1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2017 »
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

Started running again -sugars going high!

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by drahawkins_1973, Mar 22, 2017.

  1. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Hi all. I've just started running and I'm finding I get a really sharp rise in my sugars when I stop. I'm only doing 2 miles and my sugars are fine during the jog but the minute I stop my sugars shoot up (from about 6 to 11 in about 5 minutes!).
    How can I manage this? Any thoughts. I currently just take a shot of novarapid as soon as I get in the door and my sugars come back down within an hour but I'm worried this spike isn't good. I was wondering if I should eat something and bolus for this before I start but it makes me a bit nervous as I don't want to go low when I'm out.
    It's giving me the perfect excuse not to carry on and I have given up a few times previously due to this but I really want to stick with it this time.
    Any advice welcome!
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Winner Winner x 1
  2. Freema

    Freema Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,961
    Likes Received:
    4,178
    Trophy Points:
    158
    dont give up, maybe take a whisky right after to block the liver .... only 1 ;):)
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Funny Funny x 1
  3. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Whisky! Is that tried and tested or just a nice excuse
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Funny Funny x 1
  4. walnut_face

    walnut_face Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,504
    Likes Received:
    4,532
    Trophy Points:
    178
    @drahawkins_1973 I have the same problem, but I am type 2. I either a) put up with it or b) warm down by walking for ½ hour
     
    • Like Like x 1
  5. TorqPenderloin

    TorqPenderloin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,588
    Likes Received:
    2,203
    Trophy Points:
    178
    I have the same issue if I take a break from exercising for more than 3-4 days. Fortunately, the problem goes away within 2-3 days after I start working out again.

    I find that there's a strong correlation between glycogen storage and hyperglycemia after exercise. If I'm eating lot of carbs and not exercising my muscles are able to replenish their glycogen storage over that 3-4 day break. After I start running again for 2-3 days my glycogen storage becomes depleted.

    What does that mean in layman's terms? When I eat lots and don't exercise, the glucose in my blood has nowhere to go so it either gets stored as fat or my blood sugar rises. When I regulate my eating and exercise frequently, that glucose can get stored (as glycogen) in my muscles which acts almost as a buffer for my blood sugar levels.

    If you're running 2 miles/day, try to be consistent about running for 4-5 days in a row and keep an eye on how many carbs you eat. I wouldn't be surprised if the problem goes away after that.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  6. Kristin251

    Kristin251 LADA · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,929
    Likes Received:
    2,184
    Trophy Points:
    158
    LOL. I You!!!!
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  7. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Thanks, I think 4-5 days in a row might be a bit ambitious at the moment but it makes sense what you've said so I will keep it up and see how I go!
    Edited to add- Thinking about it a bit more I eat pretty low carb, would this still apply?
     
    #7 drahawkins_1973, Mar 22, 2017 at 8:58 PM
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017
  8. Teammidwife

    Teammidwife Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    61
    Trophy Points:
    38
    I have just joined a beginners running club,, I am type 2 but hba1 is much improved, so metformin down to 500mg. I don't eat before a run, but my BG is higher after the run than at any other time! Am worried that if the metformin is stopped I won't be able to keep my levels down @drahawkins_1973 , @walnut_face
     
  9. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Hi Teammidwife. I haven't found a way to stop this rise. As type 1 as I can take some quick acting insulin when I've finished which does bring my levels back down within an hour or so, but I wouldn't know what to recommend for you...sorry
     
  10. Sarebear86

    Sarebear86 Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    63
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. notoriousnick

    notoriousnick Type 1 · Member

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    43
    A bit late to this thread, but ... I run up to 120km a week. My BGLs will rise quickly after a run. However, a few hours later, BGLs will start dropping as muscles start sucking glucose out of the blood stream to replenish glycogen stores.

    The initial rise is probably from counter-regulatory hormones (adrenaline, cortisol, etc.) generated during the run. I treat this with insulin in a pre-emptive way. That is, I don't wait for BGLs to go up, I just give a few units shortly after the run is finished and monitor BGLs closely. Once the fast acting insulin has worn off, I keep an eye out for dropping BGLs, as this is when the counter-regulatory effect has also worn off and BGLs may start to drop. The length of time this happens may depend on how far and hard you ran, your fitness and physiological factors specific to you.

    Stick with it - eventually you get things right by trial and error! :)

    Just my two cents.

    T1D since 1972.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  12. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    1,633
    Trophy Points:
    178
    What time of day are you running ? I need to bolus for pre breakfast morning runs, this keeps me relatively flat throughout and after.
     
  13. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Thanks both for your replies.

    I currently run in the evening about 6pm, but I don't see a difference if I run earlier on the weekends.
    I am currently taking some quick acting as soon as I get in the door form the run but I still spikes up to about 11 or 12. they do come back done afterwards but I'm a bit worried having spikes that high even for short amount of time.

    I was wondering whether I should try and eat a small snack before and bolus for it and hope that having some insulin on board would help....?? I'd be a bit nervous about bolusing with no food but @Wurst do you find that's ok., no lows?

    I'm only doing 3 miles at the moment, and would like to build on this but want to figure out how to manage the highs first.
     
  14. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    730
    Likes Received:
    352
    Trophy Points:
    103
    Lots more information about exercise with type 1 diabetes on Runsweet website. One technique that might help is ending each run with a sprint - a burst lessens blood glucose rise.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  15. Wurst

    Wurst Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,001
    Likes Received:
    1,633
    Trophy Points:
    178
    HI Drahawkins_1973,
    This only works for me in the morning i.e. when dawn phenomenon is in play. If I ran in the evening (which is very rare) I would typically see a BS drop and would not need to bolus before. This is the same for cycling. A few weeks ago I ended up going for a longish ride > 70 km in the afternoon versus the morning and ended up hypoing, not very pleasant.

    How intensely are you running the 3 miles, a really hard run for me (i.e sprint training) can result in spikes even with some bolus onboard.
     
  16. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Not very :)
    I've only recently upped to 3 mile from 2 so I'm still only going at about 10 minute miles.

    I think I might try a snack an pre-bolus this evening and see how that works...
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  17. drahawkins_1973

    drahawkins_1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    543
    Trophy Points:
    133
    Couldn't be bothered going our yesterday as it was too wet. I have however been reading on here about Fiasp as a very rapid insulin. People have reported its very good for correction doses and it does indeed kick in much quicker than novorapid. I think I could prob live with a very short duration spike and so I'll see if I can get my GP to prescribe it for me.
     
  18. Lorraine1973

    Lorraine1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    412
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Going for a walk later and I would like to know if I should lower my basal by 20% and should I do this as I've never done it before. I'm interested what results will show at the end of the walk x
     
  19. Lorraine1973

    Lorraine1973 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    412
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Think I may have put this in the wrong thread. Sorry x
     
    • Like Like x 1
  20. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    9
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Try walking for the last 10 minutes, I expect that the body has decided you need a lot of BG for running, but the body can't instantly turn of the production of BG.
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook