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Feeling annoyed!

Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by Greg1957, Nov 26, 2017.

  1. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So, I took all of my tablets as prescribed, cut out all sugar, ate fresh vegetables and my meat mainly consisted of chicken minus skin, or fish. But my diabetes has only got worse, then I found out about insulin resistance, like many I went head first into researching this phenomenon only to find that the most probable cause of my continued demise was the bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, turnip, etc I did not know how damaging carbo's could be. My bloods ranged from 11-15 my highest was 26 after a Chinese takeaway, meanwhile, I visited my diabetic nurse, who told me that my heart is the same as someone who has already had a heart attack, that I could die at any time, this came 4 years after my younger brother died in the chair, the diabetes had hardened his heart muscles.

    Her prescription was to raise my medication still further. But being armed with the no carb info that I had found online, I stopped nearly all carbo's including root veg and my favourite mushy peas, I have a little porridge (heard it would cut my cholesterol) with fresh blueberries or raspberries for breakfast, lunch is generally avocado and kippers, and my evening meal is lean chicken or fish with piles of leafy veg, sprouts, courgettes broccoli asparagus etc. I started this on the 25th October,

    In one month I have lost ten pounds, my glucose levels have steadily declined ( but the morning reading is often higher than my night time reading) my bloods are now between 6.4 and 8.4 and still dropping. I have been diabetic for 14 years, and I had to find the solution by hearing about insulin resistance and hitting the internet. This is not good, is it to late to improve my chances re this
    Timebomb of having a fatal heart attack at any time, can I do anything to make the heart muscle a bit more flexible? I am annoyed that even today the powers that be do not highlight insulin resistance how it can lead to diabetes, and how to tackle what is a nationwide if not a worldwide problem. Why are companies allowed to sell foods that can lead us to an early death. Does profit come before people?

    For me they can stick the bread from heaven, along with pies pasties rice pasta root veg and processed food where their mother never kissed them. (Being Cornish, surviving without pasties is hard)

    Today I have to resist the urge to go up to someone with a shopping trolley full of carbo's and processed foods, and tell them to do some research before they put that stuff in their mouths or the mouths of their children, I don't ........fearing a punch on the nose, but someone needs to before it's to late for them.

    Yep, annoyed, frustrated, perhaps a little angry

    End of rant, thanks for reading, so about this heart of mine, anyone got any idea's?
     
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    #1 Greg1957, Nov 26, 2017 at 12:55 AM
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2017
  2. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Cardiologist if you have not seen one. Get the work done as you appear to have a good handle on it thus far
     
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  3. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Asked my doctor for this end of October, awaiting the letter. Thanks.
     
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  4. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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  5. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Well done on finding your own answers, there's still lots to learn even for those old hands amongst us. Keep reading and learning, knowledge is power.
     
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  6. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you very much, I have watched the video and it reinforces what I have learnt. I believe that we all have the freedom to choose a poor diet, but there should be a hard hitting public information campaign to inform people of insulin resistance and diabetes, it's causes and solutions. It has been done with cigarettes so why can't it be done for this life changing condition.
     
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    #6 Greg1957, Nov 26, 2017 at 1:58 AM
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2017
  7. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you, I agree, hindsight is king lol
     
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  8. No2D

    No2D Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The most effective way to reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease (heart attack and stroke) by a significant percentage is to bring your blood sugar down to a non-diabetic level and keep it there. No compromise.

    Significant percentage is 2 - 3 times
    Most effective means more effective than most medication, stents, bypass, or the low fat thalidomide mentality gobbled up by the masses.

    All the problems caused by diabetes / metabolic syndrome/ visceral fat / damaged adipose cells / inflammation are dealt with by bringing blood sugar down to non-diabetic levels. All of those things damage your heart and blood vessels. Additionally get plenty of rest, light exercise (walking) daily, HIIT and some strength training. Let your outrage drive the changes you make.
     
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  9. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Master

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  10. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On it! Levels have fallen dramatically over one month, With my doctors advice, I hope to be off gliclizide by Christmas, my anger is that my own ignorance and a lack of information got me to this stage. I am delighted to have joined this forum, it is a great resource and appears to be full of wonderful people. Thank you.
     
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  11. lindijanice

    lindijanice Type 2 · Active Member

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    Welcome @Greg1957! First of all, I am sorry for the loss of your brother and trust that you are making the right changes in your lifestyle to avoid that fate and perhaps in some way pay homage to him by becoming healthy and wise about all things pertaining to diabetes..... You are headed in the right direction, that is for sure! Congrats on that! As someone earlier said, I think, funnel that energy you are feeling into making yourself the best you can be and you will be an example to others....Go for it:) Will enjoy following your progress! Blessings/L
     
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  12. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Greg1957 and welcome to the forum. The answer is yes, unfortunately.
    While big food manufacturers make huge profit from loading processed foods with sugars, and pushing sugary drinks, and high carb foods they will continue to do so. And they have the financial clout to influence politicians.

    You have done well to find out for yourself the effects of starchy carbohydrates, and it sounds like you are doing well.
    I don't know anything about heart problems, but a lot of the Type 2s on here do find that the low carb approach to eating does improve their health generally.
     
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  13. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm one of the exceptions...but good for you for tackling it head on and best of luck.
     
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  14. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    turnip is a near innocent 5g/100 so dont worry if you have some. however swede is 9 so maybe give that amiss. carrot boiled is 8/100 so 100 grammes of 50/50 carrots and turnips would be 6.5 not too bad.
     
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  15. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @Greg1957

    Hello Greg and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 276,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  16. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you,
     
  17. Greg1957

    Greg1957 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thank you daisy,
     
  18. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome Greg! I think it’s simply criminal that the NHS don’t advocate low carb eating and self monitoring. I luckily stumbled on this forum the night I was diagnosed, in a shell shocked state. I’m so glad I did, as in the six months since diagnosis I’ve lost over 4 stone in weight and got my HbA1c down from 70 to 36. God knows where I’d be if I hadn’t found all these lovely people and their advice, eating the Eatwell Plate and increasing my drug intake and HbA1c results no doubt. I turned my negative emotions of diagnosis into a determination to improve my future. I try to educate people, not in a pushy way but if the subject comes up I tell them my low carb tale. I hope you can make similar achievements and reduce your future health risks too.
    PS I hate mushy peas! :hungover:;)
     
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  19. Granny_grump_

    Granny_grump_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree with what you say,I've been type2 for 17 years no help or wrong help until I found this site. Good luck with your heart problems hope you can get the help you need with your questions!K
     
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  20. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello greg, and welcome to the forum.

    I am so sorry to hear about your brother. It mist have been a big loss and also very frightening.

    I agree with just about everything you have said. I was given the eatwell guide and told that t2d is progressive. Didnt much fancy going blind or losing my feet so didnt follow any of the advice. Thank goodness for this forum. It has changed my life.

    I dont have heart problems( that I know about), so have no advice for you about that. But would like to recommend jason fung on youtube. His lectures are inspiring. Also have a look at his dietdoctor wbsite, but only sign up for the pay part if you think its useful.

    As to.the eatwell guide____ well, tescos helped to.design it. Nuff said.

    And well done on your achievements so far. It is never too late.
     
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