.
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Winner Winner x 1
    #14 Glenmac, Sep 1, 2017 at 11:10 AM
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2017
  15. Pinkorchid

    Pinkorchid Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,821
    Likes Received:
    1,496
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I think it is sad when I see people on here putting down their doctors and the NHS in general. I think they do a wonderful job in what these days is quite difficult times with all the cuts etc. I happily have not had any hospital experience so mine is only with my medical practise. The doctors are really good as are the practise nurses and the receptionists are always very helpful and not the dragons that some say they are at their surgery Although we are one village there are two separate parts of it so the practise has a surgery in both so we are lucky that we can always get an appointment at one or the other maybe a couple of weeks sometimes if it is not urgent or we want to see a particular doctor but that is the case I think in most medical practises these days.
     
    • Like Like x 6
  16. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    I'm sure there are. Most Health Care Professionals are exactly that - professionals. But diabetes seems to be an area where the NHS can let us down. You learn very quickly that the diet advice is suspect, even downright dangerous for diabetics. Then the treatment is inadequate, in my opinion. Of attempt is made to help and support diabetics to achieve normal blood glucose levels. Of course, personal responsibility for your own health plays a big part; but, it seems to me, HCPs expect us to get worse, and their inaction guarantees it. Then, there is the political choice not to give the NHS the funding it needs.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Well said.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Completely agree with what you say. Even signed a petition against TTIP. Not sure where we stand with that now, but it would have allowed US companies to sue the UK Government if it did anything to affect their profits - like reinstating proper control over standards, or taking privatised companies back into Public ownership - perhaps to avoid a postcode lottery of care, for example. I believe of of the American tobacco companies used a similar arrangement to blackmail the Australian Government over plain paper packaging. We need to be vigilant that this nonsense doesn't raise its ugly head again in any negotiations for a post Brexit trade deal with the US.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  19. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Dedicated staff, but a resource problem.
     
  20. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,321
    Likes Received:
    812
    Trophy Points:
    173
    I don't think anyone is criticising the HCPs, except for their blinkered approach to diabetic treatment. You identified the real problem yourself.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook