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Discussion in 'Greetings and Introductions' started by caitlinx, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. caitlinx

    caitlinx Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hi everyone!

    I’m 22 and I’m from Glasgow. I was diagnosed with type one on 6th September this year after becoming very ill pretty suddenly. I spent five days in hospital and since then i feel like having diabetes has basically taken over my life and stopped me doing and enjoying some of the things I used to. I went to a course last week where I talked to some other people who were in the same position as me and it really helped so I thought signing up for this forum would be a good idea. To be honest anytime i just think in my head that this is something I’m going to have to deal with for the rest of my life I could still just break down. There’s still a lot I’m hoping to learn so that’s why I’m here, I look forward to reading and interacting with people on here

    Caitlin
     
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  2. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Expert

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    Hi Caitlin and welcome.. there is a large cohort of very experienced Type 1's on the site who I'm sure will be happy to answer any questions you might have.. they'll be along soon I'm sure.. in the meantime hello and welcome again.
     
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  3. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Welcome to the forums @caitlinx ,

    The early days can be a shocker but you get used to it (believe it or not). You'll probably find that you will always be learning about diabetes, but with knowledge comes control.

    I cannot pretend that it doesn't take some of the spontinaiety out of things but as time goes on you are better prepared for the odd curveball. But try not to let 'it' stop you from doing whatever it is you are planning to do with your life.

    Have a look around the forums and ask as many questions as you like, we're here to help. Also take a look at the information pages on the front end of website, there's a lot of good stuff in there.

    Good luck.
     
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  4. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Caitlin. I am trying my best not to give direct advice to Type 1s as there are clear differences with Type 2 and there are lots of very experienced Type 1s here who can really help you. I responded because I am diabetic but also because, like you, I am a Glaswegian...and we are such lovely people ! We may well have seen the same professionals.. Anyway, good luck getting in control if it all (which with the help you will get here, you will stand a much better chance of managing). I have tagged the wonderful @daisy1 who will provide some really good info, but I'd urge you to ask questions here and to keep doing so. You are not alone, pal.
     
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  5. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @caitlinx

    Hello Caitlin and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you want and someone willl be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 276,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  6. Mike D

    Mike D Type 2 · Expert

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    @caitlinx. You WILL be fine so hang around. Worth it :) Welcome :)
     
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  7. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, @caitlinx , and welcome to the forum!

    All those feelings you're having are perfectly normal. It might not seem like it at the moment, but they won't last forever. You'll reach a point where you'll realise, aye, ok, I've got this sussed, I can do this.

    After you've learned a bit more about how insulin, food and exercise work together, I suspect you'll be surprised about how unrestricted your life will be.

    I was dx'd about the same age as you (and, by coincidence, the symptoms first developed while I was studying in Glasgow) and I had all these thoughts like, oh no, I'll just be eating "special diabetic food" for the rest of my life.

    You're maybe on a fixed dose regime at the moment, and that can be quite limiting. But, give it time, the docs are just doing that to reduce the variables involved to let them figure out a few things and to make it more predictable for you in these early days.

    But, as time goes by, you'll start learning about how to assess yourself how much insulin is needed for each meal, and the timing of it, and that will make you able to confidently walk into any of the fine establishments in Byres Road/Ashton Lane, and make your own mind up about what you're going to eat, where and when.

    That brings back a lot of the freedom which you might be missing at the moment. Heck, you'll be able to have a few beers and finish off with a Scoobie snack from the Maggie van outside the Botanics at the end of the night if you want!

    I'm not going to say it's all going to be a doddle - there's a lot to learn and think about, T1 has an unpredictable aspect to it, and hypos aren't much fun, but, with a bit of time, you figure out little tips and tricks which makes it much, much easier than it seems right now.

    You can find ways of co-operating with it. That might seem a strange word to use - co-operation - but I try to think of it as a bit of my body has stopped working, so I need to help it, me, out. So I'm helping it, not fighting it. A little nudge up with some sugar if I'm going too low, a little nudge down with insulin if I'm going too high.

    I dwelt a lot on the "it's for life" angle too after dx. But even that faded after I figured out how to use insulin and food properly and realised, yep, it's for life, but it's going to be a damned good life. I'm 30 years into this now, been away backpacking, held down a professional career, go out for a curry and beer when I feel like it. There is no reason why T1 should hold you back.

    Plus, you've got the advantage of being a gallus Glasgow gal, so if T1 gets you down, you can just hit it with some weegie attitude! You'll be fine, Caitlin.
     
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  8. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    mmm...Scoobie snacks...the Maggie van...fried egg rolls...a blast from the past...is it still there @Scott-C ?
     
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  9. Diakat

    Diakat Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Morning hen! Nice to meet you.
     
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  10. Bud1979

    Bud1979 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hello Caitlinx don’t worry about it, it just means you’ve got to adopt a slightly different attitude / approach, you’ll read labels more, become aware of good things, that’s not to say you can’t have nice things all you do is count them into your regime which will fall into place quickly, nothing stops, changes or alters other than how you approach it, complications might never occur but the better controlled you are the less chance, I’ve had type 1 for twice your lifetime and I feel very lucky sure I’ve had ups and downs, but I’ve known people I went to school with had worse than me and I’m still here ( Glasgow) I love it when it rains oh wait that’s summer. Onwards and upwards. Why does sugar free gum raise my blood sugar so much ? Ah one of life’s great problems, take care
     
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  11. Bud1979

    Bud1979 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Is it not rolls and egg ? As a native of Govan but never a student ( except school where I was asked to leave, not expelled) that’s how I would say it, only a thought .
     
  12. Scott-C

    Scott-C Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I'm not entirely sure! Although I'm just along the road at the civilised end of the M8 (ducks for cover!!) I've not been out on the town in Glasgow for a couple of years now. I'm pretty sure it was there the last time I was there.

    It's a bit of a Glasgow institution, up there with Rogano and Babbity Bowsters.

    Last lived in Glasgow about 15 years ago in Clouston Street, so it was handily placed on the way home...aye, ok, it's 2am, one of them scoobies'll do me just fine..
     
  13. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was born in Govan...and you definitely have point there... I actually would ask for a roll and egg; I think teaching in England for a few years really messed with my soul even more than I had realised. The rot started when none of the kids knew what jotters were...all downhill from there. ;)
     
  14. pleinster

    pleinster Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Similarly, I've not been in Glasgow for a long time now I'm out in Stirlingshire's sticks but on the way home from Byres Road to Garrioch Road...yum.
     
  15. Bud1979

    Bud1979 Type 1 · Active Member

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    Hehe we get everywhere. I would imagine that in far flung exotic places there’s a wee bundle of drunken rags that is usually a Scotsman ( usually a Govanite )
     
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  16. paulus1

    paulus1 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    be patient your still new to this. once youve got the hang of things it should not affect your life too much. obviously it will alwaysbe there but you will learn what you can and cant do. i promise you your life is not over and it can be just as much fun. we all go through black patches not get too upset. you will cope. ps what degree did you do. and welcome to the forum. the older folks that have had it for 50 plus years will tell you life goes on. your still you. unless you have a chronic sherbet addicton there should be nothing off limits.
     
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  17. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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