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Invokana

Discussion in 'Diabetes Medication and Drugs' started by SusanKershaw, Jul 12, 2017.

  1. SusanKershaw

    SusanKershaw · Newbie

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    Hello. I have just been to see doctor and my bloods have gone up from 6 to 9. I am putting on weight and no diet is helping me so she suggested i take Invokana 100mg. I am also on Metformin SR 2000mg a day atorvostatin 40mg 1 a day and ramipril 5mg a day. My question is I have never tested my blood sugars and was wondering how do I know these tablets are working. I have been on Invokana for 1 week and have lost 6lb already which is pleasing. Only symptoms so far are tiredness and nausea but combating the sickness feeling by drinking ginger tea, so far so good. If I am to test my own bloods should a nurse show me how to do my readings and which machine would I choose as there are so many out there.
     
  2. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @SusanKershaw , welcome to the forum. I would ask your nurse for a meter. She may say no but it's worth a try.

    There are video's on the website of this forum on how to test your blood sugar and also videos online. It's really easy and most new meters come with detailed instructions.

    I will ask @AM1874 to send you links to popular meters on the forum. Have you had the advice from the moderator @daisy1 which details NICE targets for testing?

    Please feel free to ask any question on the forum about testing, most of us test and can help you with any questions.
     
  3. Ann1982

    Ann1982 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I tried invokana but it did not agree it's me. I am now on LCHFdiet and have lost more weight on it than I ever did with anything else. As for a meter, I believe you should always test, how else would you learn what foods affect you and how your bloods are reacting. When purchasing a meter if you do not get the strips on prescription remember the cost of the strips are sometimes prohibitively expensive. Many people here use the TEE2 or the Code free. Just google them to find the sites. There will be more people here to give you advice and help. Just ask questions. Also have a look at the low carb programme and as for testing there are loads of videos on YouTube to assist.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  4. AM1874

    AM1874 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @SusanKershaw .. and welcome
    You have certainly made a good move coming here. Since joining this forum, the folks here have given me so much info, advice and support that I am now much more confident about the journey ahead. So ask your questions and be assured that you will receive the answers that you need. It can all seem uphill to start with but, in my experience, it gets easier .. very quickly.

    The key point to take on board is that managing and controlling your diabetes (or pre-diabetes) through exercise, diet and testing your Blood Glucose seems to be the best way forward for many people. For me, committing to an LCHF (Low Carb High Fat) lifestyle and testing 3-5 times a day seems to be working and you'll find that there is a wealth of info, relevant advice and positive support about LCHF on the forum ..

    I see that @Alison Campbell has already tagged @ daisy1 for you and I suggest that you read up on the Low Carb Program in the information that @ daisy1has sent you. You might also find the discussion on the Low Carb Diet forum helpful .. and the following Diet Doctor websites ...
    Low Carb Intro and Information
    Low Carbs in 60 Seconds

    If your Doc does not give you a test meter, it is a top priority that you get yourself one and, for this, the following websites might help:
    https://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/
    for the SD Codefree meter, which costs £12.98 or:
    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-blood-glucose-meter/
    who distribute the TEE 2 meter, which is free.

    I have both which I alternate for comparative purposes and I have never found any significant difference between them.
    The costs of testing comes down to the ongoing charges for test strips and lancets. Make sure that you tick the appropriate box on the on-line order form and you won't pay VAT on the cost of your meter or strips.
    For the SD Codefree, the strips are £7.69 for a pack of 50 and there are discount codes available for bulk purchases:
    5 packs x 50 use code: 264086 .. cost is £38.45
    10 packs x 50 use code: 975833 .. cost is £76.90
    For the TEE 2, the strips are £7.75 for a pack of 50 .. there are no discount codes currently available for bulk buys
    I'm testing 3-5 times a day which works out at around £10 to £12 per month for either of the two packages above but, more importantly, I know what my BG levels are .. and I can now manage them

    Hope this helps
     
  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @SusanKershaw

    Hello Susan and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope it will be useful to you. Ask questions when you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 245,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  6. SusanKershaw

    SusanKershaw · Newbie

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    Thank you Alison
     
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  7. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    Please ask for a meter which tests for ketones too. Canagliflozin nearly caused me to have DKA. Its well documented as a risk so please be aware!
     
    • Like Like x 1
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