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14 year old son seems to be showing first signs of finding it all to much !!

Discussion in 'Parents' started by bickmops, Sep 14, 2015.

  1. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    My son was diagnosed 3 years ago , 2 weeks before starting secondary school , he's very sporty and we have done everything to keep it going , it really is his life !! Lately he's been saying life's not that good , when we ask why he just says you don't understand what it's like , it's not major and he doesn't have any signs of depression , I just need some advise on the right way to deal with this so it doesn't get worse , teenagers are hard to deal with at the best of time , levels are up and down constantly !! This upsets him , he does try x
     
  2. ButtterflyLady

    ButtterflyLady Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Maybe he would like to join this forum and get some support from other people with T1, and others his age? When someone says life's not that good, that could be a sign of depression so maybe he should see his doctor, alone if it enables him to open up more. Re his swinging levels, maybe he should see his nurse or doctor to get his diabetes management optimised. Hormones can affect things too.

    You are a wonderful parent for caring and being alert enough to notice the issues and ask for help. All the best. xx
     
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  3. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Thanks for that , I'm going to tell his doctor next week at his appointment , reading some of these forums makes you realize how much young people struggle with this condition ! I tell him the stories I read and he seems intersted , hopefully one day he will join x x
     
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  4. jcdevine

    jcdevine Type 1 · Member

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    I am so sorry to hear this. Teenage years are bad enough as it is! I was diagnosed at age 4 and had a tough time through my teens in many ways, but the big difference for me was having been on one of the (then BDA) holidays for young people, at Springhill. It gave me confidence, better understanding of my condition, and it was amazing to be among other kids who knew exactly how I felt. Sadly that one is now closed, but I think Diabetes UK still run holidays where kids meet each other, have a great time and get to feel much less alone in their struggle. If your son hasn't already tried one, I would definitely give it a go. Good luck! xx
     
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  5. mich-elle4

    mich-elle4 · Newbie

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    My son was twelve when he was diagnosed. he had a scare when he was fourteen and lost all his confidence. He went to counselling sessions which really did help and is now fantastic with his carb counting and has an excellent hba1c. I totally get teenagers and diabetes are hard work. My daughter has now been diagnosed as well!! help him through as much as he wants you and there is light at th
     
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  6. Serendipity21

    Serendipity21 · Member

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    I was diagnosed at 3 years and have always managed to hold a positive outlook on my life and have never let it stop me, on saying that... I still struggled immensely in my late teens and early twenties. That age is difficult for anyone without throwing Diabetes in the Mix too. I'm 27 now, but just over a year ago, I received and email in my junk mail from DiabetesUK (still not sure how it got there or why I checked it) asking for young adults with type 1 to get involved in running family days for children and teenagers. This was the first time I'd met other young diabetics my age, and I saw how great it was for young kids and teens to meet others who just have that understanding...that's not to say friends and family don't do their best to undertand, I really appreciate the love and support I get, but there is something to be said in meeting others who literally do just 'get it'... It really made me wish that I had got involved with DiabetesUK and met others a long time ago, which maybe might have prevented me feeling less isolated when I went through times of struggle. If there's one thing I've learnt is that good things happen when diabetics get together; I have met some of the most interesting, incredible and inspirational people through diabetes; people I now call my friends and speak and see regularly. #Type1Uncut has a YouTube channel with videos on different topics made by people living with type 1 for people with type 1 (I'm part of the #Type1uncut project) and there are specific ones on sport too. It can be daunting and when I was a teenager the last thing I wanted to do was do anything with my diabetes outside of clinic (that was bad enough) but if there was one thing I could tell my younger self was to get out there and get involved with other type 1s. Good Luck.
     
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  7. nigelho

    nigelho Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Check with his DSN/GP about the type 1 management DAFNE COURSE.
     
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  8. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Thank you all so much for giving me so much info , we have done a sponser walk and he went on a activity day with his team , only girls attended !! But he enjoyed it ! Everything was fine until he had to do split levirmir ! I'm going to talk to his team , it seems it's one injection to much and I'm worried he doesn't take it !! We have always injected levirmir for him , but he won't let us do the morning one ..., could be just paranoid and maybe he is !! Thank you all so much , really helps talking to people who have lived thru there teens with type 1 , he doesn't like talking to me at the moment , like all 14 year olds !! I'll never give up trying and one day I know acceptance will come x x
     
  9. Chezabelle

    Chezabelle Type 1 · Newbie

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    Hello, I've been a type 1 diabetic since being 16, I'm now 34! I've been through three pregnancies and in the final pregnancy I was offered a pump, this has really helped with control of blood sugars and you can suspend it if you're wanting to do sports etc, it's a horrible feeling when you're in public wondering if you will go low and can't be easy for a teenager. Maybe ask about a pump and have him carry glucose tablets at sports times? May make him feel he has more control. Good luck.
     
  10. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hey there,
    Ask your son to take a look at www.teambloodglucose.com - and consider joining the Sporty Diabetic Type 1's Facebook group. Sport and diabetes can work together - it's just a case of understanding how the body behaves with activity. Diabetes certainly doesn't have to hold your son back. For inspiration take a look at the Novo Nordisk team of pro riders in the Tour of Britain - all have diabetes and all are incredible athletes.
     
  11. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Thanks for your reply , the pump is a ongoing topic , he does seem to be listening that it could help ( fingers crossed ) and he just took the link you kindly sent , he lives for sport ! He had a letdown when first diagnosed as he was sat on the side line to rest ( ignorant managers who thought he was not able to play at a high level ) we got thru that ! it was as bad as the diagnosis at the time !! There's so much negative comments that teens are told and there so impressionable !! He is showing a lot of interest in me being on this forum , I'd love him to join I think he finally thinks I joined the twenty first century !! Thanks again x x
     
  12. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Sorry he does play football , he's in the top division and plays for the school , he also picked sports science !!! Not easy to always deal with
     
  13. Chezabelle

    Chezabelle Type 1 · Newbie

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    Have a look at Medtronic website or on YouTube their are videos that explain how the pump is set up and used, I found this really helpful. And it's just one needle every three days, pretty discrete when you're giving yourself insulin, and the glucose monitor sends a signal to the pump to work out how much insulin you need etc. works it all out for you to keep a balance. Have a look and I'll happily answer any questions if I can
     
  14. alexander st clair

    alexander st clair Type 1 · Member

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    Hi my name is Alex I am now 27 I have had it since I was practically one, I can completely understand your sons frustrations and and fears believe it or not. Having diabetes type 1 is treated very non sealant when I was at both school and college. The thing is it affects every aspect of his life, both with fear, frustration, miss understanding and heavily complicates normal relationships. How ever there is light at the end of the tunnel it does get better, you only have to learn how. I was bought up believing that sugar was BAD and if I consumed it I was there for bad. Now as a teenager with hormones you are told your hormones will fluctuate his levels all though this is somewhat true, as a teen it was more not remembering to dose and at some points hating it.

    This is really simple comes down to the why me complex? . Basically hes probably thinking why me and although he's been diagnosed and told how its come about maybe shock induced or a hereditary procedure, he will not want to relate to this or believe it, As having it can feel like your simple freedoms are taken like that of a prisoner. With school & social stresses he feels probably like I did, like I was in a prison, Both of his own mind and body. ( remembering he's quite young) Now when I was his age with exactly the same issues of fluctuating levels I was constantly lead to believe I was to blame, this is not the case because as a young child your also lead to believe or in my case this is for life. So another huge anchor is sat on your shoulders. So to sum this up (points that could be bringing him down: school, relationships, friendships, himself, his condition(mixed feelings), home life( not being able to communicate) and hospital appointments ( fear of being told its his fault.)

    Now the best thing as a kid would be supportive parents( not saying your not at all in fact you asking for help shows exactly the opposite.) what he needs support with will be the conversations with his doctor, pediatrician. He needs what the doctors think not tell him and how what they say can help him. I am a Novorapid user meaning I inject before I eat anything. and have one night time injection as well. I had to learn how to use this properly, not as doctor stated eat only healthy and you will survive! ..... <---- lame and script driven advice. I inject for exactly what I want when I want including Cake, doughnuts, drinks etc. And as a fact have levels of 5.6 as of today. Thing is he needs to know what insulin hes using and for what he is consuming and taking it for and how to use that to his advantage. My best suggestion is talking to his doctor about a Bertie course if hes like me. if not he needs to ask his doctor how best he can reclaim his freedom. to live as normal as anyone else cause in a world of discrimination this is what we all want. I hope this has helped you and your son build a better understanding of each other and how you both can beat it to suit you. Your son is only to blame if hes doing it deliberately which I highly doubt or like I believe hes just needs to know more and how best to make it suit him.
     
  15. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Thank
    Thank you so much both of you ..... You really did give me a understanding about how he feels ....... When his levels are high he always acts like I will blame him !! I've always been confused why he felt like that !! I have often said "you must have eaten something '' how ignorant of me ... He prob hasent !! I understand about hormones and I never have put him on a treat free diet , he does eat everything , as long as he takes insulin .... But in hindsight to be questioned when your levels are high and don't know why must be so horrible ...!! Oh my god I think I realise how our communication seems to be breaking down so glad you gave me that insight thank you so much ... X x x
     
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  16. Chezabelle

    Chezabelle Type 1 · Newbie

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    Something as simple as coming down with a cold can make your body produce glucose, hot baths can bring your blood sugars down too, it's taken me years to learn how different things can affect my sugar levels, many people think it's about what you eat but there are many factors, and, he will hear "you can't have that, your a diabetic' all of the time, it's the most frustrating thing ever! You will absolutely get through it, it's a tough age and it's a very frustrating illness, the media seem to cover type 2 a lot and how it's brought on by 'lifestyle ' choices! Many people aren't aware of type 1 and that it actually wasn't our own fault and we can't do anything about it, it can be frustrating but you'll get there.
     
  17. bickmops

    bickmops · Active Member

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    Just the other day he had his yearly bloods and the lady doing the test was saying to him , "I could never inject myself " I couldent believe it .., as if he had a choice .. I knew her knowledge wasent great when she asked if he was on tablets or insulin !! As adults we can take it but kids feel embarased .. Just checked him and he was 15.4 and instead of asking why ??? I realized he had been playing rough and tumble with the dog , we rechecked in 10 minutes and he drooped to 10.6 !! So glad I dident ask him "why " I actually noticed for the first time he was worried about checking himself .... So sad !! At least I'm learning and getting advice from people who have lived with this x x thank you so much !!! I feel like where back on track although I know there will be ups and downs ...
     
  18. alexander st clair

    alexander st clair Type 1 · Member

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    so glad I can help

    things that increase levels - lack of movment ie Sitting / sleeping and in school its 7 hours of sitting so more insulin may help but ask doc.

    and I have found stress has an increased affect on my sugars (bolus) so perhaps ask about ratios :)
     
  19. slip

    slip Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    What a great thread, OP asked for help and advice, got some spectacular advice and insight, now understands and treats her son differently - brill!

    I developed T1 slightly later in life so didn't go through my teenage years with it, but I have a better understanding what any young T1 must be going through than most (like most of us here) - and I really feel for them, it must be so so difficult.

    @bickmops - Wishing you and your son all the best and well done for be a A* parent!
     
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  20. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest


    Have you read this @bickmops?

    A special note to parents.

    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/a-special-note-to-parents.78413/
    Might give you some insight into how he reacts with certain situations and why.
    Take care,

    CC
     
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