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Long-term healthy diet linked with lower risks of death

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Jul 17, 2017 at 10:52 PM.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    A new study has found that improving the diet is a marathon, not a sprint, for which consistency is the key. The research suggests that maintaining the healthiest diet as possible for at least 12 years can lead to improvements in risk factors for heart disease, a common complication of diabetes, as well as risks for death. According to researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, improving the diet by only 20 per cent over 12 years leads to an 8 to 17 per cent decrease in death. Conversely, when the quality of the diet gradually goes down, there is a surge in mortality risks, up to between 6 and 12 per cent. The findings, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, suggest that people who maintain a good diet over 12 years decrease their risks of death by 9 to 14 per cent. The researchers examined data on 47,994 women in the Nurses' Health Study and 25,745 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study from 1998 through 2010. Changes in the diet over the 12 years were assessed using Alternate Mediterranean Diet (AMD) scores, the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet score, the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and others. Here, the AMD, DASH and AHEI represent what researchers consider to be good eating patterns, which also happen to be fairly easy to follow and sustain. The participants completed food frequency questionnaires with information on diet at the start and every four years for 12 years. They also recorded yearly information on lifestyle and risk factors for heart disease, including smoking, oral contraceptive use, and diabetes markers. The researchers used statistical models to find out the effect of each different diet change when maintained more than 10 years on total and cause-specific mortality. When researchers analysed people with the AHEI score, those with a greater increase in diet quality were more active and consumed less alcohol. When analysed against the DASH score, healthier eaters had a lower Body Mass Index (BMI) 12 years later. With just a 13 to 33 per cent increase in diet quality over a 12-year period, the risk of death was lower by 14% when assessed with the AHEI, 11% with the AMD, and 9% with DASH. Overall, all diets examined in this study led to some degree of improvement in lifespan, but it is not necessary to conform to a single diet to achieve a healthy eating pattern, as long as you keep improving it. There is one caveat to the findings, which is that most participants in the study were health professionals themselves, who were possibly already concerned about diet. What's interesting about this study is that it shows healthy diets tend to share common features, including higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes, and lower intakes of red and processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, and refined grains.

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  2. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Did Harvard seriously do a study to find a relationship between eating properly and not dying early. My goodness...
     
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  3. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    It was like the research last week (again reported by Newsbot) that said people who attend regular health checks have a better life-expectancy over those that don't...............:rolleyes:

    Here's a link to that Harvard study @GrantGam

    https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/p...ime-linked-with-reduced-risk-premature-death/

    Edit for spelling error.
     
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    #3 noblehead, Jul 19, 2017 at 1:10 PM
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2017 at 1:21 PM
  4. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    I always thought that the trouble with epidemialogical studies on diet were that you couldn't rely on the studied telling you the truth. That would be the study of studies. Who confesses to everything when they answer a questionnaire.
     
  5. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    No s**t Sherlock............. :wacky: :hilarious:
     
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  6. Avocado Sevenfold

    Avocado Sevenfold Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They needn't have bothered as people only believe what they want to believe anyway :bookworm:
     
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  7. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You always pick the best emoji's @Avocado Sevenfold:)
     
  8. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    :D
     
  9. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I mean honestly................. I just had to say it :D
     
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  10. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    Although a 'healthy diet' has long been associated with lower risk of heart disease etc., it might not be the diet itself that's causing the lower risk. There's always the possibility that some other factor e.g. wealth or education reduces the risk but also makes eating a 'healthy diet' more likely. The difference with this study is that long-term changes in the diet seemed to change the risk while, presumably, other factors stayed the same.

    I never mind studies that investigate what seem to be obvious relationships. Sometimes 'everybody knows' something so it's not tested for years until one day it's found out that what seemed obvious was actually wrong.
     
  11. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds a bit like the "Eatwell plate"
     
  12. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Well, there we have it.
     
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