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Slow running - effect on blood sugar

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Snapsy, Nov 4, 2017.

  1. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi folks, thought I'd just report on my parkrun experience this morning. Before I started getting injured every time I ran, my PB at parkrun was 29:00, but once I had my eureka moment a few weeks ago to just run slower (last week 36:57, this week 34:53 - slow, steady, not too out of breath, didn't stop) I have been a very, very much happier runner - and my legs don't hurt. Hurrah!

    I thought I'd share with you what I've noticed since running slower. Typically - at parkrun and at running club twice a week - I run 5km - and where this used to take me 30 minutes (at running club, where we run around town and in local parks), I'm taking more like 40 minutes.

    The effect on my blood sugar is a downward direction with no peak at the onset. When I used to run faster, I'd get a massive initial peak, then a big drop. I'd turn my pump basal down to 50%, sometimes 20%. I'd then climb and climb after I'd finished running - partly due to the drop in basal while running, and partly due to that whole post-exercise adrenaline thing.

    Today was massively different. I started my run at 6.3, having had my normal breakfast (2 eggs) and normal breakfast bolus. I turned my pump down to 20%, then 10%, then off completely after about 10 minutes of my slow and steady running.

    And I didn't peak! It was a steady drop. I got to the finish with a sugar of 4.2, had my barcode scanned, had a glucose tablet, kept the pump at 0% basal, and headed off for another 3.5km loop (I'm trying to build up my distances as I've got a 10k in a couple of weeks), having two more glucose tablets en route. I was dipping a little low towards the end, but when I got back to my car I was 5.4, as the glucose had caught up with me (thankfully).

    I'm afraid I'm only showing you half of the equation, as I've got no actual data to show you or tell you about for all my previous runs where I've gone hell for leather, creating massive peaks at the outset. But this is this morning's Libre graph:

    libre0411.JPG

    The time on my reader display runs annoyingly slow - that little dip followed by a slight rise just before 9am actually relates to just after 9am, once the run had started.

    I learned on the Animas Sports Weekend I did last year that endurance exercise generally does cause me to drop, but rapid sprinty aerobic exercise gives me an immediate peak. It turns out from this morning's experience that my speed alone, it seems, really does also make a difference to my blood glucose.

    :)
     
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  2. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @Snapsy . Looks like you've goy some really useful information here. You should be able to use it to make running and BS control easier.
    What is really impressive though is you are back running and pain free. I'm happy for you. You must be well chuffed.:)
     
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  3. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for saying this, @therower ! Chuffed I definitely am!

    It's ironic that ever since I started running last year I had thought that 'to run' meant 'to go as fast as you can'! I've only just woken up to the fact that I could have been running slower and more enjoyably and without so much disappointment and pain and osteopathy, rather than just throwing myself into it without a thought for the gruelling and sometimes agonising consequences!

    But I'm actually feeling really positive now about the injuries and the training hiatuses - because I needed to go through that to realise that I find running to be fabulous fun and excellent exercise for the mind and not just the body! Running improves my mood no end.

    No 5-hours-post-exercise sudden drop to be had on my Libre graph today. No clue what miracle has occurred! Wonder if my bangers and cauliflower cheese will put paid to the straight line?! :rolleyes:

    image.jpeg
     
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  4. therower

    therower Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    @Snapsy . Since first meeting you on the forum it was quite obvious that you're not the type of person to do anything by halves.
    It is very easy to always try to go full out at every exercise session.
    I did this time last week,it stands to reason i should go a little quicker this week. It actually doesn't work like that.:banghead:
    I'm fast approaching mid 50's, and I can still push heavy weights in the gym. Problem is my joints ache continually. I've changed what I do, lighter weight but a lot more reps, currently it's working great, enjoyable, intense workouts AND no aching joints.
    I have to be honest and accept that age is probably the main reason for having to change, sometimes you have to let pride and past achievements take a back seat and listen to what your body is actually telling you.
    Good luck with the forthcoming 10k.

    P.S. I wasn't implying that you should follow my lead now I'm 50+. As a far younger lady, you will not have to consider changing anything for a good while yet:):):)
     
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  5. Snapsy

    Snapsy Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My birthday next week will plant me firmly in my mid 40s, @therower ! But thank you!
    :happy:
     
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