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A bit confused about fasting

Discussion in 'Fasting' started by Juicyjan53, Jan 10, 2016.

  1. Juicyjan53

    Juicyjan53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hello. I'm a little confused over fasting for type2. Wouldn't your blood sugar drop and cause a problem with hypo? Does fasting mean no food or drink at all or like the 5:2 a lot less food on a fasting day? It doesn't seem to make sense although I know that a lot do it. I'm a good weight and bmi 24 so would it be good for someone like me or more beneficial for people carrying a bit more weight? :angelic: Thanks, Jan x
     
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  2. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Moderator
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    The first thing to factor in is medication. Gliclazide, insulin or other bg lowering meds would make me be wary. But Insulin dependent T2s fast for hours while doing basal testing, so it isn't of itself, always an issue, but they need to know what they are doing and adjust medication accordingly.

    After that, what about any other medical conditions? Both @nosher and I have reactive hypoglycaemia, and we both fast. But because of differences in the way our RH works, i think he water-fasts, while I fat-fast.

    Then there is the weight issue. Fasting to lose weight means you wouldn't eat extra between fasts. Fasting and avoiding weight loss means you would.

    And the fasting food choices, i mean, why fast part of the time and then eat rubbish the rest of the time? So careful choices needed there.

    I'm rather a believer in the idea that the body should (if fed properly*) find its own healthy weight - which doesn't necessarily correspond with BMI tables, or what we want to see in the mirror.

    * by 'fed properly' i mean fed below its personal carb-tolerance-level, whatever that may be, and running below its personal-fat-threshold, while getting all necessary nutrients without eating processed foods. But since that healthy weight is, for obese lil' ol' me, a pipe dream at the moment, i accept that its a very personal view of mine that no one else may share.
     
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  3. Tal

    Tal Type 2 · Member

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    I'm mildly pre diabetic. I went from 94Kg to 75Kg with, amazingly, no problems at all by fasting for 6 days running a few times.(I do drink tea with milk in, and LOTS of water). I monitor my blood sugar and ketone levels. The BS stayed around 4.5. mmol/L. The ketone level started rising after a day or two and generally stayed within the normal operating level of 3 to 6 mmol/L. The hunger wears off as the ketone backup energy system kicks in. I tend to feel more alert and energetic while on a fast (though I could enjoy a meal greatly if I think about it. All a lovely surprise I wish I'd known this earlier!
    Fasting is said to give the liver, kidneys and pancreas a break, during which they clear out the debris of unhealthy cells. Our bodies seem to have evolved to do this. Highly recommended, but there are possible dangers of keto acidosis (bad, unlike ketosis which is good) That's why I invested in a ketone meter and expensive strips
    Hope this helps!
     
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  4. Juicyjan53

    Juicyjan53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks both for your responses. I think I'll just carry on with what I'm currently doing and see how I get on - it still sounds a bit scary to me :***:
     
  5. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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  6. Robbity

    Robbity Type 2 · Expert

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    No-one is obliged to fast if they don't want or need to. You'll find what's best tor your body which may not be the same as anyone else. As a type 2, managing your diet may well be enough to control your glucose levels, and reduce some weight.

    Ketoacidosis is mainly a concern for type 1 diabetics or type 2s on insulin. It's caused by a combination of high glucose and ketone levels and a serious lack of insulin, which won't be the case for pre-diabetics or type 2s on medication, or diet only - they have sufficient insulin in their bodies under normal circumstances to prevent this happening.

    Robbity
     
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  7. 4ratbags

    4ratbags Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Ive just started doing 16/8 where you fast for 16 hrs and can eat for 8 hrs and I have found it really easy as the first twelve hours are basically taken up by sleeping. I always thought I would never be able to do it but it is actually very easy.
     
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  8. Juicyjan53

    Juicyjan53 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thinking about it, I'm probably already doing it by default. I don't eat after about 9pm, then don't eat again until about 12.30pm the following day ;) duh...
     
  9. sarah_chadwick

    sarah_chadwick Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I fast on 5:2, eat a meal of 500 calories at lunchtime on a Monday and Wednesday, eating a low carb diet on my normal working days, my body has got used to it now and I don't feel hungry on my fast days, drinking plenty of water and tea helps to fill you up. On the normal eating days, I don't have the urge to stuff my face either, I might have a treat at the weekend (an egg custard or small packet of crisps) but that's about it. Been doing this since 3rd week in January, with a steady loss of around 1 pound per week, hit a plateau just before Easter but back it seems to have caught up since.
     
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  10. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Fasting along with controlled curb eating can result in improved insulin sensitivity. But if you eat much curbs after the fast, the fast becomes mostly pointless. Therefore control your curbs to under 100g per day (no added sugar, no ready meals, no wheat in anything, little rice, little potatoes.) before trying fasting.
     
  11. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    Personally I do both intermittent fasting (no breakfast) and fewer than 20g of carbs per day. Seems to work ok for me.
     
  12. Nicksu

    Nicksu Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I find a 24 hour fast easy to do - particularly on the weekend. Basically have my last meal at the parents on Saturday pm and then don't eat until the next day in the evening. You barely notice - just keep drinking water and find other things to do (its amazing how many food adverts there are on TV!).
     
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  13. ringi

    ringi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    There been research (not on people with Type2) that fed two random chosen groups of people the same food, half the people had the food at breakfast time and the other half had the food just before bed. The people who had to food just before bad put on weight, the people who had it at breakfast time lost weight.

    Hence if (more likely when) I start intermittent fasting I will not be avoiding breakfast, but I will give the controlled carbs (under 100g) a few weeks first and then decide if I need to go low carbs before moving onto IF.
     
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  14. bulkbiker

    bulkbiker Type 2 · Oracle

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    We are all an n=1 experiment..
     
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  15. James2

    James2 · Well-Known Member

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    hi
    i have type2 diabetes
    i have noticed a change by doing and 16 /8 fast the time of the fast is flexible , so i eat between 12 miday and 8pm and drink water to keep hydrated as i am diuretic for my high B/P
    however i need to loose more weight so look at including 5/2, however it is about finding out what works for you .i periodically take my blood sugar levels and the 16/8 seems to have helped

    best wishes
    James 2
     
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  16. Netty144

    Netty144 Type 2 · Active Member

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    I have just done my second 16/8 hr fast, my bs have gone up, last night 6.1, 5.30am 6.9 and 11 am 7.2, I'm on metformin 3x 500mg daily I have always been told to take my meds with food?
    Is it a case of working through and my bs will stabilise or not to fast.
     
  17. Resurgam

    Resurgam Type 2 (in remission!) · Expert

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    I found that not eating for too long just on a normal day brought back the plummeting energy levels in mid afternoon.
    I now eat a bit earlier but only a few carbs and can go through to dinner time no problem.
    I think it came back when I reduced my insulin resistance, but it was a feature of my teens and twenties until I changed my job to one where I ate early and then went through to dinner time too busy to eat.
     
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