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low carb muscle gaining

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by static192, Nov 4, 2016.

  1. static192

    static192 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    hi i want to start training as in weight training i want to ask is it possible to bulk up and build muscle mass on a low carb diet ?
     
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  2. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    You might find it difficult. A non-diabetic bodybuilder would tend to low carb in order to lose excess weight after a bulking phase.

    Whether it's possible to bulk without an important macronutrient like carbohydrates is unlikely. Probably not impossible, but you're likely to find it a lot harder/get lesser results without the carbs.
     
  3. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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  4. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    well as a type 2 person trying to build mucles on a daily intake of about 80-max 125 grams of carbs , I find it no problem at all.... actually I build mucle on my very low calory diet of about 1000 calories in average, though the days I excercise I eat more than the other days... but a the moment it seems I build mucles instead of loosing... which is a riddle to me how that can actually happen instead of loosing weight...

    But I think it will vary from one person to the other... but I have been wondering if it is in fact an avantage to be type 2 diabetic... as the glucose seems to be higher in my blood than it would be in normal healthier persons.. my sugar just never get really low... not even under very many hours of excercising like 4.5 hours... a bit crazy I think , even when I didn´t eat any carbs at all before excercise

    And I have only been a Little tired , mostly my body is very tired , but not my brain ... very weird ....
     
    #4 Freema, Nov 4, 2016 at 6:29 PM
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2016
  5. qe5rt

    qe5rt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I would start on the low side of the carb intake and slowly raise it while keeping your BS levels under control. You also need a callorie surplus in order to gain muscle. Taking out a complete marco nutrient makes this more difficult while it's already difficult and then i'm not even talking about having diabetes which makes it even more challenging. You also can't go overboard on protein as it will effect you so you're not getting your calories from there neither. That only leaves fat and no mater how you twist and turn it, it will never be as effective as carbs.

    Try to find out the minimum amount of carbs you need, just start low either on the low end of the recommended spectrum or pick a certain amount whichever you like best. You'll notice when you're too low, you'll get fatigued faster during sets especially on higher intensity (or with a high RPE). Slightly raise it until you find the sweat spot (pun intended :D) where your BS levels are stable and you get steady gains. In the beginning muscle gains will be fast, this will slow down after a few months and around that time a proper diet that promotes muscle gains is imperative. Also don't forget to sleep, something often forgotten and especially important when trying to build muscle.

    Also in sport nutrition low carb is considered when you get less than 20% of your daily callorie needs from carbs. It's doable i'm at around 25-30% but the downside of this is that i need to get my extra calories from fat. Which is going to be about 45-50% of my daily calories from fat, mostly unsaturated and a bit saturated. Depending on your weight that's easily something like 500 grams of cheese per day.

    With this all said keeping your BS levels under control is very important also when it comes down to building muscle. If you had to make a choice between higher carbs and unstable BS levels or low carbs and stable BS levels, the later is going to be better for building muscle in the long run. But if you were to get enough carbs and be able to control your BS levels then i'm certain your gains would be optimal. This is achievable through routine in both eating and training habits and closely monitoring your BS levels especially in the beginning. Whichever way you choose good luck and remember that consistency and discipline yields great results, it takes years to develop of great physique.
     
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  6. benford

    benford Type 2 · Member

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    The way I had it explained is muscle weighs heavier than fat and muscle is better equipped to deal with the glucose as the insulin you do produce is more effective when you have more muscle,That is why resistance training or weight training is good for you.Better to reduce visceral fat and produce muscle even if you put a little weight on.It would probably be better explained somewhere on the internet in a more scientific way.
     
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  7. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    yes I do look much leaner now even when not loosing weight
     
  8. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    First of all, it's really REALLY hard to gain muscle. Even professional body builders are happy to gain 12lbs of muscle in a given year which equates to 1lbs/month.

    There are a number of reasons people THINK they're gaining lean mass and most of them are attributed to your muscles retaining more fluids or losing fat to make your muscles seem more noticeable. While both are normally good, they're not to be confused with true lean mass gains.

    Is it scientifically possible to gain lean mass (muscle) on a very low carb diet? Yes. However, if you're asking that question then, PRACTICALLY speaking, no it's not. It's a very complex and dedicated process under most circumstances and certainly not "Easy" as others mentioned.
     
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  9. benford

    benford Type 2 · Member

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    After a break of approx. 18 mths from the gym through injury and moving house ,This week I start back at the gym,On Thursday I am having a one to one with the fitness instructor who is aware of my type 2 diabetes.Before my enforced lay off I was doing 2 and a half hours per day cardio/resistance split on 5 days a week.I feel full of trepidation and nervousness having been a regular gym goer for two years and experienced the weight loss and waist reduction it is a bit of a weird feeling a cross between excitement and fear stomachs churning thinking about it.
     
  10. benford

    benford Type 2 · Member

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    I am back at the gym now after a long lay off,But prior to my injury I was exercising 5 days a week 2and a half hours per day.At first I lost a lot of weight and reduced my waistline by 6 inches.When my weight loss slowed down my shape started to change and started to look more toned ,At 63 I didn't expect to make a great deal of muscle in the Scharzeneeger sense but was quite happy with the way things were going.Oh well back to square one again.
     
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  11. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    good you are back again... I have also started to loose again, which I am happy for, as I really have a lot more to loose... but keep on excercising , one of my neighbours couldn´t almost recognize me... so that was a funny meating.. I now look much more like i used to, and at that time I was also relativly okay with my looks... so now in a much older version but back to someone I like to see in my mirror
     
  12. CzukayFan

    CzukayFan Type 2 · Member

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    I started training with weights when I became diabetic at 50 years of age, five years ago. I'm 5'5" and weighed around 120 lbs. At first I was following a balanced diet as recommended by the mainstream medical system but I was upping my proteins and basically overeating every macro nutrient in an attempt to get healthy and put on weight, I certainly wasn't your stereotypical diabetic. I put on a lot of muscle (relatively) and got up to 136 lbs but my blood sugars were a mess as was my cholesterol. I cut back on my carbs dramatically and lost weight and muscle and strength but my A1C started coming down (I don't use any medications). I couldn't get them low enough for my liking (low 6's typically) until I went keto. I've been training 5-6 days a week and weigh 122 now with a 6.3% body fat (if you can believe those scales) and my A1C is at 5.8.
    With 2000-3000 calories per day and training fairly hard doing a 5 day split routine I have trouble putting on weight but know that more carbs would definitely help with that. I've chosen my health over putting on weight is what it boils down to and feel great with my choice. I look much better now even though I've only put on two pounds, so weight training will improve your physique even if you don't put on a lot of weight in the conventional bodybuilding sense.
    Good luck, it's a lot of fun regardless.
     
  13. Sean01

    Sean01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    Trained as a body builder since the age of 18. Got to national junior/intermediate level and then missed the bus but run over by the car overtaking the bus (24-10-86 - true story)
    I have a biology degree - most of my text books magically opened on sections that helped me with my sport - yes even the biochem text book!! Since graduating, I haven't stopped learning although there have been huge gaps in my life where I didn't exercise. Then in 20015 I became T2 - time to get serious.

    Step 1 - I read up on Tim Belknap - pro Mr USA from mid 90's, short - 5ft5 but a giant of a man and diabetic. It can be done!

    Step 2 - sort out the eating plan and the goals

    Step 3 - back in the gym. I favour the one set to failure approach although it is massively misunderstood - read up on Dorian Yates and read his book - it explains it all.

    I morphed from building muscle to building muscle and strength - I train at a gym which primarily caters for power lifters, olympic lifters and strong men. I've fallen into strong man training and love it.

    I'm still building muscle at the age of 53. Drug free and low carb. For the first time in my life I have traps!! and my thighs and calves have never been so big also I have thickness in my back like never before.

    Tip: one thing I have found over the last year - nothing builds muscle like strong man exercises. I'm no expert - luckily I have coaches who are, but I would say my size and thickness is down to Farmers walks, Yoke and Prowler. In fact Prowler has done more for my hamstrings in the last year than a lifetime of leg curls and deadlifts.

    Good luck
     
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