1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Carbs and type 1 diabetes

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by idawikstrom, Nov 10, 2017.

  1. idawikstrom

    idawikstrom Don't have diabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Hi guys,
    My partner has type 1 diabetes since 8 years back, and he know exactly what to eat and not, no doubt. But I'm a nutrition amateur (not for long!) and I have read a lot about carbs aren't that bad as they always seem to be for someone with diabetes. Is it anyone here who eats for example carbs like beans, potatoes, legumes etc without any problems? Those types of carbohydrates contain big amounts of fiber and protein and doesn't contain any saturated fats, sugar etc. Thank you!
     
  2. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,043
    Likes Received:
    752
    Trophy Points:
    153
    In a simplistic way, insulin works by converting glucose in our blood to energy.
    If we have no insulin, or not enough, our blood glucose levels (BG) will raise which is very dangerous.

    When we have type 1 diabetes, we produce no insulin so need to inject it to manage the carbs which have been converted into BG. We have to count the amount of carbs we eat and calculate our insulin doses to match this.
    There are some difficulties with this such as correctly calculating the insulin dose and timing it to match the point when that glucose reaches our blood.
    To help overcome this, some people with type 1 diabetes reduce their carb intake.
    If your partner is comfortable with his carb counting and insulin timing, this is not necessary and he can eat carbs in the same way as someone without diabetes.

    This is the approach I take and have maintained good control over the last 15 years.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,256
    Likes Received:
    3,521
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi @idawikstrom It depends on what insulin he takes, so for instance if he's taking novorapid and carb counting then as @helensaramay has said he can eat what carbs he likes as long as he injects the correct amount of insulin to cover the carbs. If he's on mixed insulin then he would need to eat a set amount of carbs at each mealtime.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. kaylz91

    kaylz91 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    280
    Likes Received:
    429
    Trophy Points:
    103
    As others have said there's nothing he should strictly avoid as a Type 1 if he carb counts and adjusts to suit, unless he knows a certain food doesn't work well for him, I eat potatoes almost every night and I don't have a problem with them, I also eat chocolate, bread the things some people say to avoid x
     
    • Like Like x 4
  5. Circuspony

    Circuspony Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    41
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I can carb count and get the right insulin dose for rice and potatoes, but give me a bowl of pasta and no matter how accurate I am with the carb counting my BG rises and rises and I start to feel ill. So I rarely eat pasta these days and if I do I have to inject about 30 mins beforehand.

    You might find that your partner has worked out what carbs he struggles with and that's why he's avoiding them.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Fairygodmother

    Fairygodmother Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    138
    Trophy Points:
    103
    I find that low GI fibre rich carbs work best for me as the glucose content's released more slowly, but as the others say it depends on the type of insulin people use and what works for them. It may also have something to do with each individual's gut biome but I'm not an expert so I can only speculate. It's really nice that you want to know more about what's best for your partner.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Daibell

    Daibell Type 1.5 · Expert

    Messages:
    9,326
    Likes Received:
    6,030
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I hate to disagree, but any carbs will increase blood sugar unless more insulin is taken and if the carbs are too high weight gain may result. Yes, fibre is always good. Saturated fats are not the problem the media talks about and the research data is very questionable. All carbs turn to glucose in the stomach and not just sugar. As diabetics we are by definition glucose intolerant so need to keep the carbs under control, have good fibre-rich ones as you suggest when we do have them and balance with enough protein and fat.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. idawikstrom

    idawikstrom Don't have diabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    _____________________

    He's taking novorapid and another which is taken every night before bedtime (24h), sorry for not remembering the names. I'm new to this but reading a lot as I want/need to get more knowledge. He doesn't count his carbs that much, but avoids white bread, pasta, potatoes, legumes, beans because they're high in carbs. That's where I'm confused, and ofc I would never force him to eat something he wouldn't. But as I was saying before that beans for example are low in GI, it's a high-quality carbohydrate, contains protein and also soluble fibre which can help to manage the blood glucose levels, and also essential for a healthy gut flora (win-win situation I believe!)
     
  9. idawikstrom

    idawikstrom Don't have diabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    __________

    Thank you. That's exaclty what I'm trying to say to him but he is quite certain about what he should eat and not. I've read that low GI foods are good for diabetics. Just like you mentioned that foods that are low in GI tend to break down slowly and therefor less likely to cause a rapid increase in blood sugar levels. I just want him to have a bit of variation when it comes to food and of course learn more about it.
     
  10. idawikstrom

    idawikstrom Don't have diabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    _________________
    Yes, no doubt about that and I respect that completely. It's just an understanding point of view from my side, and if I can help I will get knowledge and do my best. We're all different in the end so we need to do what works best for ourselves.
     
  11. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,256
    Likes Received:
    3,521
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Hi there @idawikstrom the real proof that what he's doing is working is if his blood glucose levels are in target before each meal time and his HbA1c is within his target range. I tend to take my quick acting 20 minutes before eating to avoid spikes and I also tend to avoid pasta, bread, sugar, rice to avoid the unpredictability of the rise and timescale of this, so eat a vegetable/protein rich diet. Ultimately we all have a unique physiology so what works for me may not be right for another type 1. If he's happy to work with you on different foods types and reporting back on his results then this could be a positive step forward for you both and to bring you closer in working in a common goal.
     
  12. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    713
    Likes Received:
    246
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I think the OP is correct in considering the GI (glycemic index) of carbs. I don't see that referred to here all that much. But I find it useful. Glucose is the common molecule for energy, be it from carbs or protein. And insulin allows the glucose molecule to enter cells where it can be used for energy. Once in the cells it's no longer in the bloodstream/serum in high concentrations. IMO where the low carb craze came from was Type 2's. They have lots of (ineffective) insulin, and high carbs increases insulin secretion, increases hunger, and with it caloric intake and weight. We don't really have that problem. If we greatly reduce our insulin intake we'll lose weight in a real big hurry. And not in a good way either.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook