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“Bullied” to delete review of GP practice having given them a low rating.

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by ringi, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Firstly bullied may be too strong a work, but I can’t think of another word to sum it up.

    I left what I considered to be an even-handed review on NHS choices of the experience I have had with continently of care, none emergency appointment booking etc. I first checked that other reviewer on the NHS choose site gave the other side, in that you can always get to see a GP on the same day, if you log onto the booking system at the correct time.

    I left the review anonymously as I did not wish it to be found if someone googled for my name. The practice manager clearly spend considerable time working out who had left the review, it was a good bit of detective work.

    I got a phone call from the practice manager explaining that they run their appointment system that way as most people like being able to see a GP on the same day, regardless of continently of care. It was also explained to me, that if I did not withdraw my review, the low rating may result in them losing funding, due to fewer people signing up with them, and that would result in me getter a lower standard of care….. (And that it may result in the practice closing.)

    At no point was the practice manager nasty or threatening towards me, as I am a well educated middle-class person who is used to dealing with people in authority I did not find the practice manger intimidating. Other people are very likely to have found the manager intimidating and hence deleted their review.

    The practice manager seems to be more concerned with protecting the number of stars the practice has, then with learning how they could improve the service, and balance out the needs of different clients better.

    Now for the important question…..

    Has the same happened to anyone else when leaving reviews on NHS Chooses?
     
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    #1 ringi, Mar 13, 2018 at 6:24 PM
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  2. cmhdiabetes

    cmhdiabetes · Member

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  3. Orangeteddy

    Orangeteddy Prediabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Am I the only one to be fe up with the constant pestering for feedback from every aspect of daily life? Online pop ups, feedback requests on till receipts. Does anyone actually win the so called draw that they say you'll be entered into?
    As for the OPs experience with the GP surgery, I'd leave the feedback having bothered to give it. If the staff don't like it perhaps they can stop asking for feedback.
     
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  4. cmhdiabetes

    cmhdiabetes · Member

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    No, not in the way that you were singled out . BUT I did make a formal complaint after which the practice had to formally apologise in writing and during the attendent conversation with the practice manager an implied threat was made....that if I no longer had confidence in the medical staff at the practice then I could take myself elsewhere! Or that they would assume that I didn't have confidence and remove me from their list without discussion. The expression "lost confidence in" is used often to "get rid of" troublesome patients who are not obsequous enough in bending the knee to the doctors. Watch out for it.
     
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  5. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    Which begs the question, why have a review system (especially with the option of annonymity) in the first place? I would have stuck to my guns and told the manager of my intention to add to/edit my review in the light of his/her 'persuasion' tactics and citing absence of annonymity.
     
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  6. eggs11

    eggs11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Haven't ever written a review myself, but just have to say, it sounds very dodgy for them to try and persuade you to withdraw yours.
     
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  7. Tipetoo

    Tipetoo Type 2 · Expert

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    Pressured comes to mind at the moment.
     
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  8. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I can't as my wife works for the NHS and we have friends in high places, along with none of the other local GPs being any better. (They all think that a child with a cold should always get to see a GP the same day, and run their appointment system to enable it........)

    But if I can get evidence it is a common problem, I will see if I can get to speak to someone who can change the NHS chooses review system to stop it.
     
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  9. donnellysdogs

    donnellysdogs Type 1 · Master

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    Yep, in South Wales.. the GP Practice actually sent out letters to patients stating it was the patients fault that a nurse had to go.
     
  10. TheBigNewt

    TheBigNewt Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    It's weird I work at a VA. And the do pimp us to fill out surveys via Email (I never do). But I've not ever heard a patient comment that they got pimped to fill something out about their experience at the VA. I think the patients who get put in the hospital get called and the ED people get called right after they get out but the regular OP clinic patients I'm not so sure do.
     
  11. Guzzler

    Guzzler Type 2 · Master

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    In this respect the review is optional.
     
  12. tina_marie

    tina_marie Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    My husband tried leaving a review about a neurology appointment he had at our local hospital but had to change it several times before it got published . Someone had left a comment saying what's the point of getting patients to leave reviews if you don't let them write the truth . Well I guess the truth hurts when you have had a bad CQC report.
     
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  13. james11

    james11 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Less funding=fewer patients. .ideal u may be able to get an appointment then...our surgery used to be one doctor only ...could get an appointment anytime...now its 3 doctors 3 prescribing nurses...4 to6 week wait for routine appointment. ...u can phone for on the day if its urgent but i dont see my problem as urgent and if i take one of these slots im stopping a patient with an urgent issue fro being seen....u cant win with them ...then they want u to write nice things about them
     
  14. cmhdiabetes

    cmhdiabetes · Member

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    My goodness the professionalism of our medical practitioners beggers belief!!! But hospital/GP practices do do their best to guilt us into accepting **** treatment and service.
     
  15. pumas

    pumas Prediabetes · Active Member

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    Are you saying that Patients’ records were searched to find Mr/Ms Anonymous?
     
  16. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I think he did it from admin records, there was no need to look at clinical data to match me up to the review. (However, there are no reasons a practice manager should not look at clinical records when investigating a process issue. If we want the NHS to improve, we must except managers and accountants have some access to clinical data.)
     
  17. Crocodile

    Crocodile Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've never had that that experience. Needless to say though that the caller would simply get an ear full of expletives if they tried it on.
     
  18. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    OK so Mrs Ringi works for the NHS and knows lots of high ups so couldn't she have a word about the outrageous invasion of privacy that led to you being called? Personally I'd be livid that an anonymous comment had led to me being contacted as well as being pressurised into trying to make me change it. Are Practise Managers financially rewarded for good reviews? Maybe Mrs Ringi could find out for us as well as all the financial incentives for getting us onto various medications that appear to be either unnecessary or counter productive? After all it is "our NHS" isn't it?
     
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  19. Boo1979

    Boo1979 Other · Well-Known Member

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    Practices, and by extension their partners and managers, will almost certainly have some of their incentive payments linked to both patient numbers and patient satsfaction scores.
    When I worked as a professional lead in childrens mental health, patient satisfaction scores were seen as proxy data which could be extrapolated to be indicative of service efficacy and were highly scrutinised by commissioning bodies, even if in truth they were rubbish measures. I always thought it a real shame they looked at that data rather than the harder to quantify and harder to collect actual outcome data
     
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    #19 Boo1979, Mar 14, 2018 at 2:47 PM
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
  20. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I consider it to be no more an invasion of privacy than a hotel manager looking at a trip advisor review and trying to work out who left it, in both cases a pointless use of time, as they should be learning from reviews, not trying to get them removed.

    The NHS has much larger problems, hence it is not worth spending any director's time on this unless it was a common issue. Clearly, form the responses here, it is not a common issue. It does not help that practice manager (like most of primary care) are underpaid, and hence there are few top quality people who will take the job. (One of the reasons that GP practice keep combining with each other.)

    Indirectly, as there pay is benchmarked against other practice of the same size, and the size of a practice over the long term depends on how many people choose to sign up with them. If the size of a practice reduces, the Practise Manager has to find who to "let go"..... With "cherry picking" of the people with the least healthcare needs by the like https://www.gpathand.nhs.uk/ it is becoming more of an issue.

    see http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/gps-to-...reshold-under-nice-proposals/20009045.article for example.

    But the real issue is that most education of GPs is sponsored by the drugs companies, as the NHS will not pay the going rate for "continues professional education". Likewise nearly all medical research is paid for by drugs companies, along with most of the costs of running medical conferences.
     
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