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No link found between type 2 diabetes and thyroid dysfunction, say Iranian scientists

Discussion in 'Diabetes News' started by DCUK NewsBot, Oct 13, 2017.

  1. DCUK NewsBot

    DCUK NewsBot · Well-Known Member

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    Having prediabetes or type 2 diabetes did not increase the risk of thyroid dysfunction, a new Iranian study reveals. Scientists from the University of Medical Sciences in Tehran report that thyroid dysfunction was not significantly associated with glucose metabolism. The findings were taken from the Tehran Thyroid Study where prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was recorded in people with impaired glucose metabolism compared to controls. All participants were aged over 30 years. Incidence of thyroid dysfunction was lower among those with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, but this wasn't significant once adjusted for variables including age, sex, smoking status, blood pressure and BMI. Participants in all three groups who had high baseline levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (TPOAb) were at an increased risk of thyroid disorder over an 11-year follow-up period. "Undetected thyroid disorders may compromise metabolic control of patients with diabetes, [impaired glucose tolerance], or [impaired fasting glucose], and may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease," said the researchers, who added that "diabetes and prediabetes can affect thyroid tests. "Considering the fact that thyroid screening tests are currently recommended only for high-risk groups, i.e. infants, pregnant women and the elderly, conducting these tests in diabetics and prediabetics requires further investigation." The researchers suggest that further studies should be conducted to repeat thyroid tests within 1-4 months of the initial test. "A cohort study with a larger sample size and longer follow-up period is recommended to focus on the assessment of [thyroid dysfunction] in diabetics and prediabetic to gain more insight into this topic," they concluded. The results appear online in the journal PLOS.

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  2. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can understand the headline!!!. So, no link found. So why does it say in the text that there is a link between diabetes and thyroid tests? Does it mean that the diabetes can alter the tests in a way which means that the tsh is not actually lower? The tests just show that it is?
    I think the headline and the bit about further study needed are the only bits I can understand. And all other studies I have seen have all said that there is a link. I would be very pleased if this study is correct, and there is no link. A lot of women, (not the men for some reason) have both of these conditions, plus a couple more. It would be very nice to think that I didnt pass this onto to my children.
     
  3. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Expert

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    I was diagnosed with underactive thyroid first. Although diabetes symptoms were present at 6yrs old (40yrs ago) but my gp hadnt heard of diabetes in children other than type1 with ketoacidosis, then.

    I guess if your thyroid function is broken then it does interfer with metabolism.

    Which came first. The chicken or the egg?
    Insulin resistance or tsh incorrect levels.....?

    My advice..... any signs of thyroid dysfunction then get checked out!!
     
  4. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    To put it simply, I think the article is saying that poor thyroid levels can be associated with poor glucose metabolism but it is the poor thyroid levels that affect the glucose rather than the poor glucose levels that affect the thyroid.
     
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  5. Kentoldlady1

    Kentoldlady1 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I thought thats what it meant, but the headline is a bit misleading. Thanks!
    There was a similar study in india recently which found that if hypothyroidism was treated in new t2ds the bgl were lowered, in some cases requiring no further tx. I think the headline implies no link at all, which is not the case.
     
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