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First visit with doctor

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by cherrydarling_, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I couldn't take them - made me run to the loo unfortunately and made me feel vaguely nauseous from the word go. They are unfortunately known for their ability to upset the tummy!
     
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  2. cherrydarling_

    cherrydarling_ Type 2 · Active Member

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    Yeah that' what I was like yesterday, even worse when I was trying to settle the littlun to sleep. It' quite tricky trying to get somewhere fast, whilst trying to be super quiet :nailbiting: not too bad today though, just making some really strange noises (think stranger things series 2 :joyful:)
     
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  3. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I remember the pharmacist saying that you had to start on a very low dose and to gradually get used to them. Yuk - they wouldn't have done me much good anyway since I get spikes due to the steroids I take. Good luck for you.
     
  4. cherrydarling_

    cherrydarling_ Type 2 · Active Member

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    Did you get prescribed anything else?
     
  5. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

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    There is a slow release version of Metformin that is supposed to be kinder on the tummy. However, in most people (not all) the tummy issues go away after a week or two.
     
  6. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's the age old "if we change the delivery method we can renew the patent on our profitable drug that went generic and stick it to the patients some more." Or make a combination of 2 generics and call it something new and charge up the a#* for it.
     
  7. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had already been prescribed Gliclizade as well which I tolerated without a problem. I seem to be getting now to the point where I don't need it (after over 4 stone weight loss). I have been having a few hypos lately and have begun to drop one of the Gliclizade now (I was only on 40mg twice daily)
     
  8. EliseC65_

    EliseC65_ Type 2 · Member

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    I joined the club, just over a week ago and my stomach hasn’t stopped yet. Seeing gp on Tuesday so I can have sr instead. I had to leave a class for 15 minutes yesterday as I was in severe danger of an accident! Daren’t go up a dose yet until I’ve got this sorted.
    Is this how metformin works? Food doesn’t stay in your system long enough to be digested. Well, mine isn’t (gross). Weights dropping off though :/
     
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  9. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Not sure that's quite right. You make it sound as though GPs are not as qualified as a hospital specialist and that is far from the truth. My grand daughter has nearly completed 5 years as a med student and is about to start on 2 years Foundation at which point she becomes a junior doctor. Only after that she will she train as either a GP or as a specialist hospital consultant - several more years on top of the 7 she will have done already.
     
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  10. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    During the about 5 weeks I took Metformin I think I managed to take two on two days, the rest it was just one a day.
    I had so many side effects - but not one was noted on my record.
    I have not seen my own doctor since being told of the diagnosis, so than goodness I have sorted out myself during the year since then.
     
  11. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    im odd ive gone the opposite way 2x500
     
  12. les1480

    les1480 Type 2 · Member

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  13. les1480

    les1480 Type 2 · Member

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    Really you've answered your own question as you said your granddaughter is trying to be a doctor and then at some have to specialise iver as a GP or as a specialist in one field
     
  14. gardengnome42

    gardengnome42 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Not at all, it would be a very narrow field if everyone was a 'specialist ' in everything. My grand daughter, like all the other medical students had to go through a huge selection process to get into med school in the first place, so they are already top of the tree before they start. [And she's not trying to be a doctor, she is one, or will be in February!]
    You make it sound as if a GP is an easier option and second rate to being a specialist whereas all students have to go through the same process for 7 years, then they can decide to be a GP or a specialist and it is more years again before they get there.
     
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  15. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Here it's similar: 4 years college, bachelor's degree. 4 yrs med school, medical doctorate degree. 3-5 years "residency" in your specialty (3 yrs internal medicine was what I did, at a different university from the medical school). Then you would be a specialist in internal medicine, emergency medicine, pediatrics, Ob/Gyn, ENT, radiology, whatever. Then we can subspecialize and do a "fellowship" (mine was cardiology, 3 more years). Others include endocrinology, rheumatology, pulmonary, GI, oncology. You pay to go to college and med school. A "cheap" state university college of medicine costs $30,000/ year, private schools twice as much (no scholarships). But you earn a living wage as a resident and fellow. Then a lot more after that.
     
    #35 TheBigNewt, Dec 11, 2017 at 8:23 PM
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2017 at 8:50 PM
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