1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Forum slowness issues have been logged and are being investigated! App users seem to be unaffected. Thanks for your patience.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Newbie type2.

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by James1968, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Hi, just been diagnosed with type 2 in December 16, really struggling with it at the moment
     
    • Hug Hug x 2
    • Informative Informative x 1
  2. peter.s

    peter.s Type 2 · Member

    Messages:
    47
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Hi james1968
    I'm in same boat mate diagnosed typ2 beginning of December I've been struggling to but you will get great advice on this forum the members are great and have a wealth of knowledge and experience so any questions just ask them
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 2
  3. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Yeah thanks for that.
    I am finding it really hard at the moment with tablets and the side effects that go with them
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  4. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Hi James
    Sorry to hear you feel you are struggling. Yes, it's a lot to get your head around and it will take some time so just 'chill' a bit and take it a day at a time.

    Can you tell us what you feel you are specifically struggling with? Perhaps if you tell us a bit more about what your HbA1c was at diagnosis, what, if any, medication have you been prescribed and what advice have you had so far from your GP/surgery Nurse?

    The chances are that you have been told to eat re the EatWell Plate but the EatWell Plate is for everyone, whether sick, healthy or diabetic so most of us here feel it's too carbohydrate-heavy, seeing as it's carbohydrates (including sugar) that puts our blood sugar levels up so the general advice here is to significantly reduce foods, such as bread, potatoes, pasta, rice, grains, flour so includes cakes, pastry etc too. "What's left?" I hear you cry. Well, actually, there are a lot of lovely foods left but based more on protiens and fats, vegetables, some fruits ie raspberries, strawberries, blueberries etc. If you do eat bread, for instance, try to choose a low GI version as it will be less likely to spike your sugar levels. I'm tagging @daisy1, who will post some valuable information which is worth a good read.

    The other thing you may have been told is that "Type 2s don't need to test". Well, we disagree with that and feel it's very important to test if you want to avoid, as much as possible, any/all longer-term complications. Test, test, test to see what foods (carbs) affect your blood glucose levels so as you can avoid them as much as possible.

    The SDCodeFree meter is the most reasonably priced and the test strips are the cheapest, which is important to bear in mind as you will have to fund these yourself, most likely.

    You can buy here
    https://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/codefree-blood-glucose-monitoring-system-mmoll-or-mgdl/

    There are also some codes which will reduce the price of the test strips, which one of the members here will post them for you, hopefully. I'm afraid I don't have a note of them.

    We've all been newly diagnosed at some time or other, so do ask your questions. As Peter.s has already mentioned, there is a wealth of experience and knowledge on here which is readily shared. Just keep reading the forum ... ;)
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Informative Informative x 1
  5. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Energise thanks
    I am on metformin x3 gliclazide X1 and simvastain X1
    Test bg at least 5 times per day
    Sore heads sore muscles toilet trips can't control bg everything seems to be an effort hope it does not get any worse
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  6. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,705
    Likes Received:
    26,318
    Trophy Points:
    158
    @James1968 - Hello and Welcome to the Forum :).

    Should you purchase a SD Codefree Blood Glucose Meter you need to state you are Diabetic for vat exemption.
    And here are the discount codes if you should buy in bulk.
    5 packs = 264086. 10 packs = 975833.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  7. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I do test and have a Acu-check performa mano is this what you are talking about
     
    • Like Like x 3
  8. Johnjoe13

    Johnjoe13 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    234
    Likes Received:
    600
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Hello James, just remember when ordering the meter to choose mmol/l and I'd order extra lancets and strips as the starter pack amounts that come with the meter will not last very long. I was put on Metformin late October after my HbA1C number went up following initial diagnosis in June, only been testing since mid December after finding this site and being advised to get a meter. This meter has helped me find out what foods and their amounts I eat that spike my numbers through testing just before I eat and 2hrs after. I've seen some improvement and know exactly what is bad for me. Admittedly on occasion if there is something I want to eat and is bad for me I go ahead and eat it, but like I said only occasionally and a smaller portion. I do feel it's good to treat yourself the odd time in moderation, but that's me and others may have a different opinion on that.

    As for your Meds I can't offer any advice as i'm not on as much as you but I'm sure once you get to grips with the devilish Carbs you will probably see an improvement in your numbers, and who knows maybe that will end up with a reduction in your meds. Do try to keep optimistic and not let this get you down
     
    • Like Like x 3
  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    11,325
    Likes Received:
    22,618
    Trophy Points:
    278
    If you remember that all carbohydrate converts to glucose once inside the system it will become clear that the more carbs you eat, the more glucose will be in your bloodstream and the worse you will feel. Potatoes, rice, pasta, bread, cereals and stuff made with flour are the worst culprits for most of us. Fruit and milk can also be difficult for us.

    Are you using your meter to test before and after eating (2 hours after first bite)? Keeping a food diary including portion sizes and recording these levels alongside will show you what your meals are doing to you. It may seem a big faff to do this, but it isn't difficult or time consuming, and is really the only way to learn. We all react differently to the same foods so you need to learn which foods you can eat and in what portion sizes, and which you need to eliminate.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Winner Winner x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  10. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    87
    Trophy Points:
    48
    If you are struggling with gastric effects from Metformin it isn't unusual for these to settle down after a few weeks especially on a lower carb diet. If they don't then there is an extended release version you can be put on that helps about half of people.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thanks Johnjoe13
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  12. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thanks Jay-Marc
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  13. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Will give that a go Bluetit1802 thanks
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  14. Prem51

    Prem51 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,418
    Likes Received:
    7,623
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi @James1968 and welcome to the forum. It is a shock when you get that diagnosis and it will take a bit of time to get your head around it all, but you will find a lot of good advice and support on this forum.
    Metafornin can cause bowel problems initially which should settle down after a couple of weeks, but if they persist you should ask your doctor for the Slow Release version which people find doesn't affect your stomach so much.
    Do you know what your HbA1c (blood sugar) figure was when you were diagnosed? If not you should ask your GP surgery so you know where you are starting from.
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  15. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thanks Prem51
    No sorry i don't know but I have another appointment with my GP in February which I will ask him what it was .
    I was on holiday the start of December on when o was testing my blood it was as high as 23 so that's when my metformin was moved to 3 times daily but I have since been as low as 4.7 some days so will wait and see what he says next time.
     
  16. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,112
    Likes Received:
    4,352
    Trophy Points:
    158

    It will get more normal the more you get used to how to live for yourself and your own health needs
     
    • Like Like x 1
  17. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Thanks mate just frustrating at the moment though
     
  18. Liam1955

    Liam1955 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,705
    Likes Received:
    26,318
    Trophy Points:
    158
    I assumed you did not have a meter, from another member posting about the SD Codefree - my Apologies.
     
  19. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    23,976
    Likes Received:
    4,268
    Trophy Points:
    228
    @James1968

    Hello James and welcome to the forum :) Here is the basic information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. It includes advice about carbs and levels and includes a link to the Low Carb Program which you might like to try. Ask as many questions as you need to and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 220,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  20. James1968

    James1968 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    209
    Trophy Points:
    43
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook