1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Guest, Royal Holloway, University of London are conducting a study to understand how people with diabetes create and share knowledge online. Get involved here »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Shin Splints?

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Goonergal, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,410
    Likes Received:
    3,383
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi

    Anyone got any advice about shin splints? At least I think that's what it is - pain in my right shin when walking.

    I've been stepping up my walking - distance and speed - and noticed some pain a few times so slowed down while walking and that seemed to do the trick but the past couple of days I've really been struggling with it. So don't want to have to stop as I've made such good progress with the walking and have started to really enjoy it.

    All advice appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
    Staff Member

    Messages:
    13,692
    Likes Received:
    27,563
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Are you wearing good shoes? With impact absorbing soles, arch support, and preferably additional inner soles too?

    I had shin splints for AGES in my teenage years. I think they were caused by a particular pair of school shoes that I pounded to and from school in (nearly 2 miles each way). They took ages to recover, largely (I think) because they never healed properly in the school holidays, and then I made them worse again every term.

    Of course, that is decades ago, and there may be some wonder cure/treatment now available - in which case, I will be very interested :)

    I did google this:
    http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/shin-splints/Pages/Introduction.aspx
     
  3. GrantGam

    GrantGam Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,634
    Likes Received:
    1,561
    Trophy Points:
    178
    Shin splints are horrible.

    I got them pretty bad after a month of running on the open deck of an oil tanker after my shifts. I put them down to the hard surface as the symptoms quickly subsided when I started to use the treadmill instead.

    @Brunneria is right about the good footwear as well. It's so important that regular runners can change their trainers 3-4 times per year.

    If you've not got decent shoes then that would be a good place to start, along with changing your route to one comprises of mainly soft surfaces such as woodland paths and/or grass.
     
  4. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,410
    Likes Received:
    3,383
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Hi @Brunneria and @GrantGam thanks for replying.

    I am wearing good shoes - Skechers Go Walk - so don't think it's that. I can look at the routes, but have built up by integrating walking into my routine to give me a chance of keeping it up so have been adding distance to the routes to and from work, walking in the lunch hour and sometimes after dinner. All in very urban Inner London!

    Am guessing I've done too much too soon as I was previously very sedentary. May have to take a trip to the docs.
     
    • Hug Hug x 1
  5. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    Likes Received:
    480
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Try swimming a few times a week, so you have a few fewer days walking.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Useful Useful x 1
  6. helensaramay

    helensaramay Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,072
    Likes Received:
    774
    Trophy Points:
    153
    Looking at reviews of the Skechers Go Walk, it looks as there are some limitations such as lack of arch support and that the soles wear down quickly.
    Despite their price, not everyone agrees they are good for regular walking: trainers may be better.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Hotpepper20000

    Hotpepper20000 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    717
    Likes Received:
    504
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I find that Sketchers are good because the bed it soft and absorbs impact.
    But they don't have enough support for my arches and ankles. For me,once I got shoes that came up higher on my feet and that I could tie up tight, it helped.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,410
    Likes Received:
    3,383
    Trophy Points:
    158
  9. MangosteenElbow

    MangosteenElbow Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    43
    If you get shin splints from only walking then you have some significant biomechanical issues. You need to address that before finding shoes to suit you.
    Without knowing how shoes could affect the forces on your bones during walking you are just as likely to make it worse, and even more so during running.
    Ideally you would find a biomechanical expert who analyses your walking (probably on a treadmill). Maybe a podiatrist with exercise and physiology credentials. Most good running coaches have an eye for the obvious, which could be a start.
    The excess loads which contribute to pain in your shins could come from a number of possible causes. Turned in hips; torsional twist in lower limbs ... We're guessing until there is accurate analysis of your particular gait.
    Shoes with excess cushioning, heel flare, little flex in the midsole, big heel toe drop ... can contibute to distorted biomechanics. Avoid buying them based on reviews alone. Buy them to suit your needs so you have to work out your beeds not guess them or ignore it them.
    That step will save you $$$$ in the "long run" and support your development into higher load bearing running.



    Sent from my SM-G900I using Diabetes.co.uk Forum mobile app
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 2
  10. Sean01

    Sean01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    340
    Likes Received:
    1,034
    Trophy Points:
    158
    My wife studied shin splints for her dissertation for her sports massage qualification. It was a good choice as I suffered massively with this.

    Arnica cream - dealt with swelling (non prescription)
    Massage but gentle at first otherwise you can make it worse.
    Good footwear - always. I don't even go barefoot around the pool on holiday - I have orthotic supports. I feel pain after 10 steps without them.
    Good support/shock absorbtion in the shoes.
    Walking - I've walked the Loch Ness Marathon - I came last but I did it. The training was intense. The warm up is CRUCIAL. I purposely walk very slowly for the first 20-30 minutes (window shopping speed) before picking up the pace.

    Ice will also work - to alleviate the swelling.

    I lived with this for years - but it can be dealt with. It takes time and patience and a lot of massage and stretching.

    Good luck.
    Sean
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. woodenone46

    woodenone46 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    As others have said A good pair of shoes. I would suggest that you go to a Sports store that have a gait analysis machine & they will be able to advise the best shoes for you.
    I suffered from shin sprints after I started running Got this test done & A decent pair of trainers & have not suffered since. Remember that it is recommended that you replace your shoes after aprox 3 to 500 miles.
    Shin splints are often brought about by not landing the foot correctly & having the correct footwear will certainly help to alleviate the problem
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. woodenone46

    woodenone46 Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    14
    Trophy Points:
    3
    As others have said A good pair of shoes. I would suggest that you go to a Sports store that have a gait analysis machine & they will be able to advise the best shoes for you.
    I suffered from shin sprints after I started running Got this test done & A decent pair of trainers & have not suffered since. Remember that it is recommended that you replace your shoes after aprox 3 to 500 miles.
    Shin splints are often brought about by not landing the foot correctly & having the correct footwear will certainly help to alleviate the problem
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. Goonergal

    Goonergal Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,410
    Likes Received:
    3,383
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Thanks @MangosteenElbow @Sean01 and @woodenone46

    I am slowly getting there and will finally have a podiatry appointment the week after next (long wait at my surgery). I have been to the London Met Uni sports injury clinic in the meantime - very reasonable cost!
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook