New diabetes care scheme to prevent amputation

Mon, 04 Feb 2013
Diabetes patients in Scotland are to receive new foot checks as part of a Government scheme designed to reduce rates of diabetes-related amputations.

According to the Scottish Government, more than 1350 people across the country have suffered a lower-limb amputation as a result of diabetes in the past year.

To help spot the early warning signs of diabetic foot disease and reduce the risk of limb loss, the Government has launched its new CPR for Feet scheme.

The programme will offer foot care checks in hospitals and foot clinics to everyone with a diagnosis of diabetes to identify patients with a foot ulcer or those at risk of developing one and give them the information and support they need to improve the health of their feet.

Public health minister Michael Matheson said: "Diabetes is a growing problem for Scotland ' we know at least '300million of hospital expenditure relates to diabetes treatment and the management of complications. Even more is spent on the rehabilitation and care needed after amputation."

"The impact of having a limb amputated can be devastating. However, in many cases, this is avoidable. That is why we are so committed to ensuring that people with diabetes have access to the best possible care so that the risks of amputation are minimised.

"The diabetes community have already made great progress - more people than ever before are now getting their feet checked and access to the care and support they need."

Diabetes is a leading cause of amputation, with those affected by the disease 15 times more likely to have a limb amputated than the general population.
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