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Drops for retinal photography

Discussion in 'Diabetes Complications' started by jane1950, Sep 18, 2017.

  1. jane1950

    jane1950 · Member

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    I am considering opting out of retinal photography, as the past 3 have had without the use of drops, but have a new provider for this this year, and they are refusing to do it without or at least try to do it without.

    They always get a brilliant photo without the drops, so why should I be bullied into having the drops.
    I have an optician in the town I live, who says I can ask the doctor to refer me to them for the photographs
     
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  2. Mr_Pot

    Mr_Pot Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    How do you know they always get a brilliant photo?
     
  3. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Opting out seems drastic, to me. What is your reason for refusing the drops, if you don't mind me asking?
     
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

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    I wouldn't be opting out personally. I would be too afraid of future problems. Better to put up with eye drops than end up with eye problems at too late a stage. I have been told that without eye drops the pictures are not as detailed.
     
  5. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    How do you know the photos are brilliant? The screens used to view the photos 'on location' to check the positioning etc. are often vastly inferior to the screens used to examine the image later. The photographer often thinks the photo is fine even if it later turns out to be borderline unassessable when examined in detail. Obviously, the poorer the image, the less likely it is that any sight-threatening retinopathy will be detected.

    The screening service should not bully you into having drops. They should explain to you why the drops are used and that, in line with national guidelines, they won't take photos without them.You can then decide not to have eye screening - it's your choice.

    Some opticians will take photos but if they are not part of the national diabetic eye screening service:-
    • the software they use is usually less advanced and they may take only 1 photo instead of 2
    • they may not have the specialist qualification for detecting diabetic retinopathy
    • they may not have a great deal of experience of detecting diabetic retinopathy
    • they won't have the quality assurance checks in place that the eye screening does
    Having retinal photos taken at the optician is better than having no screening.
     
  6. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I was told a year or two back that now they are asked to always use dilation drops - previously they didn't always use them on me if it was a dark and dingy day and my pupils were wide enough anyway. I think the guidelines have changed, as I have been told that now they have to use drops every time.

    It's a faff, admittedly, what with not being able to get home under my own steam. I was able to sort a lift to and from the clinic this last time, but I was in charge of taking the minutes at a committee meeting that evening, and looking at a backlit screen all evening while trying to make sense of the overbright blur was a bit of a challenge. I didn't mind though, as if I have a problem with my eyes I would much prefer it to be picked up than risk it being overlooked. Worth the faff, in my opinion.

    :)
     
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  7. Grumpy ole thing

    Grumpy ole thing Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Several things about this for me, firstly opticians can do this without the drops so I assume it's cost saving as the photographers are poorly paid, and the graders are not opticians. Secondly there is no choice, which instantly grates against my views on personal choice, thirdly, I am not convinced there won't be some negative effects from the drops in the future. This may be of interest www.raspberrypi.org/blog/#an-affordable-ocular-fundus-camera
     
  8. serenity648

    serenity648 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I asked about the drops at my last check, last month, because they make my eyes sting badly. Its quicker and therefore cheaper to use the drops. A good, clear photo is guaranteed, causing fewer recalls for a second photo session.

    as regards my choice being taken away - well, so many, many medical procedures have to be done a certain way, that I dont consider the choice issue at all. If its a choice between a guaranteed, free photo session, or the service being withdrawn as too costly, and a greater risk of needing to be recalled, I go with compliance.

    (I know, there are too many commas in that, but I cant figure out the correct punctuation - sorry)
     
  9. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My optometrist and ophthalmologist will not do retinal photography without putting drops in.

    So it stings a bit. but it is not a life shattering experience.
     
  10. Red shaw

    Red shaw · Member

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    I request not to have the drops as they are too strong for me. My eyes stay dilated for 48 hours and I have had migraines from them. The photographer lets me sit in the dark and my pupils grow as big as they would with the drops. Apparently it's something to do with having blue eyes. My optician said there are weaker drops available, but the photographer doesn't have them.
     
  11. lovinglife

    lovinglife Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My son had to have these drops in every 3 months from he was 3 months old until he was 15 (complex eye issues) he took it all in his stride which amazes me as he also has autism- so although I absolutely b****y hate them and secretly sulk when I have to have them I feel I have no reason to whinge out loud (though I do so profusely in my head lolololol)
     
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  12. librarising

    librarising LADA · Well-Known Member

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    Just so us 'blue eyes' aren't misrepresented, I'm a 'poor' dilater and require the stronger drops. Afterwards I feel no need to wear dark glasses.
    Geoff
     
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  13. Red shaw

    Red shaw · Member

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    Must just be me then.
     
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