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Question about Dads driving

Discussion in 'Driving and DVLA' started by Lulu9101112, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Not diabeties related but my dads driving can be a bit stupid sometimes like using his mobile when driving (only for texting) and he especially does it when stopped at traffic ques or lights. I've tried telling him to stop it and that's when he just brushes it off. I'm actually suprised he's never been caught by police. (Since it's one of the main problems in our area) I'm just worried one day he will be stopped or cause an accident before someone get's hurt. Just getting caught can cause you too lose your license. It''s bad enough when other drivers do it's worse when one of your parents do it.
    He does also forget his seatbelt sometimes but does do it when I tell him but he doesn't with his mobile. I admit I don't always feel safe in the car with him because of his mobile.
    What can I do even though he doesn't listen?
     
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  2. Juicyj

    Juicyj Type 1 · Moderator
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    Hi @Lulu9101112 - Personally I would ask him to give you his mobile phone or to turn it off whenever you get in the car with him. It's illegal, so 6 points and a £200 fine, remind him of this.

    Sadly I notice so many drivers with their eyes down whilst driving - quite obviously using a phone, it takes seconds to veer across the lines into the path of oncoming cars, i've had to swerve a few myself and it's frightening how quickly you can lose control of a car, the ultimatum is to tell him that you are not prepared to get in the car with him unless he turn's it off or gives it to you - what's more important you or his phone..
     
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  3. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I know even the public buses have had to swerve due to those sort of drivers. According to news articles when ever buses crash or other vehicles it's usually either because of a car driver on there mobile or drunk driver)

    but the thing is how do I know my dad won't do it when I'm not in the car or when he's back home in Netherlands (As he's over here in UK on holiday for a few weeks) (Which makes me even more scared as my half brother is only 3 in Netherlands he's got his whole life ahead of him)

    ps I know it's illegal. 6 points means you lose your lisence because our local police in my area did a crackdown on trying to catch drivers on their mobiles, not wearing seatbelts etc.. a few months ago.
     
  4. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @Lulu9101112 Hes breaking the law, as you know, but more importantly he's risking the lives of other road-users. If it was me, I'd link him to some of the many stories of people using their phone while driving and causing horrific accidents.

    If he continued, I'd report him to the police and hope they caught him. There's a non-emergency number you can call. You might even be able to have a word with your local police station.
     
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  5. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    The law will eventually catch-up with him @Lulu9101112 , to teach him a lesson in the meanwhile just refuse to get in the car with him and ask your mam (or someone else) to drive you around instead.
     
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  6. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I understand this but as I said if he does stop how do I know my dad won't do it when I'm not in the car or when he's back home in Netherlands (As he's over here in UK on holiday for a few weeks) (Which makes me even more scared as my half brother is only 3 in Netherlands he's got his whole life ahead of him)
     
  7. Alison Campbell

    Alison Campbell Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Ultimately you can't control what another adult does. Could you have a word with your half brother's mother or other family in the Netherlands about your concerns?
     
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  8. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Not necessarily Noblehead. In August 2015, a friends husband was out with his cycling club, they had a cycling event coming up. Lee, the cyclist, was hit by a van whilst that van driver was texting. Lee was airlifted to The John Radcliff hospital, but died from his injuries, he left a wife and two daughter's, aged 14 and 12. The van driver had been caught many times and up in front of the magistrates, it was the sixth time for the same offence I believe and yet another magistrate let the van driver off, because.................. a disqualification would affect his job........... so an innocent man lost his life because of this inconsiderate, indifferent and crass individual and the magistrates were to blame as well. I am still outraged and sickened by it all. There is NO excuse.
    @Lulu9101112
     
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  9. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    Try a bit of straight-talking - hard, I know, especially when it's a parent. Tell him honestly what you feel and about your fears. Be prepared for him to say that he can manage it because he's a good driver, etc, but then remind him that all the people using phones when driving thought they were good drivers and in control too.

    Perhaps if he sees how serious and how concerned and afraid you are (and rightly so) he might stop for your sake.

    I think there are apps that can help - almost like a Driving Mode where the phone is silent. Some also send a text alert to tell callers the person is driving and can't answer.

    Speak to him and stress your fears, and give him some practical solutions. Phone in the glovebox on silent, phone off until his destination, phone app to help - lots of options.

    No text is so important that it's worth risking a life for. Tell him that.
     
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  10. Dark Horse

    Dark Horse · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe try showing him this video:-
     
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  11. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Yes very difficult, is there an adult in the family that could have a word with him about his behaviour?

    Very tragic RRB.

    How someone can get away with it 6 times is beyond belief, there needs to be tougher penalties for such driving offences, awful for Lee's family knowing that this man is still free and still driving, the magistrates needs to hang their head in shame.
     
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  12. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Alison Campbell I have no ways of contacting my family in Netherlands.
    @Robinredbreast Sorry to hear about that. Getting away 6 times is ridicolous wouldn't think that would happen he should of lost his licence.
    Some people are idiots. I remember one time waiting by the bus stop near college. There was this Van driver on his mobile he lost control ended up in the bus lane almost blocking the bus coming, (You could hear the bus honking) but somehow an accident wasn't caused because the traffic light turned red (as a student was crossing) so the bus stopped and the van driver managed to get out of the bus lane in time. But it could of been worse it would of definitely caused an accident or hit one of the students if it happend closer to the traffic lights or bus stop or if the light was still green. (The odd thing was it was done in front of a marked police car so the van driver properly got caught afterwards). It shows how distracted people can get.

    @azure and @Dark Horse I'll try but I dunno if that'll work.
     
  13. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I practically said the same things Noblehead, on the lines of, 'I hope the magistrates can sleep at night ' My teen and and one of the daughter's, B, started nursery school together and were friends for years at school, until this happened, now poor B has changed and we have lost contact. A lovely family and the mum, J, is one of the nicest people around.
     
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  14. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Over the winter school holiday period just finished, the Queensland government put in double demerit points for drivers caught using a mobile phone.

    https://www.qld.gov.au/transport/safety/road-safety/mobile-phones/
     
  15. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry but I assume that's US since your using $. So this doesn't make sense as I'm in UK and they changed there rule to 6 points £200 fine and as I said 6 points= lisence taken away.

    Sorry I accidentally missed you out. True but as I said my dads only here for a few weeks and my mum and dad don't get along (there split up)

    (He still does it to use it for sat nav, texting or looking at sport scores like he's only been round here in UK since Sunday and yet I've seen him use his mobile whilst driving 5 times.
    We were originally going to Wales for the trip but I decided not to because I didn't really trust my dad with a 2-3 hour drive because of the mobile thing. It's not only this. I always wear my seatbelt but my dads stopped wearing them. But that's not as important as he finally puts it on because I tell him too or the beeping noise gets too annoying for him.

    Also others I don't see the point reporting it to police because he uses a rental car when in UK so the licence plate changes whenever he comes to UK and also because he doesn't live here.
     
  16. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No I am not in the US, Australia uses the dollar system of 100 cent = $1.00. I would have thought that Queensland would have been a clue.

    I posted because the police and government here are cracking down on dangerous drivers who disregard the traffic rules.

    Any one caught causing a accident while texting whatever, should lose their licence for good in my opinion.
     
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  17. Lulu9101112

    Lulu9101112 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I understand to be honest I think most police in all countries where it's illegal are doing crackdowns. The local police in my area when they did a crackdown. On a video they said it's more common to get accidents caused my mobiles rather than drunk drivers although it's both equally.as bad
     
  18. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I live in North Wales.
    Most of the roads are 60 mph.
    Crashing at that speed is not like crashing at 30 mph.
    Why do people phone and text when driving are they complete idiots or simply addicted to staying in touch?
    We can get by fine as proved by thousands of years without being connected all the time.
    The addicts will ignore what I just said.
    Your father may be putting my l;ife at risk.
    So my dash cam will go to the police if he ends up on it.
    Unfortunately he'll get a fine instead of a ten year ban and possibly jail time.
    Think I'm being over the top?
    Two minute video made in Wales.
    Please watch all of two minutes if you can be dragged away from being connected that long.
    If your attention span can last that long.
    Please watch and then tell me I'm over the top.

     
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  19. azure

    azure Type 1 · Expert

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    @Lulu9101112 It doesn't matter that he doesn't live in the UK. When here, he has to abide by UK laws.

    If you're too scared to travel in the car with him, then that's awful. Please do try to get through the danger to him.

    And ask him to watch the videos above....
     
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  20. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Perhaps your grandparents, brother, sister (on your dad's side) could have a quiet word with him about his dangerous driving habits. Good luck in getting things solved.
     
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