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Spikes after Sport

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by Sawds, Oct 12, 2017 at 8:57 PM.

  1. Sawds

    Sawds Type 2 · Member

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    I was diagnosed type 2 about 4 weeks ago and have managed to consistently got my levels down to between 4.5 and 6.5 since then by cutting out a lot of carbs from my diet.

    I am 34, not overweight and have always been active and fairly sporty but my diet I have to admit has probably let me down. Although not anymore as the perk of this condition is it has made me far more healthy than when it comes to food than I have ever been.

    I am a little concerned though as hockey season has started again and as something that I have done for over 20 years I do not want to stop. My issue is that after I have played my levels spike (15.6 and 10.4 straight after playing), is this normal? I know that Adrenalin can affect levels and I am pretty competitive!! I do find that my levels drop to normal within and hour but the problem then is that they continue to drop to hypo range! Before diagnosis I think I had this problem as quite often an hour and a half after playing I would have what I know now is hypo symptoms which I would treat by binging on sweet treats until I felt normal. I have a sandwich now and in a way pre-diagnosis experience has actually helped my with hypos but my question is has anyone else had the same issue after high intensity exercise? I do not plan to give it up but wondered whether there is any way of reducing the spikes or preventing the hypos?
     
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  2. Sean01

    Sean01 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello @Sawds
    I occasionally have a similar problem with sugar spikes after a weightlifting work out. (strong man training - in the short and old category) I test before and right after each session as well as other times of the day.

    More often than not, I will see no difference in readings. This is what I am aiming for. I get super excited when I go to the gym. my resting bpm is around 55-60. On entering the gym, it immediately shoots to 90 plus - anticipation - I know what's coming next and my body is preparing for the flight/fight. Adrenalin levels up, breathing rate increased etc etc.
    There will be a sugar output from the liver - as part of the exercise process, glycogen stored in the liver will be released as glucose to feed the muscles, so I would expect my blood sugars to go up. The trick is to be able to utilse all of the sugar released so that when the work out is finished, the 'spare glucose' has been used up.

    This takes a lot of practice, fine tuning diet and possibly, more importantly, having a good handle on how much energy is being used - something that's easy to do with sets, reps and weights, but probably impossibly to do in a participation sport like hockey - how much running, sprinting/jogging etc will you do in a match?

    If I train to exhaustion, I am by definition, using up the glucose in my blood to a sufficient level.

    Sometimes I over do it - especially on leg day (deadlifts, leg curls, squats, leg press (up to 1,000 lbs on a good day) followed by calf raises, and then either Farmers Walks or Prowlers. My plan is to take it to the very edge. I know I've done well when I have trouble concentrating and can just about make it home! On those occasions the blood sugar drop might be in excess of 1.5 (drop, not actual level)

    Sometimes, I ignite the fuse, get the glycogen released but don't use it up as much as I should. Then I will see an increase. Nothing too horrifying, but I have to go home and eat. I would prefer not to do that on top of a sugar spike.

    Practice is the key, but practicality in a hockey match might be illusive, but eating management may help (not just what you eat but when you eat.

    One last point, I use metformin time release - I believe that this helps a lot. It may be worth having a chat with your nurse. I know what works but I am not a health professional. I pick heavy things up, move them a bit and put them down again. I'm not a doctor.

    I hope this helps.

    Sean
     
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  3. Sawds

    Sawds Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks Sean, food management might be key but it is very complicated. Pre-diagnosis I used to get hypo’s after playing but back then I didn’t know what they were, I didn’t use to eat before playing back then as would sometimes feel a bit full which isn’t ideal before a game. I’m pretty competitive so like to think I make a huge effort when playing. I have started eating better before playing and this does seem to have seen the drop from the 15.6 the first week to the 10.2 last. What is strange is that I played summer League before diagnosis which meant evening games and with this I used to eat after games and not have a problem with the hypos! I guess it’s a case of getting used to it and seeing what works although what that is might take a while to work out as it’s confused my doctor!!
     
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