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Feeling super down after getting diagnosed! :(

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by HilmarHalfdansson, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. HilmarHalfdansson

    HilmarHalfdansson Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hey everyone, My name is Hilmar I am Icelandic 33yo and I was diagnosed a month ago with D2.
    I am just so sad that this is where I am at and I know I am lucky in many ways. I know a lot of people have it way worse but I feel like I have nowhere to share this.

    I inject myself with Insulin now both Insulatard 1x and Novorapid 4 x a day if need be. And it always seems to be necessary. I feel constant guilt and shame about anything I consume. I feel better in some ways now after I got the Insulin but also I feel very strange and my mood is so unstable. I normally never lose control of my emotions or get angry but I feel like I am constantly having to put out fires that I caused with both friends/family and or just strangers that I am rude to because everything seems so hard now. I have no patience and I am very quick to feel like it's me against the world.

    I do blame myself a lot because I should have been taking much better care of myself for many years and I have become overweight now. It's a strange thing as I felt I was doing "right" after quitting drinking alcohol over 5 years ago. But I quickly just replaced wine with sugar drinks in the evenings.

    Evenings and nights are hell for me and I just can't stop thinking about food or sugar. I feel like I should be stronger and thank God for having a beautiful life. But I also feel like I can't do anything that makes me feel good or happy. The more I read the more depressed I get and I am just really struggling with this. Also, I feel like my BS is all over the place and I feel scared all the time if I am doing something wrong. I find it so hard to get motivated to exercise and just want to sleep or be in bed all day. I have cut out all sugar and I count my carbs. It's just a very sad life. Has anyone been here? Any pointers?
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome to the forum. First things first, please do not blame yourself. No one chooses to become Diabetic, it happens and no one is exactly sure as to the full range of causes. At diagnosis we go through the gamut of emotions, this is normal and is a process that may take some time before we can get to the stage when we accept that life has to be lived a little differently than before but we can overcome the difficulties that we are faced with and return to a semblance of normality.
    It takes time to get used to medication of any kind, this coupled with the bombshell of diagnosis means that blood glucose and mood will be affected so some people can become depressed and even try to blot out their condition preferring to ignore it. Support is needed and should be taken whether that is from freinds and family (or indeed, an online support group) or from your health care team. Insulin or the lack of it can directly affect mood so it is no wonder that you are feeling low but this will pass.
    I will page @daisy1 who will post the welcome pack offered to newcomers, there are links within this that will start you on your learning and with the help of others who use insulin you will be able to get a better handle on the condition. You have taken the first step, well done.
     
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  3. HilmarHalfdansson

    HilmarHalfdansson Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you so much for this comment and I feel a bit better now. I think just by getting my overwhelming emotions into words, putting it out there plus your very kind response helped. I guess I will feel better eventually and this to shall pass ( the sadness and effects of a new drug ). Good to feel welcomed here and I am very thankful for this forum existing. Thank you again!
     
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  4. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Well-Known Member

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    @Guzzler siad it perfect. It’s never good but it could be worse. This forum is great for support and advice. Stay tuned....
     
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  5. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You really expect sympathy when you beat England at football??? :)

    Seriously...... first know that you are not alone. It may feel like you are, but there are others who feel just the way you do.
    This forum is many things to many people.
    There are those here who have the knowledge and willingness to help.
    Others will listen and encourage.
    Keep talking, you'll find a way.
    Good luck
     
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  6. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @HilmarHalfdansson Hi. I would say it can get better, folks round here are very supportive. There are always down times but the thing is to find something that works for you and stick to it. Easier to write than do.... and it's good talk.
    Wish you well.
     
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  7. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @HilmarHalfdansson

    Hello Hilmar and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 259,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. Most of these are free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  8. Salvia

    Salvia Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hello Hilmar, glad to have you join the forum. Now that you've got over the first hurdle, hopefully things can only get better. Have a browse around, read through the info that daisy1 has given, and check out the various sub-forums. There are plenty of people around who will be happy to share their experiences or help with any questions that you may have.
     
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  9. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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  10. srobertson06

    srobertson06 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I just wanted to say you are not alone in your feelings, you will come to terms I am sure with the way life has now changed for you.
    People here are a great support with a vast amount of knowledge.
    I believe we all feel down about our individual situation from time to time - at least I know I do.
    I can say for myself it was a huge learning curve which too me a long time to get through.
    To simply say all you need to do is cut down on carbs is a very easy statement but for me at least so very hard to do and I still struggle but I still hope that it will become easier as time goes on.
    Take the support from here and know you are not alone and that other's feel exactly the same as you and have come through it.
    I hope you feel better about your situation soon and that as you gain more knowledge that you feel more in control.
     
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  11. first14808

    first14808 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Heya, fellow newly diagnosed here! Look on the bright side, hákarl is low carb, just watch the potatoes.. and please stay downwind..

    Some of what you're feeling, I've been going through. Some of what you're feeling may just be down to changing your diet, especially if it was a sudden carb reduction. Some of it may just be down to time of year, especially if you're in Iceland.. But it will get better!

    But do you have a glucose meter? If so, get testing. It might show your BS really is all over the place, and that's pretty normal. Aim is to get the average down to safe/normal levels. I'm using mine to see how my body reacts to different meals, and yes, carb counting sucks. But once I've been doing this a while, then I shouldn't need to and can just make food because you'll know what to avoid. So having eaten it, I know to avoid hákarl..

    For me, knowing I'll have to avoid things I usually enjoyed eating sucks, but it's for my own good. And if I do it, I'll feel better and be healthier. Plus it's an opportunity to vary my diet and try new things!
     
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  12. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum Hilmar. As someone who was also diagnosed with T2D this year I have some idea what you are going through. These feelings are normal, but of course they do not feel "normal" at the time. This is a great place for help and support, both emotional and practical. Take care.
     
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  13. HilmarHalfdansson

    HilmarHalfdansson Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you so much for this! I am so grateful for all the help and support :)
     
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  14. HilmarHalfdansson

    HilmarHalfdansson Type 2 · Newbie

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    Thank you everyone for the comments and I feel better just knowing that I am not so alone in this. Everything is still "hard" and I want to "give up" many times a day. What I mean by giving up is wanting to live in denial. I know that's insane and not an option.

    But I am getting better and there is maybe something to what first14808 said about the effects of my reduced carb intake on my mood. And this time of year is normally dark, cold and hard here in Stockholm ( I moved here from Iceland 2 years ago ) And as I did in Iceland to cheer up I would turn to food for comfort. Now that is not an option. I know this is healthier and better for me of course in the long run. It still is challenging and exhausting in some ways.

    I feel very glad that I randomly found this site and found all of you guys. Thanks for beings so welcoming, informative, supportive and nice.
     
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  15. Glenmac

    Glenmac Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @HilmarHalfdansson Welcome to the forum Hilmar.This is a great forum and there are many people here with knowledge and practical advice,plus they experience living with diabetes every day like you.Most of us felt overwhelmed at the beginning,but it does get easier.You sound to have made a good start.These long,dark days and nights can make it seem more difficult,and a need to cheer ourselves with food!!There are ideas in the food section which you may find helpful,with ideas for food,snacks or treats that are appropriate for you.
     
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  16. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome here Hilmar this forum is a great place to be in for knowledge and debate
     
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  17. Sean01

    Sean01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @HilmarHalfdansson
    I saw your post on facebook - the impact of diagnosis hits you hard and you are still young - I was diagnosed in my early 50's and it still hit me like a truck - even though I could see it coming (mood swings, highs, lows, diet out of control etc, BUT - you are Icelandic - you come from from a land of super strong super determined legends. Find your inner viking. Do not feel guilt and do not feel shame - these will only add to the problem. Draw a line in the snow - and cut out the carbs - pasta, rice, bread, chocolate, cakes - banish it and rebuild using the right food. We watch documentaries in the UK on the Icelandic diet - I'm coming to retire in your country - I love the cold and the diet will keep me healthy for longer.

    You will have to learn to eat - I found one trick in the evenings is to eat a meal with chop stix - it takes a lot longer and that's a good thing. It's boredome in your mind that turns you to food that is all - occupy your hands and get down the gym.

    You want pointers - please get down the gym - not some namby pamby fitness gym - you need a challenge and Iceland will deliver - you have some of the world's bets strongmen in your country - so you must have some of the best strongman gyms in the world - find one, sign up and go for it. I did -and I haven't looked back. I'm in my 50's and my first competition is next summer - of course I'm not going to win, but I am beating my diabetes daily and please believe me - you can rise above this.

    You are now one of us - this page is full of some of the bravest and most determined people I have ever met - meet them, talk to them, learn from them and take their encouragement. Your diabetes will not define you - it will make you a better, more courageous and more determined than you could ever imagine.

    Sean
    T2, October 15, metformin, diet and a shed load of exercise. (Strongman and half marathons) Winning
     
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  18. Farrowlily

    Farrowlily Type 2 · Member

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    My daughter was diagnosed couldn't get her levels down on 500g metformin so went on a low carb prof and lost four stone and looks and feels great she took control which is important
     
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  19. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    Warm welcome @HilmarHalfdansson .... @Sean01 said it very well. You've landed here and yes, it does get better. Diabetes is not the framework of your life. You frame it
     
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  20. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @HilmarHalfdansson and welcome to the forum. It is a shock when one gets that diagnosis, but this condition can be controlled.
    You should also talk to your doctor about how you are feeling, it could be that you are also clinically depressed, and treatment can help with that.
     
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