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I like being a 'Junkie'

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by Chowie, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Active Member

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    I have been chased out of a shopping centre (mall) by a women (I assume) screaming at me all the way out of the centre, I assume they were upset with me very discreetly bolusing for my meal I was about to eat, I couldn't explain to them, because I don't think they could speak English, but they weren't interested in listening.
    On another occasion one of their'friends' had security throw me out for the same offence. I don't know how they could even see, the only thing that was viewable was the blue pen cap.

    The local council (in Victoria they service a number of suburbs and all they do is Garbage collection, run swimming pools and a few health centres run by nurses and social workers) where I have to hand in my full sharps containers and get empty ones, they are really kind, nice and empathetic, until they find out you are diabetic and not an illicit drug user and then the abuse starts and I mean abuse. They also then put on gloves to hand over the new empty sharp container, up to that point they would give you as many as you want, but diabetics only get one and very reluctantly at that.

    Fast forward to yesterday:-
    I travel for work. I return home every 2nd weekend, so I travel with supplies for 3 weeks. Work decided that I won't return home for 5 weeks. I found the closest bulk billing surgery (that means they only charge the government rebate).
    I told the Dr I needed a prescription. That started a tirade, it's illegal in this state and especially in the CBD of Brisbane to prescribe Oxycontin... After 5 mins I interjected as he was onto the health lecture and I explained that all I wanted was insulin. Then it started again "Insulin is a very dangerous drug and can easily kill. I eventually convinced him that I was Diabetic and as soon as I had managed that he was great, he told me to pull my chair around so I could make certain he was prescribing the correct 'container', I use prefilled pens. $83 later, the most expensive GP visit I have ever had I have my prescription in hand, so much for bulk billing.

    To make things more difficult my temporary office has just been renovated and we moved in yesterday. The toilets are really well lit everywhere, but are almost dark in the cubicles with a blue tinged light (male toilets).

    I have now wised up, I'm a junkie when at the council and behave like a junkie when not at home. I have plenty of distilled water and alcohol wipes as the council give them to me as I'm now a well behaved 'junkie'.
     
  2. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Wow, how different from my diabetic experiences. Firstly I've never had anyone comment or even cast an aside glance if I happen to bolus in a restaurant. Ever. Secondly I've never used a sharps container. We have them at work in the hospital of course, but at home? I used to use a syringe for my Lantus vial injections. A box of 100 would last me about 4-5 years, I kept the syringes in a little case of 6 and would discrard them every couple months. Just toss 'em in the trash can. Same with pen needles. I keep them on the pen until the pen runs out, unscrew it, toss it, screw on a new one. Why make it complicated? Why involve other idiots? Needles are cheap, no need to get them paid for using insurance.
     
  3. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My GP charges around that amount ($85.00) for a consultation of between ten and twenty minutes.

    He does not bulk bill first time patients unless they have a concession card.
     
  4. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    In private practice I charged $125 for a consult to Medicare patients. That's what they "allowed" anyway. Followup visits were about $80. Patient would owe $25 or $16, which is 20%. Cheap. Nobody ever complained about it either.
     
  5. becca59

    becca59 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Have to use a sharps box here. They are handed into GP when full. Get those on prescription too. Ironically recreational drug addicts get a different coloured one which can be handed in at a pharmacy.
    Doesn’t sound like you use many needles. I get through roughly 150 a month. A new needle for each injection.
     
  6. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's about what my GP charges for a long consult over twenty minutes.
     
  7. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    18C ... you know the legislation. As for her / it, a full force gale response
     
  8. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Oh heavens no. I only injected Lantus once a day. I'd use a syringe probably 10 times. Until the needle bounced off lol. I change the pen needles when the pen runs out: 12 days for Lantus, about the same for Novorapid. I don't think any diabetics use sharps containers here. And junkies can't buy sterile needles, which is stupid. I have to write a prescription for them. You can buy some types of vials of insulin without a prescription but not the needles you have to use. Go figure.
     
  9. Bertyboy

    Bertyboy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Is it necessary to change the needles every single time? I change mine once a day so they're only doing 2/3 injections each normally (split basal).
    Anyway, I can't really comment on people's behaviour too much as I've only been injecting for three weeks, but I've bolused a few times in restaurants but not noticed anyone looking.
     
  10. QPR4Me

    QPR4Me Type 2 · Member

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    Thank God/FSM that we have the NHS in the UK. My treatment experience is far better than what you seem to have received. Add to that, I have long since given up trying to be subtle about my injections, and will never sneak off to the toilet areas of restaurants or bars to inject. If someone looks at me while I'm injecting, I just think, I hope you're not squeamish , then carry on doing what I need to stay alive. The last time someone fainted in front of me was when I was in an A&E Dept after my mum had been taken seriously ill. I injected before eating some food and a guy with a suspect broken wrist was fascinated by what I was doing, until I injected in my stomach. He promptly passed out and hit the deck, to the vast amusement of his mates. I just thought, tough, serves you right for looking. It seems that Victoria seems to be home to some people with some pretty primitive ideas, probably not evolved much from those who burned "witches" at the stake!

    As for my sharps box. I just phone my local council (Wandsworth) and they send a chap round in a van to collect my full one and drop off a new container for me to use. Very civilised indeed.

    Perhaps some re-education of people is needed in Aus, so that people realise the important differences between a skanky, druggy junkie and us Insulin Junkies! Good luck!
     
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  11. DaveTC

    DaveTC Type 1 · Active Member

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    It's best practice to change your needle every time, reduces the risks of lipohypertrophy and it's more hygienic. I'm sure most people reuse them at least once in a while, whether it's forgetting to have enough with you or the odd correction shot you weren't expecting.
     
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  12. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Active Member

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    A similar service was / is available in the CBD except they collect on foot. I tried to use it a number of years ago, I was rejected as I'm not a Junkie, they only pick up syringes and replace with new syringes. Remember all our ancestors were the UK's criminals :) . I'm no wilting flower, I have taken on Federal and state politicians. My Program Director at work left a pair of boxing gloves she found on my desk yesterday. However with D it's pointless upsetting and offending people. It could also backfire on all Insulin injecting Diabetics
     
  13. Cobia

    Cobia LADA · Member

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    Sorry first post.

    @Chowie what shopping centers are the problem?

    I havn't been to Melb since the safe injecting rooms have started.

    Makes me shudder to think of the mentality of the citys....


    Been reading the forum for nearly 2 years now.

    Most people i see arnt like this......
     
  14. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    More than anything it's a carryover from what's done in hospitals and clinics. Same with using an alcohol wipe to cleanse the injection site. I've never used one, but I'm pretty clean lol. I don't think using a sterile needle every time would affect lipohypertrophy at all. Throwing needles away multiple times a day just seems like such a waste to me. It's not like you'll get an infection at the injection site if you reuse it.
     
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  15. DaveTC

    DaveTC Type 1 · Active Member

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    I've never used a wipe, yes infection risks for the majority are pretty low.
    Needle sterility might not affect lipohypertrophy, but I've always been told how blunt they are does. There's a lot of factors that can affect how likely you are to get it, and personally I've found I get a lot less injection related lumps since changing needles more regularly.
     
  16. lmc

    lmc Type 1 · Active Member

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    Wow, they all sound crazy. I live in UK and get sharps boxes delivered to my house and collected by the local council. Years ago before sharps bins, I was told to put used syringes and needles in drinks container and seal it before disposing of it. I am on animal insulin and use syringes. I could get pens but I like syringes. I usually inject in toilets but odd times have to inject in public and try to be discrete. Most people do not notice. Occasionally people ask if I am diabetic. If they stare, I tell them I am diabetic and they seem happy with that. I have no idea how you could tell them if they do not speak the same language.
     
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