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Newly diagnosed, scared and confused

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Red_river_, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Hiitsme

    Hiitsme Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Red_river_
    Enjoy your holiday.
    You would seem to be making sensible choices in reducing carbs, The reason I found a meter helpful was that I could see what carbs I could eat and which ones I needed to avoid. We are all different. You don't have to use a meter but like @Prem51 said waiting for your next HbA1c can be a long time to know if things are working for you. I've been almost a year since my last HbA1c so I like to check on my meter to see my levels aren't rising, and when they do I try to do something about it fairly quickly. There are so many different ways people use to try and control diabetes and you have to find a way that works for you.
    Hope your appointment with the nurse goes well.
     
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  2. Sue192

    Sue192 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am also not testing - that may change after the next test results in about two weeks' time - but like @Grateful went straight into low-carb and as much research as I could get my head around without it exploding. My GP didn't give me the HbA1c readings as perhaps they were not very high, but I will definitely ask this time: I hadn't a clue about anything at the time of diagnosis. Cut out as many carbs as possible, and also try this on holiday if you can (a good test) - you'll be amazed what you are able to eat and still not feel deprived. Also, listen to the advice from the members here; they have a wealth of experience. And don't worry about the person with diabetes/diabetic/have diabetes thing - doesn't bother me what I'm called! - as you have enough to take in at the moment.
     
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  3. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It does work for me. At the risk of repeating myself, it is not an option I would necessarily recommend for others as we are so different. Here is why I do it this way:
    • It is a calculated risk; I am happy taking it but others will have good reasons for being more cautious (personality and/or concrete medical circumstances). Among other things, my HbA1c results must be masking some fairly large daily or hourly swings in blood glucose, and it is possible that these are harming my health even though the average over three months has settled at at a steady 30 (4.9%) for some time now.
    • I am on an extremely low-carb diet, somewhere around 30g/day. If I wanted to "experiment" by adding back some carbs, I would only want to do so in conjunction with self-testing. Three months is too long to wait for the results, and besides, I would not know which of the carb-laden foods were the problem!
    • If my initial "campaign" on a low-carb diet had failed or had disappointing results, adding self-testing would have made sense, but as it happens the A1c was brought to non-diabetic levels within the first 2.5 months.
    • Similarly, if my A1c deteriorates in future, that too would be a time to consider adding self-testing. It is supposed to be a "progressive disease" after all.
    • Finally, I eschewed self-testing because my doctor did not suggest it at diagnosis (or since), and I did not know better! Not prescribing self-testing does seem to be the "default option" for doctors both here in America and in the U.K. for newly diagnosed T2s and I just did what I was told!
    To each, his/her own path....
     
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  4. Red_river_

    Red_river_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am enjoying my holiday thank you, and I am still being sensible with food. Now I have a silly question : can you buy a meter that reads HbA1c at all? My sister in law has been a diabetic for a few year, she doesn't self test as GP didn't suggest. She only sees DN once a year to check HbA1c level as many others in this forum. If you do self testing, can you work out what your HbA1c is?
     
  5. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    The HBA1C is an average over 8-12 weeks, 24/7 and homes tests will just provide snap shot results around meals mostly so it's hard to compare with any accuracy. Although both are blood tests they are testing in different ways.

    There are apps that you can put your test results into and it can estimate your HBA1C , I think @Rachox tried this.

    To be honest when you have been testing for years you get a good idea how your tests at home will relate to your HBA1C.

    The website of this forum has some converters between home testing units and HBA1C so if you put in an average of your home tests in it would give an idea how that equates to HBA1C.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/hba1c-to-blood-sugar-level-converter.html

    If you used a continous monitoring device like the freestyle libre this will work out at estimated HBA1C and as this technology improves I image it will be more accurate.
     
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  6. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I put my blood sugar readings into the app MySugr. Once you’ve in put sufficient data it will work out an approximate HbA1c for you. My last HbA1c at the Drs was 36, MySugr said 34.4 that day, so it’s not far out. Of course it depends how many readings you put in. I put in between 5-8/day
     
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  7. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Expert

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    Why not just buy an A1c3 test? They are 25 dollars piece but if you buy a ten pack they are about half that
     
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  8. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I'd forgotten about those, there are sometimes deals on them in the UK that members used to post. Are they accurate?
     
  9. Rachox

    Rachox Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I just looked on Amazon UK. The HbA1c meters are £69.99 with two test kits. Further test kits are £120 for 10! :wideyed:
     
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  10. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Expert

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    They are dead accurate. I had an extra test and then after I had given myself one, a doctor took one in his office. it was the exact same looking one and I got an exact same result. Unfortunately, the result did not make me happy

    In the US, Dr. Bernstein of Diabetes Solutions and other books, sells them a little bit more cheaply at his store

    http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/
     
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