1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Have you been told not to test your blood sugars?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by desidiabulum, Oct 30, 2014.

  1. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,318
    Likes Received:
    811
    Trophy Points:
    173
    Not necessarily. I just watched Bernstein's video on the ADA reporting on the ACCORD study
    They could be honest about it I suppose.
     
  2. andyfh

    andyfh Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    60
    Likes Received:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    58
    From the other side of the fence;

    "So it's not never to test; it's just that there are very specific circumstances where we know testing can be of value,".
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/type2-diabetes-blood-sugar-overtesting-1.4157581

    For the record, I am pro self testing', but I am also pro debate and strongly believe that both sides of any argument should be made available for all to consider.

    I very much look forward to seeing how the views of those in my link are challenged by you guys.

    Regards
     
  3. serenity648

    serenity648 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,105
    Likes Received:
    1,067
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I agree with the article that self testing without the knowledge of what to do about test results, is not going to help. It is just a series of number, and of no use to anyone.

    So the issue is not whether to test or not. The issue is in giving or witholding from people to knowledge of what to do about their results.

    From your linked article is appears that people were not being given constructive information of what to do to reduce their testing number, rending the testing info useless and possibly harmful to those who got stressed by rising numbers with no means of control.
     
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  4. AlexMagd

    AlexMagd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    135
    Likes Received:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    63
    I was told not to get a meter and not to test, but quite gently - and more from the 'your diabetes is not so bad right now and I don't want you to obsess about testing' perspective rather than 'it's never helpful'.

    That being said without testing I would not have been able to identify some particular foods that spike my blood sugar and would likely have continued eating them until my next HbA1C.

    We'll see what my GP says when I go back with (hopefully) a much lower score in a few months.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  5. Granny_grump_

    Granny_grump_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,394
    Likes Received:
    3,887
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Good on you, makes you wish you where there to hear there comments!
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. leslie10152

    leslie10152 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,140
    Likes Received:
    1,485
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I've never been told not to test bgl's. My GP's first question when I see her is 'have you tested lately'.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  7. negara123

    negara123 Don't have diabetes · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    What are the symptoms of diabetes? What are the ways to prevent it? Is all diabetes inherited?
    And whether diabetes is treatable?
     
  8. Labito_

    Labito_ Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    Yes, I was told by a doctor at my GP practice it was not necessary when I wanted to show her the results. She refused to see the test results
     
  9. Bob-111

    Bob-111 Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    6
    Trophy Points:
    23
    Yes, I was told the same thing. No need to test.

    Bob.
     
  10. Anthony1738

    Anthony1738 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    164
    Trophy Points:
    53
    A fascinating subject, and its quite obvious that the non prescribing of testing equipment to T2s is purely down to cost. It is very important for T2s to monitor BG levels in my humble opinion in order to make dietry decisions in a structured manner. I live in Thailand where there is no welfare, no free healthcare, and an insurance provider will not touch you with a barge pole if you have type 2. So its no great surprise when my doctor told me of the importance to test my BG levels in a structured manner and supported me 100% throughout the process! Would it be the same outcome if the Government of the Kingdom of Thailand had to foot the bill?
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. stevekelly

    stevekelly Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    1
    A couple of years ago when I tried to re-order testing strips etc I was told I no longer need to test my blood. I could do so if I wanted to but I would have to pay for the strips and lancets.

    As a result of diabetes it looks as if I now have colon cancer. I'm going for a scan on Wednesday and the letter has told me to test my blood. Not sure how - I don't have a meter.
     
  12. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    6,216
    Likes Received:
    10,805
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Just read around on the web. All the answers are there. Why are you asking? The answers are way too complicated
     
    #832 Mike D, Sep 24, 2017 at 11:55 AM
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2017
  13. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,994
    Likes Received:
    5,298
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Dear Negara,

    this thread is about whether or not frequent blood sugar testing with a meter, test strips, and lancets that you prick yourself with is something useful to do frequently.

    Post a new thread about your general questions. But generally, if you go to the Wikipedia or almost any medical website, you will see some general things about diabetes symptoms for the various kinds of diabetes, sometimes you can prevent it with diet, sometimes you are born with it, it is not always inherited as some forms are nurture and some forms are nature, it is treatable but not curable, and not all types of diabetes get the same treatments, have the same co-morbidities (other diseases that can also be present), or have the same chance of remission.

    Why have you joined the forum if you are not diabetic and why are you writing in this particular thread?
     
  14. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,994
    Likes Received:
    5,298
    Trophy Points:
    198
    you seem like a winner so I sure want to know what your doc told you to do, what you are doing and how you achieved such spectacular success
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Anthony1738

    Anthony1738 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    164
    Trophy Points:
    53
    Hi @Contralto
    To keep this answer on thread, yes I was told to test and how to test and when to test and to keep records and report back with my records on each visit, and boy I am I happy that I was given this information!

    When I was first diagnosed some 4 months ago my doctor went to great lengths to explain to me how diabetes works and the reason why I developed it. Theres a result sheet attached which he used to explain to me in no uncertain terms that my beer consumption caused my triglyceride levels to rise to such a level that my pancreas was carrying too much fat to work effectively, he then referred me to a diabetic specialist, a lady doctor who sent me for further tests, which confirmed me as a type 2, and also confirmed that I was carrying too much fat on my liver and pancreas although my bmi was normal. She prescribed me a bagfull of drugs, 5 pills per day, 3 for diabetes, 1 statin and 1 blood pressure which was too high also. She exlained about the possibility of getting Hypoglycemia and its effects, and told me to stop the medication and come back to see her. I started getting Hypos about three weeks in to taking the medication on a daily basis in the evening just before I ate dinner, so I did as she said and stopped the medication and went back to the hospital.

    I saw a different doctor, (fortunately for me) who sent me for further tests, the tests came back within the hour and was amazed to see that my BG level had dropped to 130 from 269 so the new doc took me off all meds apart from 500 mg Metformin per day. And told me that the reason for the big drop was my new diet (Low Carb) and the reduction of beer consumption and increase in excersise had caused the removal of the fat on my essential internal organs and my insulin production was almost normal but still a slight resistance was noticeable. I was advised to keep records of what I ate and he resulting BG readings. He went on to encourage me to continue with my diet and excersise regime, I also introduced Intermittant Fasting for 18 hours Monday and Thursday, and still do.

    My third visit to hospital and retesting in September revealed all my levels were normal and he took me off all meds, to date I am still recording normal levels, both FSB and post prandial, I have started experimenting eating different foods and adding carbs to my diet, such as potatoes, white Rice and Bread in small quantities at first and I have yet to see a BG spike higher than recommended levels published on this website, of before meal 126 and 2 hours after 140. My doctor also told me that he wasnt interested in my FSB but more interested in my readings after eating and what I ate.

    I dont consider myself a winner, but I do believe that I am lucky to have the right doctor, had I remained with the first lady doctor I am sure my outcome would have been very different.
    View attachment 24034
    img001.jpg img002.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
    #835 Anthony1738, Oct 2, 2017 at 2:26 AM
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  16. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,994
    Likes Received:
    5,298
    Trophy Points:
    198
    thanks for the detail. I think it might help a lot of people.

    You are a winner. You found things that worked, quit the beer, had a dramatic change in especially your triglycerides, somehow found out about intermittent fasting and got yourself to normal.

    Iffin I were U, howsomever, I would add more interesting carbs, like native potatoes in blue, purple, red (there is this kind of tiny ones red inside in a starburst) and green, a few kinds of native corns from Peru, some awesome grains breads like spelt, and soe rices that taste pretty good on their own like Burnese reddish brown rice, black Vietnamese rice, American pecan rice, a couple types of buckwheat (all the amino acids, not a grain) and wild rice which is alsonot a grain

    Cause all those taste better than what you mentioned. After all your good behavior, I think you need some treats
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. cocobee.2017

    cocobee.2017 · Active Member

    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Yes I have been told by a so called hcp that I should not test. I am prediabetic with a strong family history of T2. She said it was obsessive, unnecessary & inaccurate compared to the three monthly hba1c. They must all be instructed to say the same thing. And why I ask? It's all about the money I'm sure.
     
  18. Kingmob

    Kingmob Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    13
    Asked about testing shortly after diagnosis, was told not to and for T2 that only necessary if taking medication that requires it. No further explanation.

    Attended desmond course, group was asked if anyone tested, myself and one other attendee say yes. Was asked where I got meter, said I purchased myself, was grilled about who trained me to use it and the next 10 minutes spent explaining to other attendees that testing wasn't necessary and causes anxiety.

    Was totally surprised when shortly afterwords everyone given blood results from time of diagnosis (most people at least 2 months), some showing high hba1c (>100) and a scale with 80 showing as deep red at the end of the scale. No mention of how current value may be lower due to medication/diet or advice on retesting.
     
  19. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,119
    Likes Received:
    685
    Trophy Points:
    133
    "Have you been told not to test your blood sugars?" Well, in my case, it never occurred to me, was not even mentioned by my doctor, and even after being a member of this forum for a few weeks now and finding out a lot about self-testing, it seems to make little sense in my case.

    The overwhelming evidence since my diagnosis is that my T2 has been fully controlled solely with diet and exercise. The only testing has been in-clinic HbA1c every two to four months, and that will probably be stretched to six months eventually.

    I do understand that by frequent self-testing I could figure out which foods (or activities) spike my glucose levels. But (in my particular case) I fail to see the benefit, as long as the overall/average result over a period of several months shows that the T2 is fully controlled.

    Having said that, we are all different and I completely understand (1) that for many people, frequent self-testing is a medical necessity and (2) that, also, some people just want more information so that they can be assured that they are doing the right thing, on a daily or even hourly basis. I'm also grateful for all the advice here since, if things worsen, self-testing could be in my future in any case.

    Edited to add: I have not read all 42 pages of this thread, but it does sound like some doctors are inappropriately trying to discourage self-testing even when it seems medically essential!
     
  20. Roywfield1

    Roywfield1 Type 2 · Newbie

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    I was also told not to test by my nurse
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook