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Fed up :(

Discussion in 'Other Health Conditions and Diabetes' started by SPAM29, Jul 9, 2017.

  1. SPAM29

    SPAM29 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hi, can anyone relate to my problems? I've been a Type 2 Diabetic for 14 years from the age of 28, with the associated problems of high BP and cholesterol. For the past few years I have had a few tummy troubles, but it has been really bad for over a week now. I saw the GP who thinks it could be diverticulitis, especially as my father has it. Everything I eat makes it worse, I'm popping pills like no tomorrow.

    I'm on an intense course of study with exams coming up and placement, like I was just before I was diagnosed with diabetes, I tend to not show signs of mental stress, instead my body seems to get physically stressed. I technically work 2 jobs but I feel like I'm falling apart and can't bear the thought of going into work and putting on a happy face :grumpy: After my course my life will still be stressful because of my job. Apart from that I have three children to manage.

    I seem to be stuck on a hamster wheel and now when I go to the pharmacy I bring back a big carrier bag of meds, not a little paper one, and I'm only 42! Sorry if I sound whinny, I just feel so crap at the moment :depressed:
     
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  2. SockFiddler

    SockFiddler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @SPAM29 and welcome to the forum. And, please, accept some e-love and hugs <3

    Stress is just the worst, and we parents tend to internalise - normalise - carry on, which ultimately does us no good at all. We reach a point where no amount of meditation and calm, deep breaths will make an ounce of difference.

    I don't know anything about diverticulitis (except it's unpleasant and painful), but I'm wondering what you're eating?

    Personally speaking, I've been in catastrophe mode for the last 14 or more months and truly felt like I was being torn apart. I was diagnosed with T2D on 19th June and initially felt as it that was the final straw. However, less than 3 weeks on a low-carb diet, with the support of the lovely folks here, and I genuinely feel I've turned a corner - physically, mentally, emotionally.

    You're not whiny. You need to put it all somewhere. I'm just wondering whether the "everything I eat makes it worse" is a low-carb approach or not (my 25-year-old Reflux problem has been almost completely resolved).

    Don't be disheartened and don't give up. You're in a good place to start taking control and feeling better. I'll tag in @daisy1 who has some really useful information to start you off.

    Hang in there, kiddo, you're far from alone.

    Sock x
     
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  3. SPAM29

    SPAM29 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks Sock Fiddler. I've been 'trying' to do low carb and a bit of intermittant fasting for a few months now, constantly trying to shift the weight to improve my Diabetes, as some carbs really send my blood sugars up. Some of the foods that are advised for Diverticulitis still upset me. I found the link on here for the Specific Carbohydrate Diet after I'd eaten sweetcorn, the list of forbidden foods is depressing! I'm off to Kensington Olympia tomorrow (actually today) to the Vegan and Allergy show, I'm hoping to get some ideas .

    It's that this couldn't of come at a worst time. I'm at a really busy point in my course and I feel so rubbish, the pain and discomfort is making it difficult to revise and I've been swinging between constipation and diarrhroea, not fun especially with a long train commute and working in the community!
     
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    #3 SPAM29, Jul 9, 2017 at 1:38 AM
    Last edited: Jul 9, 2017
  4. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @SPAM29. 12 years of this and I know the frustration so well. But you can't give up. People are relying on you, do worry because you have a dedicated team behind you.
     
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  5. SPAM29

    SPAM29 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thanks Leslie :)
     
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  6. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    @SPAM29 .I'm your tablet rattling friend. My chemist delivery man has now changed him name to chinese delivery. My bag is huge too.
    I've split my repeat prescription this month as my neighbours are big curtain twitchers.
    I'm praying I get off some or most of my meds after bariatric surgery either late this year or early next year.
    Its getting ridiculous ordering so much. I just cannot keep up. Poor chemist neither.

    I just want metformin in my life.... no other meds. Especially blood pressure ones....I want them gone. Dizziness and lethargic side affects especially.
    I want to feel like me again!

    Tramadol maybe the biggest hanger-on. :(

    Goodnight from me as I'm ready to relax and sleep at last. Keep posting.
    You're definitely not alone! :)
     
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  7. cott97

    cott97 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are definitely not alone, my chemist gives free carrier bags and they keep me in bin liners! I swallow over 20 individual tablets a day plus 2 inhalers and my insulin. I also use a CPAP machine, a mobility scooter, a walking stick and I am currently having physio and acupuncture. I am 49 and it all started just after I turned 40. You have to keep going and look on the bright side. I have a wonderful family, a job I mostly enjoy and a dog who can only have short walks so suits me perfectly!
     
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  8. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Retired Moderator

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    @SPAM29

    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope it will be useful to you. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 245,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  9. Avocado Sevenfold

    Avocado Sevenfold Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @SPAM29 I am tagging @Winnie53 as she has experience of the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. Enjoy the event today :cat:
     
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  10. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am just learning about this condition. It affects one of two adults age 60 and older. I really need to find the time to research it. I personally had a couple of episodes of this a few months ago. I think what brought it on was eating four cups of salad greens and raw vegetables for lunch repeatedly. I think the "bulk" was too much. My plan is to resume eating this way, but in smaller amounts. I think I just over did it. Live and learn.

    This is a serious condition that can lead to complications requiring hospitalization.

    If you can maintain a food diary and symptoms, that will help you identify which foods are making the problem worse. I wish I could be of more help. Nuts and seeds by the way are no longer considered a problem, so I'm still eating raw nuts.

    I read your posts earlier. I wish I could be of help. I just haven't studied this condition yet.
     
  11. Mep

    Mep Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Spam and welcome :)

    I understand your frustrations... at least know you're not alone. You're similar in age to me and sounds like some similar problems too in that I was diagnosed in my 20's with diabetes and in my 40's now with a lot more medical problems added to it. I also have hypertension and on statins for cholesterol. As you say, it is like a hamster wheel isn't it... you just have to keep going though. I know what you mean about shopping bags from the pharmacy too... feels ridiculous leaving there with a big bag... but such is life of the chronically ill I suppose. I feel like I help keep them in business. lol. You have our support here. I wish you the best. :)
     
  12. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I know it so well, the frequent bouts of illness, weakness, lack of stamina and frequent irritable periods. The meds, the blood tests and God knows what else! Yet we live and we conquer. What else can we do?
     
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