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Newly diagnosed by accident...

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by ExoticBehemoth, Oct 8, 2017.

  1. ExoticBehemoth

    ExoticBehemoth Type 2 · Member

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    I work in mental health and was assaulted by a patient.

    When the ambulance did their checks they found I had a blood sugar of 16.6 mol/l and a BP of 230/135 (although that calmed down or 140/110 later).

    They advised I see my GP and I was sent for fasting bloods and got a hbA1c of 104 and cholesterol of 5.9.

    Over a phone consultation my GP has started me on 500mg metformin three times a day and atorvastatin. (I had a bit of a shock when I googled interactions) but has said he want to see if lifestyle changes will resolve my BP. I'm guessing he means lose weight through diet an exercise.

    I am hearing that I won't be entitled to testing equipment to monitor my blood sugars when I get my appointment though with the diabetic nurses.
    I've bought a BP monitor so I can check that. Is it possible to buy my own blood sugar testing kit and if so how much will it cost? I can't really see how I can check if the changes are making a difference otherwise.
     
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  2. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Yes, buy a blood glucose monitor, this will prove even more useful than your bp machine. I will tag @daisy1 who will post invaluable information to all those newly diagnosed.
     
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  3. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @ExoticBehemoth .When you are looking at the different types of BG monitor available take into account the cost of the strips. These are the on-going expense and you will get through a lot if it is to be any use to you with modifying your diet. Be prepared to keep a food and exercise diary, then test before a meal and two hours after you start to eat. The difference between the two readings should be less than 2, if it is more then there is something in the meal that you are reacting to. I was surprised to find that I could no longer tolerate wheat products, even if they are in with savoury foods. Also remember that each finger has two sides and to rotate the finger that you use to test.
    Walking is a cheap form of exercise and often does the trick with bringing down the BG, it has the advantage of not needing expensive equipment and can be fitted around other points in the day. We often mistake being busy with being active, but even standing rather than sitting makes a small difference.
     
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  4. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was unlucky in that I reacted badly to the medication you have been prescribed - but if you change what you eat to avoid high carbohydrate foods you should see your blood glucose drop rapidly. I was back to normal levels at the six month check, even though I stopped taking the tablets.
     
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  5. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi
    I bought one of these:
    https://homehealth-uk.com/all-products/codefree-blood-glucose-monitoring-system-mmoll-or-mgdl/
    There are links there to buy extra lances and testing strips.
    I bought 250 strips and 100 lances for just less than £50.
    I mentioned this previously on here and nobody shot me down in flames at the time so presumably they are a fairly sensible price and quality.
    They do mmol/l and a mg/dl meters. I got the former which I think is the right one for you based on your initial readings.
    According to far more experienced folk on here than me, the nurse / gp may tell you that you don't need a meter - but that's not so. Go ahead and test (before you eat and 2 hours after) to see what spikes your glucose.
    Good luck
     
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  6. AM1874

    AM1874 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Jo_the_boat ..
    A good choice .. and here's a bit more info on the SD Codefree meter for follow-up ..
    Meter costs £12.98
    Test strips are £7.69 for a pack of 50 and there are discount codes available for bulk purchases:
    5 packs x 50 use code: 264086 .. cost is £29.49
    10 packs x 50 use code: 975833 .. cost is £58.98
    Make sure that you tick the appropriate box on the on-line order form and you won't pay VAT on your meter or strips.

    Hope this helps
     
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  7. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the endorsement. Hope the OP spots it too.
    Looks like I paid a bit too much but it was a 'panic' buy as I wanted to get started.
     
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  8. AM1874

    AM1874 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    OOOPS .. a bit dozy this morning but I've now sent info to the OP as well :meh:
     
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  9. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No. That's the flaw in the NHS's cunning plan. You have to maintain your BG within range without knowing what it is. I use the SD Code free meter.
     
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  10. AM1874

    AM1874 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @ExoticBehemoth .. and welcome
    You have certainly made a good move coming here .. since joining this forum, the folks here have given me so much info, advice and support that I am now much more confident about the journey ahead. So ask your questions and be assured that you will receive the answers that you need. It can all seem uphill to start with but, in my experience, it gets easier .. very quickly.

    The key point to take on board now is that managing and controlling your diabetes through exercise, diet and testing your blood glucose seems to be the best way forward for many people. For me, committing to an LCHF (Low Carb High Fat) lifestyle and testing 3-5 times a day seems to be working and you'll find that there is a wealth of info, relevant advice and positive support about LCHF on the forum ..

    I see that @Guzzler has already tagged @ daisy1 for you and I suggest that you read up on the valuable information that she will soon be sending you. You might also find the discussion on the Low Carb Diet forum helpful .. together with the following Diet Doctor websites, which will give you all the info that you need on what and what not to eat ...
    Low Carb Intro and Information and Low Carbs in 60 Seconds

    Unless you are given one by your Doc or Nurse (unlikely), it is a top priority that you get yourself a test meter and, for this, the following websites might help: (note: I have already posted some of this info above in reply to @Jo_the_boat)
    https://homehealth-uk.com/product-category/blood-glucose/
    for the SD Codefree meter, which costs £12.98 or:
    http://spirit-healthcare.co.uk/product/tee2-blood-glucose-meter/
    who distribute the TEE 2 meter, which is free.
    I have both which I alternate for comparative purposes and I have never found any significant difference between them.

    The costs of testing comes down to the ongoing charges for test strips and lancets. Make sure that you tick the appropriate box on the on-line order form and you won't pay VAT on your meter or strips.
    For the SD Codefree, the strips are £7.69 for a pack of 50 and there are discount codes available for bulk purchases:
    5 packs x 50 use code: 264086 .. cost is £29.49
    10 packs x 50 use code: 975833 .. cost is £58.98
    For the TEE 2, the strips are £7.75 for a pack of 50 .. but there are no discount codes currently available

    I'm testing 3-5 times a day, which works out at around £10 to £12 per month for either of the two packages above I test fasting blood sugar, then before meals and two hours afterwards .. this enables me to check which (if any) foods give me "spikes" and to monitor trends over time. More importantly, I now know what my BG levels are .. and I can now manage them levels are .. and I can now manage them

    Hope this helps
     
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  11. ExoticBehemoth

    ExoticBehemoth Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for all the quick responses. A lot to think about. A high fat diet seems counter intuitive with the high cholesterol...
    lots of research needed.
     
  12. Jo_the_boat

    Jo_the_boat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  13. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @ExoticBehemoth

    Hello ExoticBehemoth and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope you will find it useful. Ask as many questions as you like and someone will be able to help.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEWLY DIAGNOSED DIABETICS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 250,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates
    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 145,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - a free 10 week structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Take part in Diabetes.co.uk digital education programs and improve your understanding. They're all free.
    • Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    • Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
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  14. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello. I hope you have recovered from both the incident and the shock of diabetes and hypertension. There is a great deal you can do about both of these things and . Many of us on here have both.

    Deep breath, dont panic and start reading! It is the reading that will change your life. It has certainly changed mine. Read loads of threads on here and see how cholesterol does indeed come down on a lchf diet. However, the hf part does not mean chugging downs loads of lard, more like going back to the amount of fats commonly eaten pre war before the low fat diet was mistakenly launched.

    As to taking metformin interacting with a drug that has also been given to you. The same thing has happened to me. Neither of the gps I have seen even knew that my medications interacted. You will have to keep an eye on this yourself. My pharmacist did know about it and has been helpful.

    I have been amazed at how much our gps do not know. And even more amazed at thier reaction when I have said " no, thats not right" when they have tried to tell me something that is incorrect. An example would be when I informed then about the drug interaction. Both gps basically ignored what I said. Did not even acknowledge that I had said anything. They must really hate informed patients.

    Anyway, good luck with it all, keep reading, make your own mind up on which approach to take and test, test test!!!
     
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  15. Element137

    Element137 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome, have a good read of the various forums on here, you will see a number of really effective approaches people have made, see the success stories, you will quickly see that after the initial shock you can get this under control very quickly. Reference the counter intuitive 'fat bad for cholesterol levels' again - have a read around on here, prepare to unlearn a lot of what you may currently understand about nutrition. Best advice, get a meter, test and record results, eliminate food that spikes your levels - 'eat to your meter' - its also a tremendously powerful motivation when you see the immediate result of dietary choice - good luck, ask any questions you want - benefit of this site is we are all in similar situations and you can draw on real experience of managing this condition.
     
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  16. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    You may find that a low carb diet helps to bring down your bg. The high fat part I prefer to refer to as healthy fats, that means eating additional oily fish, olives and a limited amount of dairy. IF you eat too much then the inevitable additional calories will stop the weight loss but if you keep it moderate then will lose weight slowly with the additional exercise you will be taking. The only way you will know what you can and can not eat any more is by testing and recording.
     
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  17. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

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    For too many years we have all been brainwashed about fat and cholesterol, and it is hard to get your head round, but it is all old science and the NHS hasn't yet caught up with the new science.

    You don't even know if you have high cholesterol until you analyse the breakdown. The total cholesterol is just that - the total of the good, the bad, the not so bad and the awful. Do you know the breakdown? That is, the HDL/LDL/Triglycerides? If not, I urge you to find out before believing you have high cholesterol! Did your doctor discuss this with you?

    Please have a good read round about it - use the search box on the forum and find all the many threads on cholesterol and especially on statins. There are many links to important research and videos from eminent doctors on the subject. Then you can make up your own mind.

    Lifestyle changes will benefit not just your blood pressure, but also your blood glucose and cholesterol.
     
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  18. CherryAA

    CherryAA Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    When you do get you cholesterol figures you may find that it contains low HDL and high Triglycerides. Thats the reverse of what you want ! - but never fear, following the advice on here, you will soon get them to start switching round - it may look like a magic trick to your doctor, especially when you then tell him you started eating healthy fats, including butter, lard, coconut oil and avocado oil :) . welcome to the whacky world where most of what you think you know seems to be standing on its head :)
     
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  19. lowedb

    lowedb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I had 'high' cholesterol too on diagnosis. Triglycerides were pretty high. But that was before I changed to LCHF. Now all of my numbers are in the NHS acceptable range. So for me the HF did not make cholesterol worse, but improved it.
     
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  20. ExoticBehemoth

    ExoticBehemoth Type 2 · Member

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    I’ve been using a sucralose based sweetener for ages, pre diagnosis, but when I read the label now 100g of it is 94g carbs. Does this mean I can’t use it?
     
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