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  1. My diabetes is well controlled now, and I want to keep it that way, but I used to like cheese or kippers with the Lidl rolls, and do miss them, so I have been thinking for some time about adding in lower carb 'fillers' to my standard bread recipe to see if I can reduce the impact of the bread flour, which is usually somewhere about 75 percent carbs. I can't get the specialist ingredients used by Lidl, but I thought that I would try to adapt my recipe to something I could manage to eat. I also have a lot of flour around from before I was diagnosed which would be rather a waste to just throw away.

    My July recipe was
    2 cups of bread flour
    1 cup of rye flour
    1 cup of chapati flour
    a small amount of lard
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 cup of psyllium flour
    200 gm of mixed milled seeds from Lidl - linseed chia and something else
    1 tsp sugar
    water to make a dough just too wet to knead - mix with a strong spatula or even garden trowel (I have a stainless steel one I keep just for the mixing of bread, and a large stainless steel bowl too).
    Leave the dough overnight for the gluten to develop.
    There was about 2 Kg of dough which I divided up into two large loaf tins.
    Next day mix in 2 sachets of fast acting yeast, knead well and put the dough into loaf tins in a warm place to rise, spray with a fine mist of water from time to time. Allow several hours and at least double in size - I call this brick bread as my previous loaves were white and fluffy, but it is not too bad if allowed a long rise. Once risen I removed it from the oven and increased the temperature to about 190 degrees C - the figures came off the dial surround long ago. I put in a bowl of water to make it humid and baked the loaves for 25 minutes then allowed them to cool out of the oven and took them out of the tins, but found they were still slightly damp underneath so I reheated the oven without the bowl of water, turned it off and then put the loaves in there to dry off.
    I would normally cook bread at a higher temperature, but the milled seed mix burns at 200 degrees, so slightly lower is better.
    After so long without bread it was far too good.
  2. 42
    My Hba1c is 42 - though really, with the heat and net sleeping well, and going back to work I suppose I could not really have expected anything very low - the boxes of strawberries might well have had something to do with it - and the melons nicely chilled in the fridge...
    At least the practice is taking some notice again.
    A suggestion to take statins was the first response.
  3. I was finally asked to make an appointment with the nurse to have further blood tests, and will get the results in August as I might well be away at a folk festival at the first appointment date offered.
    I was amused, as usual when my blood pressure was taken twice - plus the tourniquet had to be removed during the blood taking as it was leaking out around the needle, but then the hole sealed up almost at once, so I think my cardio vascular system is in good condition.
  4. My godmother died in June at the age of 89 - with children, grandchildren and great grandchildren and a lot of living done, but as I decided to attend the funeral and meet with family I have not seen in a decade, I discovered that she and several more of the family had/have diabetes.
    That means both of my parents could have had the genetic implications for it.

    My godmother was the last of the Tuvey children, my mother was her sister, which means I am now the oldest of the family.
    Of course I am the next generation, the oldest grandchild of Nana Tuvey - and we live to a good age as a rule, but even so - it is a sobering thought.
  5. I was talking to my sister, and her daughter is married to a type one diabetic.
    Not for the first time the family went out together and suddenly everything had to be stopped, they needed to treat a hypo - but the diabetic had nothing with him, so everyone was looking for sweets or a shop, they had to abandon everything planned for the day, get back to the car, drive to where they could buy a drink - and then a meal and then wait to see what the BG level was and then there was an injection of insulin required so back to the car and wait and check - and by then it was too late to do anything and so they went home.

    I know very well that a hypo can happen at any time, but as my sister said it is every time they want to go out, they have to wait until half the day has passed before leaving, and then there is some emergency - this time it was no hypo treatment, last time it was no insulin so they could not stay out and have a meal but had to drive home.

    It seems that he gets into a panic when things go wrong, yet makes no plans for his own safety - he also gets really angry when questioned - my sister asked if he had his insulin with him this time, as he did not have it with him on their last trip out, and said that he was very short with her. He really is not a man at peace with himself.
  6. The folk festival I am most involved in was last weekend - and the schools I have been involved with had teams there - the girls in their bright waistcoats got a lot of attention, and they did so well. There was a large procession and dancing all around the town. My daughter and son in law were there playing music for the young dancers and for Anonymous morris, the adult side we are with. We also went to various singing sessions.

    I got home absolutely exhausted at the end of each day, but it has been a wonderful success all round.
  7. We have had a proper family butcher around the corner ever since we moved here in the 1980s - they were the first people I told about my diagnosis as I went in to order a load of meat for the freezer.
    My husband called in to get some sausages and discovered that they were closing the next day.
    Apparently the owner, who is elderly has not been very well, and the two younger men must be close to retirement age or even past it, have been feeling the strain of keeping things going without him.
    My grandsons will miss the sausages, as that was always their first question when we arrived 'Have you bought some sausages?' right from when they could manage to say 'sausages' - with general joyful jumping up and down with cheering when I said 'of course'.
    Ah well - perhaps I can roast a chicken instead.
  8. I am having to remake a lot of clothes, either using the same materials of using the same pattern in a smaller size - I just realized how much smaller my waist is as the kilt I used to wear when diagnosed now wraps around twice rather than one and a half times.
    I think it was a fatty liver - my middle was rock hard so I could hardly bend over, and if I did I went dizzy.
    This chair is one with arms and goes up and down, but the more padded version is too high for me - it goes up and down, but goes ridiculously high and not low enough for my feet to be on the ground. That is so uncomfortable.
  9. Not that I am at all close to being skinny but this chair is getting very hard.
    I sit in it when using the computer and when practicing on my melodeons, and I am going to have to add extra padding as my own personal inbuilt layer seems to be ebbing away at quite a rate.
  10. I went down to Lidls on Christmas eve as I found that I did not have bread flour for the Yorkshire puddings.

    Whilst I was in there the manager began to put things beyond the tills to go for free.

    I got half a dozen boxes of button mushrooms and loads of bread - I don't eat it but the family do - a couple of bunches of flowers and a couple more things - it made the journey very worthwhile. I have a large freezer, so most of the bread went in there, and I have been indulging in mushrooms with every meal - I took some bread down to my daughter to go in her freezer - at least it was not all wasted.
    I am pleased that I can eat the revised recipe Yorkshire puddings without spiking - the three eggs, lots of fat and the larger amount of protein in the type of flour must combine - plus I make them smaller than I used to, though they do puff up remarkably.
  11. OK - how many saw that and thought 'Liar liar'?

    Yes - Queen - oh my.

    Over 40 years ago - it is on the TV at the moment - it has just got the the rock and roll ending, with Freddie prancing around the stage in his shorts.
  12. This morning I was only just 219 lb - and tonight I ate rather a lot of carbs and thought I'd be up about 10 at least - and I just got 7.6 mmol/l.
    I ate two big slices of a huge watermelon - and lots of peas with my salmon because they were all frozen in a large lump - and got 7.6.

    This supposed to be something requiring heroic determination and grim fortitude and suchlike - and it just isn't - it is all too easy.

    OK - maybe in a few years it might come back to bite me - maybe sooner - it could be just lulling me into some erroneous sense of having won.

    I have this feeling of being let down somehow. No titanic struggle to conquer my dark adversary - just getting quite normal numbers before even a year has passed.

    Ho hum.

    I know - I'll go and get another slice of that melon. It would be a pity of it went off or mouldy before it got eaten.
  13. Now down to 219 lb and my waist is reducing at speed.
    All without any effort.
    I have almost nothing to wear.
  14. I am now only just 220lb, and the skirt which I made is now definitely too large and will need to be worked on before I can wear it again without the two safety pins which are holding it on at the moment.
    My waist is still too large - I have a bay window feature, which, although it adds to the design of our house, it is not something I would chose to carry around with me on a daily basis.
    At this casual rate it might mean it takes two years to reduce down to the weight I think of as normal, but I am hopeful that I will be busy making new clothes for some time to come.
  15. this morning I tried on a skirt I made a little while ago, when my clothes started falling off, and saw that it is now on the point of being too large. It is a wrap over style and was on the loosest fastening when I made it, now it is on the tightest.
    I checked my weight, and it is now 221lb - which means I am losing about one and a half pounds in a month - not exactly fast, but I am not trying to lose weight, I just want normal BG levels. Anything else is a bonus.
    As I have been eating my apples - I have two trees in the garden and they are laden with fruit - I will have to pick them soon and see if I can store them, I am surprised that I have not gained weight, but I am far more active these days.
    I do not have an apple every day, and I do compensate for their extra carbs - but I am glad to be able to do something more normal for me. Last year the apples ripened later and I left them to fall and rot back into the soil, which did not feel right.
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