1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

So confused....apologies for long first post

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Nanny_B, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. Nanny_B

    Nanny_B Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Hi everyone, I was diagnosed on Friday with Type 2. I was stunned but also relieved as it explained why I had been feeling so poorly for such a long time. I discovered today my readings on Friday were 14 for my blood glucose and 97HbA1c!
    Dr said I'd had this for a long time, not sure how long but my last glucose test was done in 2010 when it was ok.

    I've been put on 3 lots of tablets, one is for my cholestorol and then Metmorfin and Glyclazide.
    My nurse today issued me with a blood testing kit with all the little needles and test strips and said they will top up my prescriptions free of charge so very lucky in that area. I'm going on a course for four half days at my local hospital also. Then my Diabetic Nurse will call me once a week.

    So now I'm feeling overwhelmed with all the new info and am trying to work out what I can and cant eat. Id started a diet 2 weeks ago, low carb and eating much healthier and so now I know this news I'm determined to keep going. I have three stone to lose so just as well.

    What confuses me though is I've been reading so much on this site over the weekend about having cream in coffee and full fat butter etc....how can I lose weight if I'm eating foods high in fat? I really am at a loss as to what I should be eating to bring my levels down and lose the weight. Is it mainly low sugar content and low carbs I need to be aiming for? And is there is guideline I should be looking at when checking food labels as to what the recommended amount is for carbs, fat, sugar content?

    Sorry for the long post, so much I want to ask really but I know I will have invaluable help on here from you all in the coming weeks. Many thanks for reading.
     
    • Hug Hug x 7
    • Like Like x 2
  2. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,225
    Likes Received:
    9,251
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Welcome to the forum.

    Here's a great web site that explains type 2 diabetes in an easy to understand, straightforward manner:

    www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/

    In regards to fat, the simple answer is that dietary fat doesn't make people fat, carbs do. The other thing to consider is that carbs (sugar, potatoes, wheat, etc) raise blood glucose levels. Fats do not. So eating more fat and less carbs will bring your blood glucose levels down.

    Here's a great site on how to eat a low carb diet:

    www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb

    Personally, I recommend that you (and everyone) eat as little factory processed food as possible (i.e. packaged food with labels). Eat fresh food that's been minimally processed.
     
    • Agree Agree x 7
    • Like Like x 4
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  3. KezG

    KezG Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    540
    Trophy Points:
    133
    @Nanny_B Hello and welcome to the forum.. I had the same feelings as you are having now.. there's so much information to absorb in the first few weeks.. it gets easier. This forum is a great place to start.. just ask.. if you need answers.. there's plenty of experienced people here to help.
     
    • Like Like x 4
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 · Oracle

    Messages:
    16,660
    Likes Received:
    25,747
    Trophy Points:
    278
    Hi and welcome,

    It is very confusing at first. We have all been there. It is also a shame that body fat and dietary fat have the same name - this is very confusing. What makes most of us fat are the carbs, or a combination of high carbs and high fat. When we seriously reduce the carbs and increase our dietary fat, most of us lose weight. The more we reduce our carbs the more fat we need to eat in order to retain enough energy. Low carb and low fat is likely to produce fatigue. You don't have to go mad on dietary fats if you don't want to, just ditch any low fat products you eat and buy the real thing. Then use good fats to fill you up.

    This is a useful thread

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/a-new-low-carb-guide-for-beginners.68695/

    and there is a low carb diet/weight loss plan on this website

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/lowcarb/?utm_source=hp&utm_medium=dd&utm_campaign=lcp
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. Jamesuk9

    Jamesuk9 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    503
    Likes Received:
    427
    Trophy Points:
    83
    In simple terms, ignore all the western dietary advice from the last 40 yrs and buy only full fat dairy produce. Use full fat butter and cream and eat plenty of healthy dietary fat, eat eggs, as many as you like and plenty of meat and fish. Bacon and egg is a perfect breakfast for diabetics. Snack on nuts instead of cakes and biscuits and turn away from grains and cereals and processed foods. If you must eat fruit, stick to berries and eat plenty of above ground veg. All below ground veg is starchy and turns to sugar in your stomach. If you use your meter before and after every meal at 1 and 2 hours you will soon work out what foods spike your BS levels and need to be Eliminated or reduced. If you follow the sound advice on the forum your glucose levels will start to fall within days. there is plenty of support here at any time if you need it.
     
    • Like Like x 7
  6. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    109
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Don't be disheartened. Follow the advice from people here and there is a good chance that you can get your blood sugar back well towards, or into the normal range. When first diagnosed my HbA1c was higher than yours (107 mmol/mol) and it is now in the normal range at 34 mmol/mol.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    388
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi @Nanny_B ! Welcome. First I have to say you seem to be getting some good support from your health service and far better than I received at first or since, and I suspect many others here will not have had as good support as you are receiving.
    You've probably been provided with the self-testing supplies because of the gliclazide you've been prescibed as it's a sulphonylurea drug and can lower BG sufficiently low enough to cause hypoglycaemia which is something to be avoided (I'm on it but have only had one 'hypo' and I know exactly what caused it so am unlikely to have another!)
    Like Jay-Marc above, my initial HbA1c was well above yours, but the meds and probably more importantly diet have reduced it considerably and I'm currently approximately 47.7.
    As had already been said it's the carbs in foods you need to watch - read the backs of food packaging and forget the sugars on the 'traffic lights'. Cream is very low carb, about 2.2/100g and double cream even lower at 1.7/100g. Spreadable light butter comes in at a mere 0.8/100g.
    On the basis that 'A picture's worth a thousand words', the graph shows what happened to my BG levels when I went from 'lowish carbs' to 'next to no carbs' in October this year.
    Hang on in here, you'll learn a lot and get all the support you want.

    Dave
    upload_2017-1-23_19-20-25.png
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Winner Winner x 3
  8. Energize

    Energize Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    271
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Hi @Nanny_B

    Yes, welcome to the forum, the right place to be for good advice. There is so much knowlege and expertise here which, fortunately, is happily shared.

    Yes, you must be very confused and that is quite normal, under the circumstances. Take each day at a time, ask questions here, read lots, and try not to get overwhelmed or stressed. There's life after such a diagnosis :)

    Now, the good news is that, yes, you CAN enjoy a lot of previously 'forbidden' foods. Eventually, when you have had a chance to do lots or reading, you will have a better understanding of this but, in the meantime, take the advice from NHS professionals (ie doctors, nurses etc) about the EatWell Plate. For several reasons, although this is pushed as 'healthly', the amount of carbs are not healthly/best for diabetics. Carbs, which includes sugars, grains, fruit, bread, pasta, rice, are sources of glucose once in your body system so, to minimise your glucose levels, it's useful to restrict some, or all, of these foods. I'll tag @daisy1 for you, who will post some very useful information re Diabetes. It's a good base to start from.

    So, carbs are well worth much consideration. Also, an increase in fats is actually good and will often improve cholestrol levels, believe it or not ;) I'm not on statins as I didn't tolerate them well so happy to ditch them but, since LCHF, my cholestrol has significantly improved.

    There are some lovely foods that you can eat when LCHF and, because of the fats, one tends not to be hungry. It's also a brilliant way for weight los - I'm lost 3 st and haven't managed to do anything like this before, in spite of WW or SW - just can't cope with watching food etc but this way is great :) However, your nurse is best left in ignorance, to be honest, as they seem to think you need carbs for the brain!!! You will get plenty glucose for your brain and energy on LCHF

    Also, try to leave low fat foods on the shelf, and choose full fat. The low fat variety will usually have extra sugar in!!!

    Test, test and test. Find out what foods you can tolerate etc. Luckily, you have already been prescribed meter and strips - well done :)

    Good luch and keep posting :)
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  9. jonbvn

    jonbvn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    553
    Likes Received:
    1,357
    Trophy Points:
    138
    Hi Nanny_B and welcome to this forum. You have made the 1st and most vital step in getting your condition under control.

    Similar to you, I was very sceptical regarding LCHF given that it is so contrary to conventional dietary advice. However, after 4 months, a 33kg weight loss, a 50% reduction in HBA1C and several improvements in cardiological health my scepticism has been dispelled.
     
    • Like Like x 5
    • Winner Winner x 2
  10. Nanny_B

    Nanny_B Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Hi all, thank you so much for all your amazing and informative replies. I'm so grateful to you for taking the time to help me. I tried to take a blood glucose test tonight but made a Royal mess trying to get the drop of blood onto the testing strip so will attempt tomorrow lol.
    I'm feeling much more positive now and look forward to getting my numbers back to a better level.
    Many thanks again guys x
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  11. Nanny_B

    Nanny_B Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    18
    WOW!! That's amazing!
     
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  12. miahara

    miahara Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    432
    Likes Received:
    388
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Don't sweat about finger pricking, it too me a couple of weeks to get it right and was was getting a bit fed up and sore having three stabs at it! Soaking your hands in a basin of hot water water increases the blood supply to the fingers and makes drawing a little drop of blood easier. Make sure you dry your hands completely before testing.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Useful Useful x 1
  13. Jay-Marc

    Jay-Marc Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    109
    Trophy Points:
    83
    You may well be doing it right, but in case you aren't, you don't put the blood directly onto the test strip but place it very close by so it 'sucks' it up under capillary action. Think it took me a few before I got the hang of this as instructions aren't always clear.
     
    • Useful Useful x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
  14. Japes

    Japes Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    427
    Likes Received:
    1,273
    Trophy Points:
    158
    LCHF sounded incredibly counter-intuitive to me, and I resisted going that way for a while. I was 18 and a half stone, tried desperately on several occasions to lose weight well before my diagnosis with the High Carb Low Fat advice and loads of fruit and veg, but to no avail, and gave up. After all, I was, as 1 GP so charmingly put it, "ridiculously healthy considering your weight." Completely switching that food advice round and allowing myself eggs, butter, cream, full fat whatever and good oils, was just totally weird.

    But, the results speak for themselves. I've almost completely lost the weight I needed to - down to the last stubborn few pounds, and I really can't remember when I was last in the 9 stone something for weight - around 14 or so, probably and I'm in my 50s now.

    On the whole, on LCHF, my blood glucose levels are excellent and, according to my spreadsheet, the bad weeks are only when I've risked cake or cookies or chips. It seems to take days to get the elevated results back down again. Other bad spells have been illness or stress related. Good incentive to avoid both where possible.

    However, with 30g - 45g of carbs a day. mostly from vegetables, a few berries and the occasional piece of very dark chocolate, a lot of walking, and good portion control, I'm fine. In fact, I've never been healthier or had more energy.
     
    • Like Like x 6
    • Winner Winner x 4
    • Agree Agree x 1
  15. Clivethedrive

    Clivethedrive Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,990
    Likes Received:
    22,729
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Nicely summed up
     
    • Agree Agree x 6
    • Winner Winner x 1
  16. SWUSA_

    SWUSA_ Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,043
    Likes Received:
    1,280
    Trophy Points:
    158
    Welcome and I will tag @daisy1 for you with a little more helpful advice and a post that contains the blood glucose ranges we are aiming for when we test.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  17. callyandy

    callyandy Type 2 · Expert

    Messages:
    5,222
    Likes Received:
    12,798
    Trophy Points:
    198
    Welcome to the best place to be if you have been diagnosed with diabetes. Lots of clever, generous peeps have helped me over the last 4 months. Good luck on your journey.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  18. Contralto

    Contralto Other · Expert

    Messages:
    5,026
    Likes Received:
    5,332
    Trophy Points:
    198
    I, too, had a real hard time trying to learn how to use my meter. The endocrinologist gave me a very large sample lancing device and moreover, didn't tell me to cock it. I literally opened the thing and stabbed myself with it to provide a blood sample for over a year until I was fortunate to actually see another diabetic sample their blood in public.

    I paid 52 dollars to a nurse from the self same practice to show me how to use the meter but they just lanced me with a separate giant lance and showed me how to apply my blood to the meter, once and were dismissive about a second try see. I wasted about ten expensive strips before I got the meter to work at home. I was diabetic for five years before I discovered, from a pharmacist being kind enough to tell me, that the physician should have given me a prescription for the meter, the strips, the lancing device lancets and the alcohol pads sufficient for testing 5-8 times a day. I paid a 20 dollar copay to make an unnecessary visit to get the new Rx.

    So, having revealed my inane essential stupidity to the Forum, I would suggest that there is no question stupid enough not to post. You will notice that some of the pain I went through had much to do with not knowing WHAT to ask about, and living badly on what little advice and choices I was given.

    So, sounds like you were given a good start. In addition to supplies and a gentle lancing device, here are a few idiot simple things it took me years to find out:

    1. Take your idabetes meds halfway through a meal and never take metformin on an empty stomach
    2. Space out your meds
    3. Whenever possible, but especially for metformin, get time release versions of meds
    4. Artificially colored meds are unacceptable. Ask for kinder generics
    5. Test in public because people have to know visually how diabetes works, what is normal testing (waking, right before meals, 1 and 2 hours after meals, right before bedtime
    6. There is a difference between fats on a steak or in fatty bacon and really great fats like coconut oil, olive oil and etc. However, cream is your good friend and if it says low fat on the label and you can have high fat, choose the high fat.

    The best testing devices take the smallest sample of blood, come with an electronic link so you can keep records that can be loaded into Microsoft's free Health vault or somewhere else.

    While involved in this life learning experiment and experience, test your blood pressures and be aware of all of the things that can happen with metabolic syndrome if you are Type 2.

    Make sure you are type 2 and not some other form of diabetes

    eat the world and eat the rainbow while you are skipping carbs. Have the occasional root veggie as well. Enjoy life, listen to music, watch extraordinary things in nature and on film, talk your head off and choose the forum to vent
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 2
    #18 Contralto, Jan 23, 2017 at 10:10 PM
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2017
  19. Phoenix55

    Phoenix55 Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    251
    Likes Received:
    263
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Welcome @Nanny_B You will soon get the hang of testing, you are lucky to have been given the kit, most of us have to buy our own. LCHF does seem strange at the beginning but as the weight slowly and steadily rolls off, the numbers drop, and people comment on how good you look you know you have got it right. I lost about a pound a week which sounds very slow but it worked, was steady and gave me time to develop new eating habits which have lasted. Do keep a food diary so that you know which foods raise your bg, the only way to really take control is to test 2 hours after every meal and if you have space keep a note of exercise taken and your mood. Read round the forum and ask questions, we are a friendly bunch who try to help each other and share the joy of success while supporting when things don't work out. Think of it as starting a new chapter in an adventure to find out something new about yourself. No turning back, no regrets, there will be hard times but there will also be success. Remember you are not alone but you are unique. Good luck.
     
    • Like Like x 3
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Friendly Friendly x 1
  20. Nanny_B

    Nanny_B Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    40
    Likes Received:
    31
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Once again I can't thank you all enough to take time out to help and advice. Am taking it all on board and will be on here asking lots more no doubt until I get well into my stride!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 2
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook