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Newly diagnosed, some questions

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Eve_line, Nov 8, 2017.

  1. Eve_line

    Eve_line Type 2 · Member

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    Hi :), so yeah I guess you've heard it so many times before now; newly diagnosed and panicking. I was diagnosed one week ago and am still in lots of distress about how my life is going to change. I wasn't doing well in life before all this, im battling with depression and kind of let everything slide in my life the last 7 years.. i ate way too much, ive no social life, i finished law-study but am not doing anything with my degree, i all suppressed my failure at life by treating myself with food. Food was my friend, the hours after work, laying in my bed eating, is without exegerating the only time i feel a bit of ease about this thing called life. I feel I can not handle this diagnosis because of that. At the same time, I did got back my thirst for knowledge, i googled, i read so much, and then i came on this forum and read more. A voice inside me says; maybe this will be the thing that saves me from an unfullfilling lonely life? I really hope so. I wonder if there are people here who also were so addicted to food and now are on a continious diet (lifestyle change) and are able to be happy?

    Also some more questions:

    * My HBA1C was 50, my cholestrol levels were "fine" (forgot to ask numbers). Online I often read with type 2 you have high cholestrol levels too. Somehow Im worried that i might have type 1. But the doctor easily said; no you're obese so it's type 2. Is it very rare to have normal cholestrol with type 2 ? Or does it happen more?
    * What do you guys think of the plan I made? 8 weeks low calorie shake diet (with carbs below 20) following the Newcastle research, and then LCHF? Is that needed, the 8 weeks? Im day 3 now and im struggling, i keep on thinking; wouldnt it be easier to just do LCHF straight away so at least i can EAT? But then the Newcastle research gives me hope , about the pancreatic fat needing to resolve etc.. although this study seemed so small, and also i noticed the test-person's blood glucose levels were still borderline diabetes if i understand the levels correctly (5,9)
    * Ive been overweight all my life, i ve done so many diets and also the Atkins one and I felt very awful in that diet! I felt dirty and greasy and also continiously hungry while i Always read you should not be hungry on low carbs. I also got heavy headaches and i would generally just not feel right/good. When i eat bread, the thing i crave for so often, i DO feel good and fullfilled and my headache goes away. Im worried this diet wont really make me feel good. I tried Atkins for several weeks so its not that i just gave up easily. Anyone who had that too and now does feel great on low carbs?
    * I am not ready yet to test myself, I will do my best for 3 months and then get tested at the regular way again. What im puzzled at is what is most important? The HBA1C, or the Fasting glucose levels? Or should I also ask for a non-Fasting testing?

    sorry this ended up to be a very long message, thanks for reading. :)
     
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  2. paulus1

    paulus1 · Well-Known Member

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    how old are you.
    * My HBA1C was 50, my cholestrol levels were "fine" (forgot to ask numbers). Online I often read with type 2 you have high cholestrol levels too. Somehow Im worried that i might have type 1. But the doctor easily said; no you're obese so it's type 2. Is it very rare to have normal cholestrol with type 2 ? Or does it happen more? that nearly pre diabetic
    * What do you guys think of the plan I made? 8 weeks low calorie shake diet (with carbs below 20) following the Newcastle research, and then LCHF? Is that needed, the 8 weeks? Im day 3 now and im struggling, i keep on thinking; wouldnt it be easier to just do LCHF straight away so at least i can EAT? But then the Newcastle research gives me hope , about the pancreatic fat needing to resolve etc.. although this study seemed so small, and also i noticed the test-person's blood glucose levels were still borderline diabetes if i understand the levels correctly (5,9) shakes diets never. use this as a wake up diet lose your extra weight and you should be ok. are they sure your type 2 i know your low and dont have the normal symptoms but if your in your 20s it may not be type 2 have they done a gad test.
     
  3. paulus1

    paulus1 · Well-Known Member

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    to be honest dont worry about the type too much the only reason to know is the treatment. a type 2 treatment is not effective on a type 1. im type 1 and the insulin is easy. im on the lchf diet because its great at losing weight. and keeping your bloods stable and low.

    your doctor is guessing and that is not good enough.
     
  4. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome . Your diagnosis could be a turning point in your life. I can't answer all your questions. But here are some observations.
    Your HbA1c level isn't too bad (look at mine). HbA1c is a better test than a finger prick test as it analyses average blood glucose over the previous couple of months, whereas a finger prick test is a one-off test and the result depends largely on what you have eaten just before the test and how your body has reacted.
    You've obviously got a thirst for knowledge so feed that thirst and get motivated in turning what seems to have been a negative outlook on life into a 'can do' project. Set yourself tiny targets to reduce your weight and gain control of your blood glucose. To do the latter you'll need a blood glucose meter and will have to start testing before and after meals. Personally I'd go LCHF and forget about other 'diets', but I've never tried any of them, others will have though.
    Don't aim too high with targets as failure gives negative feedback and nothing encourages progress better than success.
     
  5. Eve_line

    Eve_line Type 2 · Member

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    Thank you for your answer @paulus1 , maybe for now just eating healthy is enough, if the type does not much matter? Ive to say i find it quite a shock already, and i would be upset if it would be type 1. Dont even know if i want to do a gad test (that has something to do with antibodies that type 1 have right?) Good to hear that the insulin is easy for you though! i feel that type 1 is more difficult to live with as type 2.

    yes my doctor is guessing, i find that annoying.. her way of telling me i have diabetes was also very careless and without any empathy, im still upset about that..

    But im not in my twenties, I'm 31 so that might be old enough to be type 2 in combination with being obese.
     
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  6. Eve_line

    Eve_line Type 2 · Member

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    thank you @miahara for your warm and motivating reaction. That is definitly something to consider too, a very low calorie diet could fail and lose motivation. I've to say tonight i ate 3 eggs with avocado as i was too hungry so guess im already failing. :oops: maybe best to make up my mind and go for LCHF.
     
  7. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Eggs and avocado is a great diabetic meal. So you are not failing. You've just made a great start!!!
     
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  8. KathyCP

    KathyCP Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Eve-line, welcome to the forum. All of us here know what it's like to get that diagnosis, so you're definitely not alone! Miahara has given you some great feedback - avocado and eggs are staples for me, they fill me up nicely without doing horrible things to my sugar levels. i would also agree about not trying to lose too much weight too quickly - it sounds like life has been hard for you lately, so don't set targets that are going to be really difficult to meet - personally, i'd also go for a lchf diet, but you need to find out what works for you - so some experimenting might be in order. but i would encourage you to get a meter, as it makes it so much easier to get a good idea of which foods to avoid. the good news is that you can eat fairly large portions of the food that doesn't spike your sugar levels. however, one of the best pieces of advice i was given when i was still struggling to control my levels was to eat enough at a meal so that i didn't feel hungry, but then not to eat or snack for at least 5 hours, so that my body would have a chance to reset itself - but if you are used to using food to make yourself feel better, that may be quite difficult to do, so maybe start by setting much shorter food-free intervals and then gradually increase them. i was also advised to do 5 minutes aerobic exercise soon after waking, in order to get my system going - i am not the world's greatest exercise fanatic, but i found that dancing round my sitting room to music i like does the trick for me..

    i think it's important to remember that this isn't a sprint, it's a marathon. as Miahara pointed out, your ha1bc is actually not too bad (yep,look at what mine was at diagnosis as well), so you can afford to take your time, explore and experiment, and be gentle with yourself as you develop and get used to a different relationship with your body and with food. and this forum is full of people with real knowledge about our condition that they're willing to share, so ask questions to your heart's content! :)
     
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  9. Daibell

    Daibell Type 1.5 · Expert

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    Regardless of your type, I would go for the low-carb diet. Personally I think the ND is oversold. It isn't extensive enough and focusses on calories rather than carbs (why?). As diabetics we are glucose intolerant so reducing the carbs is a logical way forward and isn't based on magical numbers regardless of your weight and build such as 800 (why not 790 or 810 calories?)
     
  10. kokhongw

    kokhongw I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  11. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome.

    I can relate to a lot of your post. Food is a great friend and never lets you down. Until it starts to turn on you and becomes a something that your life revolves around, instead of being just an enjoyable part. When that happened to me I found I could not stop eating, even tho I hated doing it. I would eat in secret in bed, even sneaking food upstairs so the rest of my family didn't see it.

    I wonder if you have ever discussed your relationship with food with anyone? If you feel its worth considering your gp can give you a referral to either a counsellor or appropriate service in a hospital.

    As to diet. I do lchf. I went cold turkey and dropped to 30grms a day at the start. Other people cut down gradually. Its all a matter of personal choice. I did it that way because I know that I find it hard to just have a little. One slice of bread would become half a loaf. So no bread at all. Two chips would become a whole huge portion. So no chips. I had carb flu, but upped salt and drank bovril. It was hard for about a week.

    But I like the way cabs made me feel. Warm and sleepy and sort of safe. I dont have that now. I feel awake and have energy. The opposite of carbs. And that was difficult at first. Tbh if I have a bad day I do long to go back there, but the thought of long term t2d complications and the fact that I can now buy clothes in an ordinary shop keep me lchfing. And I know that I prefer to feel awake for most of the time. I weighed 101kgs in june and I am now 71kgs. My hbalc in June was 53, the last was 39. It can be done.

    One problem, of course, is finding something to replace the time we spent eating. And that can be tough. I have started drawing again. No artist ( my stick men confuse my grandchildren!), but it keeps my hands and mind occupied. I do it in front of the tv, a time I would be mindlessly eating. It sort of fills that gap for me. Those of us who have a very complex and dependant relationship with food need more than just a diet sheet.

    Good luck with it all. There is no doubt it can be done. It is not easy, but you will find loads of help on here. Even if you feel that you have a bad day, or a bad week you can always pick yourself up , and just start again. Keep posting!
     
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  12. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Guru
    Staff Member Retired Moderator

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    @Eve_line

    Hello and welcome to the Forum :) Here is the Basic Information we give to new members and I hope it will be useful to you. Ask questions when you need to and someone will be able to help.


    Basic information for New Members

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you'll find well over 147,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.

    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:
    ・ Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    ・ Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes.

    Over 250,000 people have taken part in the Low Carb Program - an evidence-based, structured education course that is helping people lose weight and reduce medication dependency by explaining the science behind carbs, insulin and GI.

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    ・ Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    ・ 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    ・ Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    ・ 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    ・ Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    ・ 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l

    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:
    ・ structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    ・ self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to blood glucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic.

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.

    Community - what everyone should know:
    ・ Newly diagnosed: what you should know
    ・ Blood glucose test strip access
    ・ Questions to ask at a diabetes clinic
    ・ Forum ethos and rules
    Education - Take part in digital diabetes education programs and improve your understanding of diabetes.
    ・ Low Carb Program - it's made front-page news of the New Scientist and The Times. Developed with 20,000 people with type 2 diabetes; 96% of people who take part recommend it... find out why
    ・ Hypo Program - improve your understanding of hypos. There's a version for people with diabetes, parents/guardians of children with type 1, children with type 1 diabetes, teachers and HCPs.
     
  13. Eve_line

    Eve_line Type 2 · Member

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    @Kentoldlady1 thank you for your reply, and your understanding. I am the same like you, i can better do cold Turkey than a little bit of bread.. it's all or nothing for me.

    i had a very hard day today, laid in bed all day feeling very hopeless and depressed, didnt eat anything. I just went to the supermarket and its nice to be outside but to see all those things in the supermarket knowing i can never eat that again almost made me want to burst out in tears. I did stay strong and only bought some cheese eggs and chicken.

    i didnt tell anyone about my diagnosis except for my sister, and she is already getting tired of me being upset. She is a nurse and believes that it can be healed, and that it doesnt mean you can never eat out or eat bread again.. and when i say that that is not true and it will be for life she says im so negative and she doesnt know what to say anymore and is tired of the discussion. :( hence i really have no one to go to at this point. My parents are very sweet and always supportive but also worry a lot about me, and my mom has cancer (in remission now though thank God) and i dont want to burden them with this..

    So thats why, sorry i m venting here.. i also still worry about the type 1 LADA thing .. :(

    i also feel guilty because i thought with my mental state i had a very hard life .. but i was healthy and never appreciated that enough... maybe this is my punishment.
     
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  14. Eve_line

    Eve_line Type 2 · Member

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    pff in the middle of the night and im now in huge panic, read too much.. now i fear ive pancreatic cancer.

    i had no idea what a diagnosis like diabetes can do to you. All of a sudden i woke up and realize health should not be taken for granted. i Always feared i had diseases but could Always calm myself down saying to myself "dont worry, its only fear".. and now its reality and now i feel what more of my fears are actually reality?
     
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  15. Grateful

    Grateful Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I am really feeling for you. It is hard to change one's relationship to food, and hard to stand up to people (even loved ones) who are giving what may be bad advice. I hope that sharing your concerns here helps a little bit. Many of us have gone through a similar experience. I know it may seem a bit hard to believe right now, but: it does get better over time, for most of us. Take care.
     
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  16. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Eggs are our friend!:):)
     
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