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Type 2 2 questions for you wonderful people

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by rickydoo, May 15, 2021.

  1. rickydoo

    rickydoo · Member

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    Newly diagnosed 27 year old here. Been reading up on type 2 diabetes, since my diagnoses and the information surrounding my cells no longer receiving glucose due to insulin resistance, is confusing. If they’re not receiving glucose, how do i have any energy at all? Or is it a “reduced” amount of glucose entering my cells now?

    My second question is, as a type 2 diabetic with an A1c of 7.5 and blood glucose level of 159mg/dL when diagnosed, not taking insulin but taking metformin, when should I expect to, if at all, require insulin shots?
     
  2. ziggy_w

    ziggy_w Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @rickydoo,

    Interesting questions.

    This is how I understand insulin resistance and T2 diabetes. As a T2, there will be some glucose entering your cells, albeit usually at the cost of much higher insulin levels. The glucose entering cells however is often less than for non-diabetics, which may be associated with feeling tired, exhausted and always hungry (which we often seem to observe in T2s). Furthermore, the high insulin levels required to get the glucose into the cells is preventing the body from accessing body fat for energy. This on the one hand exacerbates the feeling of tiredness and hunger (leading to more frequent eating and continued higher insulin levels) and on the other hand makes it harder to lose weight (as energy stored in form of body fat cannot be burned). So, it seems to be a bit of a vicious cycle.

    As to your second question -- my hope is never for many of us T2s. When I was diagnosed six years ago my levels were much higher than yours with an HbA1c of 11.3% and levels of 300 mg/dl. At the time, my GP told me that there would be no way around insulin for me. However, after changing to low-carb/keto, my levels dropped back to normal, non-diabetic levels. The next HbA1c was 5.3% and no more talk of requiring insulin.

    So, there is every reason to be hopeful imo.
     
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  3. searley

    searley Type 1 · Moderator
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    1, the cells are not receiving glucose as effectively so early stages you are still receiving enough to have energy but not enough to keep your blood glucose in range.. as you become more resistant this will change as you receive less into you system for energy

    2, a lot of people have reversed or put into remission the T2 with lifestyle changes.. the easiest being a low carb diet.. buy making these changes you could well prevent progression to more medication/insulin and maybe even remove the need for it altogether

    Have a good read through the forums there are some useful links in my signature.


    I’m not asking this to be rude.. are you overweight? The only reason I ask is if you are not then it’s possible you are not T2
     
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  4. KennyA

    KennyA Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    You've had a good answer to the first question. On the second part, you shouldn't expect to progress to insulin. You would if you do nothing about your situation and maintain a high carb diet. On the other hand, given that you do know what the problem is, if you significantly reduce your carb intake you almost certainly will find that your BG falls pretty sharply as a consequence, and you would not require metformin let alone insulin.
     
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  5. rickydoo

    rickydoo · Member

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    Do my numbers seem off? Yeah I’m 260 lbs 5’10”
     
  6. rickydoo

    rickydoo · Member

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    Thank you, Kenny!
     
  7. VashtiB

    VashtiB Type 2 · Moderator
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    Hello and welcome,

    You have already received some great responses. Have you got a meter? If not I really recommend that you get one. A meter is the tool that will help you know what your levels are and what effect the food you are eating has on your levels.

    Read around the forum- there is a lot of great information there. Continue to ask questions. At first there seems a lot to get your head around but this site is a great way to educate yourself quickly.

    Welcome.
     
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