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Curious about hyps

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Soapybubs87, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just wondering last year i experienced a few hypos where i felt like i was having a stroke my nan rang an ambulance on one occassion when i stayed at hers..im curious if anyone else has had similar the time the paramedics were call my blood sugar was only 2.8 where as ive been walking around with sugars of 1.8 before and it affected me but not like that....it was so scary whats the worst you have had?
     
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  2. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Some people find they cannot move when very low. Luckily I've not had one that severe.
     
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  3. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hey @Soapybubs87 that sounds pretty scary, it was wise to call the paramedics to be on the safe side. We have had a member report recently that she get's leg shakes for a few days after her hypo, there are many side effects to having hypos, my only thought is that the brain is being starved of glucose and so from that point of view the effects can be similar to that of having a stroke. The worst symptoms I get are when I sweat and shake profusely and I seem to lose quite alot of mental capacity to do anything so have to lie down for about 30 minutes, sometimes I have even fallen asleep from the drain of it, however that's been rare, I am on a pump now so hypos are far less severe and less frequent too. Perhaps this could be a discussion for you to have with your nurse and see if a pump would be a good option for you ?
     
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  4. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hoya i spoke to my consultant in july and they have referred me for the daphny course still waiting to hear as i was thinking about the pump it is a hard thing to try and get on as i was told i have to do a 5 week course (1 day a week) then they will review 6 months after the course and then a further 6 months after that then if no improvement is made then you can be considered for a pump
     
  5. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Soapybubs87 Yes getting onto DAFNE is really important in the process of getting access to a pump, they really want to see you demonstrate good control, and DAFNE is recognised for empowering you to be an expert in managing your type 1. My best advice is to push your team on getting onto this as soon as you can, there are many reasons why someone can be considered for a pump, have a read of the NICE guidelines here: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta151/resources/insulin-pump-therapy-for-diabetes-pdf-374892589 don't be put off in any way, it's easy to get discouraged but keep on at your DSN to get their support for this.
     
  6. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks yeah im hoping that with being young and having eye damage eill go in my favour as well as the shift work i will give the DSN a ring
     
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  7. porl69

    porl69 Type 1 · Member

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    Hi Soapybubs, I have had a few really scary hypos. Last year while camping with a very understanding other half. She had to call an ambulance at 3 in the morning, apparently I was fitting and in a pool of sweat....the only explanation I can give on that one is that I believe I had inject my bolus instead of basal at 10pm (16 units). I had one while living alone in my house where I actually thought I was dead! can remember waking up to go to the toilet and seeing myself white in the mirror and thinking how the hell am I going to tell everyone that I am dead!!!! After a fair few finger pricks and cant remembering what i needed to do to sort it I eventually came around to assess the damage I had done to my house....IE blood testing stuff thrown around the living room, the kitchen destroyed and sugar all over the place. Both very frightening.
    As a lot have said get on the DAFNE course....really push your diabetic team hard for this. And good luck
     
  8. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Soapybubs87.

    I used to have regular hypo's when I would not be able to move one half of my body, be hyperventilating and having to try to get to where I had some sugar / lucozade on my back using one leg to move myself along the ground.

    It would take me about an hour just to realise I was having a hypo and then another half hour to just get off the bed! The confusion was terrifying.

    I used to drink and for any new Type 1 diabetics who may be alcoholic (seriously) there is an incredibly high chance you will experience these type of hypo's. Don't laugh but one of my consultants told me there is actually a name for these alcoholic hypo's. Wait for it......... Mega Hypo!... I don't believe him as I've never come across any other alky diabetics that have told me that is what they are called!

    These would always be in the early hours of the morning for me. 2,3,4am after a heavy session of booze and spirits. I would wake and just lay there not being able to move one side of my body and have little coordination of the other side. I would not be able to talk either, just moan / scream. Buckets of sweat. Really frightening to know your dying.

    Thankfully haven't had one of those for well over 13 and a half years now and have 36 years of being a little overly sweet :cat: (cat lover)

    Anyway I didn't mean to scare anyone just stating what it was like for me a few hours after a session after waking up from being passed out.
     
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  9. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Aww yay for the cat loving (i habe 2 6month olds who are onsessed with the xmas tress atm) one was after drinking but the other few had no alcohol at all but did occur early hours, i thought i was being attacked by a demon at first as it was like bekng locked in my own body i couldnt even move my head up off the pillow and felt like i was being pinned down i woke up after finally coming around to bruises scratched carpet burns my lamo smashed vedsode table turnes over, sugar all over the kitchen floor milk coke all over the sode and floor items of clothing wet and coved i coke...(i still made it to work for 9am) ive not had one like that since well over a year thank god!
     
  10. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ha sounds exactly like the ones I experienced. The mess all over the place. Trying to get the top of a bottle of milk! Managing to get myself up somehow and then falling forward / behind and smashing myself to pieces on furniture.

    I also would get to work but with a headache that lasted all day and the shakes from the hypo but the drinking also..

    Ahhhhhh the good old days (joke)

    Always if your having a few drinks (i don't mean like me) have a packet of nuts or half a sandwich whilst doing so (or something similar). Alcohol is full of calories and sugars go high very quickly but they also drop alarmingly a few hours later if you have drank too much.

    Great analogy "being locked in my own body" That was exactly what it was like.

    Ha thanks for the memories :banghead: Thats me smashing into a wall!
     
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  11. kevinfitzgerald

    kevinfitzgerald Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    And another member for the cat lovers!..
     
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  12. Soapybubs87

    Soapybubs87 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh god! Ive injected my nova rapid rather than my levemir once i was half asleep and picked the wrong pen up amd injected 28 units!! I think i tested my BG about 30 times that day
     
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  13. EllieM

    EllieM Type 1 · Active Member

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    I've done this twice (injected humalog instead of lantus at night). The first time I realised immediately and started to load up on carbs. The problem was that I was on a road trip with my husband and daughter (getting her lots of kms so that she could take her driving test) and we were staying in a camp ground with not very much food. (We had some glucose but enough for normal hypos not for insulin overdose hypos). So I busily tested my blood sugar every ten minutes while my family searched the car for any odd supplies of glucose. (It was 11pm at night so no chance to buy more food). My blood sugar went down into the 2s before it eventually started to go up and I swore I'd never make that mistake again. Unfortunately I did the same thing a few months ago and didn't realise that I'd done it - my husband had to deal with my major hypo in the middle of the night and I felt awful for the next 24 hours....
     
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