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Statins & high cholesterol

Discussion in 'Newly Diagnosed' started by Rutho, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. Chowie

    Chowie Type 1 · Active Member

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  2. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  3. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It'll be different again next week.
     
  4. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Whereas statins were certainly designed to lower serum cholesterol (as I recall) by enhancing its breakdown in the body, the fact is they don't really know how it reduces the incidence of cardiovascular events. They know people with high cholesterol tend to have more cardiovascular events and statins reduce that, but they also reduce it in people who have cardiovascular disease but "normal" cholesterol levels. FYI the first statin released by our FDA was lovastatin (Mevacor) in 1987. The last one was Crestor (rosuvastatin) which is the only one still under patent.
     
  5. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Expert

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    Probably because its debatable if it does anyway and the companies that have sponsored the research have never released the raw data.
    Depends on your definition of "high" of course. Looking at the UK parameters for Type 2 diabetics anything over 4.0 is "high" whereas more modern studies seem to think it should be over 10 being classed as "high". The PURE study shows over 8 I think as being less beneficial(i.e. higher overall mortality). What it boils down to is for those who have not had a cardiac event then statins are marginal to say the lease. If cholesterol is a lousy marker for CVD then why look at it unless it is stratospheric. Have a CAC scan and look at the actual calcium build up in the arteries.
     
  6. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you don't think "high" cholesterol isn't a risk factor for coronary events I've got some swamp land I'll send you in Florida! I am pimping statins for people with established disease: stent, heart attack, bypass. No question about statins and them. You mention the "CAC scan, which we call EBCT I think. Now that's controversial. Why? Because the mere presence of coronary calcium doesn't tell if the artery is blocked inside, the flow of blood. And if you have some what do they tell you to do about it? TAKE A STATIN. They are mostly useful if you have NO calcium. Then you're OK. But people I see are usually in their 60s and virtually none of them have zero calcium. I just gives them something more to worry about. Now there are newer imaging techniques that allow you to actually see/estimate % of the artery that is blocked. Those aren't used in a lot of places yet. Old fashioned angiography is still the "gold standard" for coronary blockages. Done my share of those over the years (not anymore though).
     
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