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Type 2 20 year old T2 in need of some guidance and assurance

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by GenBomaYE, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    Hi,

    I am a 20 years old recently diagnosed diabetic (T2 mostly regardless gonna have it confirmed next week with C-Peptide test)
    I feel very anxious and scared that this is going to lead me to early and miserable death with diabetic complications. Read multiple studies about how T2 diabetes is more vicious in younger people and leads to complications early and higher mortality rate.
    It also mentions that B-cell deterioration is more rapid in young onset T2s.

    Now i've done enough reasearch and have been on moderately low carb diet for past 2 weeks,My HBA1c was 12.9%, fasting BG of around 270s(Mg/dl) during diagnosis. I was on lantus (10 units) and Janumet 50|500 for about 2 weeks and since i reacted really well to meds and to diet changes my BG now averages around 80-130 and my meds currently have been reduced to Janumet 50|1000(Sitagliptin and Metformin).
    I am pretty confident that i can get to non-diabetic numbers if i maintain my current BG.

    My main concerns are that will i be able to sustain it long term? and Does maintaining non-diabetic numbers mean that the chance of complications are little to none?
     
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    #1 GenBomaYE, Jun 15, 2019 at 3:10 PM
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2019
  2. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum @GenBomaYE okay colour me impressed with your numbers already! Always best to wait on a full diagnosis of course but I was on the same meds as you myself last year and I managed to get mine into ‘remission’ within a month of low carbing. I was diagnosed in my 20’s here too, at 27 in fact but I do believe that if you take steps to normalise your blood glucose you can live life like anyone else. Even non-diabetic people get struck down with all sorts of things that we could do but we know what to do to prevent that. I’ve found lower carbs, lower frequency of eating can do wonders for us and if you can sustain it long term? That’s what you have to ask yourself, I feel I can do this long term if needed but it’s always individual. Honestly a lot of these horror stories are from the pool of complacent youths that keep going as normal. Young or adult, it’s making the change that counts.
     
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  3. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    I have been lurking around a bit and am familiar with your posts and it made me calm down a bit. You are a wonderful person :D

    Thanks for this appreciate it.
     
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  4. Caeseji

    Caeseji Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    You are so welcome! I remember how I was when I first came here and trust me, everyone will have your back and thank you so much! I do try :cat: I’m happy to help and you’re a wonderful person too!
     
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  5. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    Maintaining it long term is entirely possible but some people suffer from burn out and go back to old habits. That's understandable to a degree because we are all on the quantity of life vs. the quality of life roundabout. There is no doubt that keeping normal numbers will lessen complications of diabetes but it won't stop you falling under a bus.
     
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  6. urbanracer

    urbanracer Type 1 · Moderator
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    Welcome to the forums @GenBomaYE . Seems like you crept in whilst nobody was looking.

    If you've been lurking, have you seen the information we try to give to new arrivals? If not, click on the links in any moderator's signature. ( Turn your phone sideways to reveal signature panels).
     
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  7. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    I am aware of it. This community is incredible
     
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  8. Veryanxious

    Veryanxious Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I am also 28, I was at pre diabetic state when I was 27. Came as a shock to me as well. I have tried to avoid diabetes since I was 20 and it caught me at 27 inspite of trying.
    What i have learnt from my anxieties and my pre diabetes is that no one knows what future holds. Just keep doing what works for you and try to think about the problem when it happens not before.
     
  9. pavlosn

    pavlosn Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi and welcome

    It is always a shock to be faced with a diabetes diagnoses, all the more so I expect when so young. I was 44 when i was diagnosed with t2 ten years ago, so quite a bid older than you, but it was still an emotional sledgehammer blow.

    But we have to learn to go with the cards that life deals us and distinguish between what we can or we can not control.

    Nobody knows what tomorrow will bring. All the statistics about probabilities of developing complications are just that statistics, the chances of an average diabetic developing a specific complication. And averages are unfortunately affected by the many diabetics that are not as well controlled as they should be.

    Try to turn your justified worries about complications into a positive, into motivation to stat on top of this condition.

    I am not going to suggest that sticking to a healthy diabetes management regime for the rest of your life will be easy. Having fallen off that particular wagon myself on more than one occasion I would be the last one to suggest that. But as they say it is not how many times you fall that counts but how many times you get back up. And who is to say that you will not be much more successful than I have been.

    My advise is that you make healthy choices finding alternatives to harmful options that you actually enjoy. We are always much better at sticking with something that we enjoy rather than something that is just good for as. So take up a physical activity thst you enjoy doing and find what food that does not raise glucose levels you like and ensure that is available to you.

    Also restricting temptations to stray by not having high carb food easily available in your house should also help.(not always easy when you have a family, my fridge is almost always full of "forbiden fruit", I cant deny these to my wife and son just because I happen to have diabetes).

    Allow yourself to cheat with the occasional treat if you feel you must but ensure that this does not become a habit.

    Finally watch out against complacency. Thst has always been my own downfall. I get on top of my diabetes, have my levels under control and after a while it all seems easy. I get complacent and start to slip. Don't fall in the same trap.

    Diabetes is not a death sentence nor a guarantee of horrible complications. Respect it and you can still have a long and satisfying life. In many cases because of the healthier lifestyle changes, a healthier life.

    But ignore it at your peril.

    Best of luck

    Pavlos
     
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  10. JoKalsbeek

    JoKalsbeek Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    I don't know if it counts as "long term", but I started low carbing 3 years ago and progressed to keto on the way... No problems whatsoever with it. And dropped all meds in 3 months. (Could've done it sooner, if I'd not made a bundle of mistakes and my specialist wasn't operating under the illusion that the amazing drop in HbA1c was due to a pinch of Gliclazide, haha). Anyway... Keep up the good work, who knows, you could be without medication in just a few more weeks and solidly in the non-diabetic range. However you do it is your choice of course. But you're well on your way, so what you're doing is working.

    When diagnosed we basically are told T2 is a progressive disease, and we're 100% doomed. Turns out that's true, if you don't change your diet. With a diet change however, well... It's a whole different ballgame. You'll be okay.
    Hugs,
    Jo
     
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  11. Debandez

    Debandez Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Hi @GenBomaYE and welcome.
    It's devastating when you get the diagnosis. That's how I felt too. And you are just 20 so even moreso for you. But you have taken the bull by the horns and are seeing great results already. Low carb works for so many of us and it obviously works for you. Well done on your brilliant results.

    I was diagnosed Dec 17. I've been a member of this wonderful forum ever since. I've read many posts from members on here and many others too who have been eating this way to control blood sugars for years with great success. The key to the success is to make this a way of eating for life. You will find as you go along the food you can have that doesn't effect your blood sugars. Check out Diet Doctor and Libbys ditch the carbs. And there is a wonderful thread on here:

    https://www.diabetes.co.uk/forum/threads/what-have-you-eaten-today.75781/unread

    I'm quite boring in what I eat to be honest (not brilliant in the kitchen,,,,,very lazy!). I do avoid bread (I do have the occasional slice of low carb bread when my readings are particularly low), I swap rice for cauli rice which is surprisingly good taste wise. Pasta I replace with veg so for example my bolognese sauce I have with green beans or broccoli. Potatoes I dont miss to be honest. Many replace with celeriac but i dont bother. Chips, I substitute with halloumi fries which are amazing. I thought I would miss cereals but I'm more than happy to avoid now I know just how unhealthy they are! I quite often skip breakfast, give my pancreas a rest. Just coffee and cream. My hba1c came down quickly and at my last appointment my DN said I was now in remission. And I do have the occasional treat here and there for example on holiday but I have managed to remain focused. I have seen some slip off the wagon, sometimes life gets in the way.

    I can see you have read a lot of studies that point to negative conclusions. One thing i have learned is research can't always be trusted. I take a lot of what I read where research has been involved with a pinch of salt now. I feel that many of the people in the negative research are probably following the advice usually given at diagnosis. The advice many of us are trying hard to highlight to the powers that be that is just not good for us. That's another story!

    You are doing fantastic. Well done again.

    If you enjoy reading I highly recommended Jason Fung and The Diabetes Code. Dr Sarah Hallberg and Dr Ken Berry are both excellent too. Check out all their videos on YouTube.
     
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  12. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    I will definitely check them out.

    Thanks for looking out for me appreciate it :)
     
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  13. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    Thank you very much
     
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  14. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    I know i have some long years ahead of me and i will for sure keep your advice in my mind

    Thank you
     
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  15. GenBomaYE

    GenBomaYE Type 2 · Member

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    True, a bit anxious about all this still hopefully it reduces with time
     
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