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Getting back on board

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by XarinaAkhtar, Aug 13, 2017.

  1. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Hi

    Newbie here going by the name of Xarina. I was diagnosed as pre diabetic in 2010 becoming diabetic in 2012. I did really well in 2013 losing three stone and bringing by hb1ac to around 39. Unfortunately in 2015 I suffered two knee injuries while at the gym (I have arthritis too) and have piled the weight back on, which doesn't help the knees. Using a PT to get back to exercising which is going ok but my blood glucose levels are still iffy along with developing a distructive trait regarding my eating. Can anyone give me some advice to motivate me? My hb1ac is at 61 at present. Doc wants it around 53.
     
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  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome

    What way of eating are you currently following and are you taking any medication?
     
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  3. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Hi

    I'm on metformin, gliglazide and sitagliptin.
    As I said my eating habits have become destructive. Biscuits, chocolates, home made cakes. I eat clean during the day yet ruin it all in the evening. I get in from work if I have a meal ready then good, if not then it's been a take out
     
  4. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    So you are having pretty high carb meals which won't be helping your blood sugar levels.
    you may want to have a read of the success stories thread to see how a lot of people control their bloods through diet alone. It is possible to get off medication if that is a motivator for you. It certainly was for me but I had a very bad reaction to metformin.
     
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  5. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Planning your meals is one way to get into the way of eating. Perhaps a slow cooked would help, if you put it on in the morning so that your meat was waiting for you when you got in - and having a hearty meal, so that you aren't tempted to eat anything later.
    Just do not have biscuits or cake in the house, if you have chocolate make sure it is high cocoa low sugar.
    You will need to be careful if you eat low carb as the medication you are on could push your blood glucose low as it is so effective.
     
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  6. Lily76

    Lily76 Type 2 · Active Member

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    Hi Xarina

    I'm no expert (diagnosed Aug 2015, initial success then head in the sand, now making some progress) but I experienced some of what you are talking about: crazy eating, out of control.

    My Hbac1 was not quite as high but I felt really bad about the lack of "willpower" and "control" and it was making me miserable as well as fat and ill.

    What helped me was 2 x metformin a day and, more importantly a Low Carb High Fat diet. I am losing weight and not craving like crazy.

    You say you are "eating clean" during the day but what does that mean? May be you are not eating enough, hence the evening binges (I can relate!) or maybe you are still eating too many carbs albeit healthy ones. We all tolerate food differently.

    If you haven't already, I would suggest getting a blood glucose meter and testing yourself 2 hours after eating to see what effect certain foods have on your levels.

    Good Luck and don't get too frustrated about it all as that leads to more bad feeling and therefore bingeing.

    You'll get there again.

    Edit: What Resurgam said about the low carb is probably right with your medication.
     
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  7. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Thank you. I'll give your idea a go. I had problems with medication too but the sitagliptin helped. I just want to be well ...
     
  8. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Love your hb1ac readings. Really encouraging. I will bake cakes at home, adjusted to a low sugar recipe. My doctor did say that I could eat chapatis but with all the low carb directive confuses me.
     
  9. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Thank you so much and Hi. The lack of control and willpower along with crazy eating relates. I know that I have done this before and most likely can do again but the switch in my brain refuses to co operate. I work in a school, so during lunch I always go for a protein item with salad or vegetables and sometimes half a jacket potato or a serving spoon of rice or pasta, but mostly the former. I must admit though that recently I am left unsatisfied with what I have eaten and will have a banana at 3pm then continue on until I get home at 6pm before I eat again. A blood glucose monitor is a good idea. It did help me with my recent results but when is the best time to test?
    Talking with you guys is great. Your advice is invaluable and maybe I need to rethink my nutrition according to me.
     
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  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Master

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    Hi,

    It can be confusing, but becomes less so when you learn that all carbs, no matter what the source, convert to glucose once inside the system. Sugar is just one carb, so avoiding that is good, but you also have to restrict all the other high carb foods. The worst culprits are bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, breakfast cereals and flour based foods. We also need to be careful with fruit.

    Do you have your own blood glucose meter? If not, I strongly recommend you buy one (your doctor has probably told you there is no need to self test, but you do if you want to control this.) Meters can tell us at a glance what our food choices have done to us. We can test before we eat to get a baseline, then again 2 hours after first bite. If the rise from before to after is more than 2mmol/l there were too many carbs on the plate. Ideally it is best to keep any rise under 1.5mmol/l. Keeping a food diary including every ingredient in that meal and portion sizes, and recording your levels alongside is a good way to learn. After a period, patterns will emerge, giving you the opportunity to reduce the carbs in that meal or eliminate some altogether.

    Seeing just what your choices have done to you could be an excellent motivator.
     
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  11. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Chapatis are about 15gm of carb each, and you don't eat them alone, so that could result in a really high carb meal - but potato rice and pasta are all high carb - you might find that even a small serving pushes your blood glucose quite high.
     
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  12. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Carbohydrates in the form of sugar (sweeteners, fruit) and starches (below ground root vegetables, beans, legumes, grains) are highly addictive. When we remove all non-vegetable carbohydrates from our diet at once, it takes a couple of weeks before the withdrawal symptoms stop.

    It takes a high level of resolve to get through it. You'll receive support here if you ask for it during that period.

    It greatly helps to first remove these foods from our home, also to replace them with tasty fats, proteins, and above ground vegetables, mushrooms, onions, garlic, herbs, and spices. To this day, if I'm battling a craving, I'll eat pickles, green olives, half an avocado, nuts, cheese, or pats of butter.

    I did it in February 2015 within 3 days of learning about the low carbohydrate diet, commonly referred to as LCHF. Breakfast was eggs and vegetables, lunch was a soup or salad, often with nuts and more vegetables, dinner was meat, poultry, fish, or seafood with vegetables. (If you're vegetarian, there's a forum here for vegans/vegetarians who eat a low carbohydrate diet that includes limited amounts of beans, legumes, and whole grains.)

    As suggested here by others, a good place to start is to begin testing with a glucose meter so you can see how the foods you're currently eating affect you. Test before each meal and snack, then again 2 hours afterward. Also to begin learning about which foods are okay on the low carbohydrate diet.

    Having significantly reduced my carbohydrate intake two times, once in 2011 when I stopped eating gluten containing grains, then again in 2015 when I learned my diabetes was out of control, I think in retrospect I wish I first had done more research on what foods I could eat and how to make them more interesting and satisfying. That said, the one thing I quickly learned was that nothing reduces cravings better than healthy fats.

    Reducing highly refined sugars, starches, and highly refined seed oils while increasing whole foods is a good place to start, that along with testing before and after meals and snacks. To find the cheapest test strips and the meter that uses them, state which country you live in and forum members here will tell you which one is the cheapest.

    I'm preparing to start the elimination diet to determine which foods I need to remove from my diet because I have multiple autoimmune conditions, and I'm developing new ones. I've been putting off doing this for more than 2 years. This morning I woke up and realized I just have to do it, and the first step is to learn what I can eat during the food elimination process, and to plan meals around those foods before I begin the diet. Only then will it feel doable for me. It helps that I've successfully changed my diet before, so I know its challenging but doable with adequate preparation.

    Best of luck to you. Some of the greatest gifts in life are good health and good friends. You'll find both here. For more information on the low carbohydrate lifestyle a good website is http://www.dietdoctor.com . :)
     
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    #12 Winnie53, Aug 13, 2017 at 7:59 PM
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  13. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Hi and thank you. The blood testing advise is and will be helpful.
     
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  14. frankbegbie

    frankbegbie · Active Member

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    As if having Diabetes isn't enough.

    And I thought I had problems.

    Best of luck with it.
     
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  15. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @frankbegbie I think diabetes is enough of a challenge. :)

    Autoimmune conditions don't require much more effort to manage. You just have to figure out which foods your immune system is reacting to, then eliminate them. After a period of time, the foods your immune system were reacting to can be reintroduced. Sometimes you can resume eating the food, sometimes you have to delay longer and try reintroducing them one at a time later. Gluten, possibly the casein (which is a protein) in dairy from cows, are the exception though - (because those who react to gluten sometimes react to casein too). The good news is that having autoimmune conditions forces you to eat a much cleaner diet, similar to what people ate a 100 years ago, so overall you become healthier. :)

    I want to add additional detail to how I eat to manage my diabetes.

    I love the high carbohydrate foods: sugar, fruit, root vegetables, grains, beans and legumes.

    I have almost completely eliminated sugar and other sweeteners from my diet - (I use the natural sweetener stevia instead, mostly for beverages made with fresh lemons and/or lime and to sweeten whipped heavy cream for a treat).

    I still enjoy higher carbohydrate foods but in very limited amounts:

    Sugar - mostly when away from home in the form of a small, non-grain, cookie or muffin, typically made with shredded coconut or almond flour for example. I try to not bring foods that contain sugar into my home.

    Fruit - berries, lemons, limes, and grapefruit are all low carb and can be eaten with meals in small amounts. I eat a few berries with most meals. During the warmer summer months, I make lemonade or a lemon/lime beverage with fresh mint leaves, sparkling water, and stevia. For all other fruits, I have an ounce (28 grams) of fruit, which means having only a small section of fruits like apples, bananas, or oranges. That small amount immediately following a meal actually satisfies me because I'm eating it for it's sweetness and unique flavor, not to satisfy my hunger.

    Root vegetables - when I first started the low carbohydrate diet, I'd eat no more than a quarter of a carrot on top of my salad. Today, now that I tolerate carbs better, I often have a whole raw carrot with my lunch. Other favorite root vegetables like potatoes and yams are only eaten with meals, and are limited to an ounce (28 grams). Last night I sauted a mix of vegetables in butter - (onion, mushrooms, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, broccoli, red and green pepper, carrot zucchini (corgette), and half a small red potato sliced) - for my husband and I to accompany our ribeye steak. As with fruit, a small amount of a root vegetable is satisfying with an otherwise low carbohydrate meal.

    Grains - I can't eat wheat, rye, or barley due to my gluten sensitivity, but can still eat rice, oatmeal, and some other grains. But they all spike my glucose levels, so I rarely eat them. If I do, I only eat them in a very small amount, typically when I'm eating away from home. Low carb coconut and nuts are a better choice for me.

    Beans and legumes - Rich in fiber, for recipes that include them, I eat them on occassion, just in lessor amounts.

    Reducing carbohydrate intake can be done all at once or slowly over a period of weeks or months.

    Carbohydrate tolerance varies greatly among those who have diabetes. I probably eat 40 to 60 grams of carbs a day, some eat less, other eat as much as 75 or 130 grams of carbs a day. Everyone has a different "tipping point" - (the amount of daily carbohydrate intake that is tolerable as evidenced by their glucose meter).

    We eat protein to repair and rebuild our body, and we eat healthy fats to replace the calories lost when we greatly reduce our carbohydrate intake. In general, ketogenic diets, which are useful if weight loss is desired, are 50 grams of carbohydrates a day or less, and low carbohydrate diets are 50 to 130 grams of carbohydrates a day.

    Examples of unhealthy seed oils, due in part to their high omega-6 content are soybean, corn, safflower, canola, sunflower, cottonseed, peanut. Learn more here... http://www.healthline.com/nutrition/are-vegetable-and-seed-oils-bad#section8

    Healthy oils and fats are butter or ghee from grass fed cows, olive oil, coconut oil, avocado oil, and fat from animals, poultry, fish and seafood that are eating their traditional diet.

    Each oil and fat have their own "smoke point" that damage them. When cooking with oil or fat, I use butter or I cook at low temperatures. I no longer eat deep fried foods. If on a rare occassion I want to eat some root vegetables that are slightly crisp, I'll thinly slice them and pan fry them with butter.

    In addition, I eat a higher carb meal on occasion, particular when with family to celebrate a birthday, Valentine's Day, Fourth of July, Thanksgiving, Christmas, or New Years. One higher carb meal isn't harmful, particularly if followed by a brisk walk.

    We each need to find our own path to managing our diabetes. It takes time, and we each need to find our own pace. Some do it all at once, others do it over a period of weeks or months. Monitoring glucose levels after each meal or snack provides us the guidance needed. :)
     
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  16. frankbegbie

    frankbegbie · Active Member

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    A few good tips amongst all that.

    I'm on a steep learning curve.

    I'm trying to look at it in a positive way instead of negative with not being able to eat bread and potatoes.

    Its just different and it's what I need.
     
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  17. XarinaAkhtar

    XarinaAkhtar · Member

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    Definitely a lot of good information in your post also. Thank you. Today was day one with a few changes and blood glucose testing. I went out and bought a monitor . My readings were 10.8 in the morning and went down to 6.1 two hours after lunch. Will see what my reading will be before bed.

    The welcome and advice has been so good here. I feel better already.
     
  18. Winnie53

    Winnie53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's excellent @XarinaAkhtar! Here's a link to two graphics that will help you understand where you are now, and where you want to go with your glucose levels over the next weeks and months... http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/thr...-to-the-50-shades-of-diabetes-graphic.121077/ It took me four weeks to get my glucose levels down. Then over the year that followed, my glucose levels continued to improve, though not as dramatically. You're off to a great beginning. Informed is empowered. :)

    @frankbegbie I like your attitude! For us, this is more than a dietary change, it's a lifestyle change. :)
     
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