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Another wake up call at my prosthetic centre

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by PenfoldAPD, Jun 20, 2016.

  1. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    I tried to address the insulin resistance, the weight, the lack of exercise, rather than simply try not to need insulin and carry on as is.
    I assume I still produce it in a reasonable quantity, as I have good BG, Hba1c, and still eat carbs when I need to.

    Despite the myth, all carbs aren't by any means equal, quantity, GI, GL, exercise, mixture of the meal, all have an effect.
    The only way to understand is to test, yourself, and realise what patterns exist.
    Then control, and lack of any complications is possible, without needing to exclude carbs, as there are many times when I simply don't have a choice without losing my lifestyle at the same time.
     
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  2. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I've found once I can function normally I can exercise and fight the cause. When I'm ill I cannot feel optimistic nor think about changing to a diet which gives very small visible benefits.
    I restrict my diet to painful measures and alienate friends to do so. I've lost drinking friends and socialising without a care is a distant memory. Sisters and friends no longer invite me out to get drunk. No meals out unless I organise what I'll have first. No more spontaneous social life.
    No more heavy carb meals. Unless I want to be 30st on insulin to match.
     
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  3. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    It is definitely a lifestyle change.
    But it does get better.
    I probably spent a year or more watching what I ate, then a version of the Newcastle diet at the end to mop up any excess weight.
    But it's an ongoing challenge after that. But not too difficult.
    If I do socialise, I need to burn it off again later. But I can socialise again. I do drink a lot less though. But then again, I didn't normally get drunk, and not through abstinence, just it has little effect on me. Years of mis spent youth. I simply eat the best choice, and vary the amount to suit.
    I don't mind leaving food on the plate now.
    So, hang on in there, it will get better, the lighter days do follow the darker ones.
     
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  4. TooManyCrisps

    TooManyCrisps Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    The fear of losing my sight was what prompted me from the moment of diagnosis to try to take control of this. My dad is T2 with shocking control, and even though he's only 75 he has had very poor mobility for over 15 years due to neuropathy in his leg. He's on massive doses of insulin. I really don't want to end up like him.

    Love the Lady Bracknelll paraphrase :)
     
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  5. Emilian14

    Emilian14 Type 2 · Member

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    Wow this its new for me i was not thinking that you can lose your leg from diabetes
     
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  6. Indy51

    Indy51 Type 2 · Expert

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    When I first joined this forum, there was a poster who had a signature along the lines of "I want to die with my feet on". I thought it was quite a witty alternative to dying with your boots on and it really struck a chord.

    But the eyesight is the absolute scariest for me - I want to preserve my sight for as long as possible, especially with a family history of macular degeneration waiting in the wings.
     
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    #26 Indy51, Jun 21, 2016 at 6:51 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 21, 2016
  7. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    I saw in another thread about anxiety in diabetes. This also reminded me of having undiagnosed diabetes when I was 18yrs old and suffering hypos from nights out. Another reminder of being diabetic at an earlier age than my diagnosed age of 31. (14yrs ago approx.)
    I know I was diabetic at 6 or 7yrs old with symptoms. (Nearly 40yrs a diabetic).
    Thank god I have no complications except high blood pressure and excessive weight. Take the weight off me and maybe blood pressure might go?
    Does any diabetics live symptom free, even with good control?
    I would have to say - yes. I'm hoping that is me once I shift my weight.
    @SunnyExpat has given me hope and knowledge to carry on.
    I was doubting myself and thinking I was fighting a fight I cannot win. Fighting thee flab. Thanks @PenfoldAPD for believing in me.
    I think my family and friends just won't believe I can lose until they see it. They had me convinced, too.
    The loss in the past has been using extreme starvation (now underactive thyroid because of it). I have gym'd everyday and then jogged long distance. Everyday without fail, which I think has enhanced my insulin resistance now due to having more of a fat threshold without heavy exercise regime.
    Now I'm trying lchf and stressfree exercise.
    God only knows the answer. Newcastle diet tick, IF tick now lchf sugar diet.
    Lchf has been brilliant on my bgs so common sense tells me its a winner. A winner I'm keeping and i modify to tick me along.
    I think when I'm ready I'll have another war on my weight but for now losing a lb a week will keep me happy-ish. :confused:
     
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  8. PenfoldAPD

    PenfoldAPD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like the course is working out for you @ickihun now you just have to follow it, easier said than done. I think there are many diabetics on here who are controlling through diet and have little symptoms. I know of someone else away from here who does the same - he even eats porridge! His type 2 regressed when he fixed his diet.

    Life as a diabetic is a challenge, partly I find due to constant need to make informed choices and you can't just poddle through life - well not if you want to keep good control. Here I am stressing about my post swim 8.7 when actually I should know that if I slap myself I can get that down. So I'll be sticking to the good food (which lets be honest I love) and expecting my numbers to be down in the 5s again soon - coz what's life about if you don't have goals :)

    Have a good day x
     
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  9. PenfoldAPD

    PenfoldAPD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    @Emilian14 in extreme cases it might happen, part of your medical care on diagnosis will be seeing the podiatrist to check you out, and you'll then have regular check.
     
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  10. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    While certainly extreme, sadly not as uncommon as we would all like it to be. In 2011-14 135 amputations (including "minor" amputations of toes) were performed in the uk per week due to diabetes - https://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/jul/15/rise-diabetes-amputations-figures

    Will try to post something more uplifting next time ...
     
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  11. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    The most common problem is loss of feeling in the foot or leg through neuropathy then a cut or blister doesn't get felt nor protected so goes gangrenous and needs removing as diabetes uncontrolled prevents healing.
    Uncontrolled diabetes is dangerous.
     
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  12. Brunneria

    Brunneria Other · Guru
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    It is the loss of sight that scares me the most, too.
    The thought of deterioration to the point of insulin, and being unable to do my own injections, or exert the same control over food that I do now...

    And @ickihun have a hug. I know the feeling of trying, and trying and not making progress on the weight thing. Now I prioritise bg control, and am battling insulin resistance via intermittent fasting (which is WORKING!!!) and the weight can take care of itself.
     
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  13. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    You need to bear in mind the population overall is increasing, the diabetic population is increasing, so it skews the figure by two factors. Also that statistic seems to be for amputations on patients that had diabetes, not just amputations due to diabetes, so all the non diabetic causes are included as well.

    If you consider that's 7000 out of 4 million, it's 0.175% due to all causes.
     
  14. catapillar

    catapillar Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Ok. But still, too many no? I stand by "sadly not as uncommon as we would all like it to be".
     
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  15. hankjam

    hankjam Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    ..... per week... when that actually commuted through to my noodle it went yikes.. thinking it might be a year... :(
     
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  16. SunnyExpat

    SunnyExpat Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    'The Amputee Coalition of America estimates that there are 185,000 new lower extremity amputations each year just within the United States and an estimated population of 2 million American amputees. It is projected that the amputee population will more than double by the year 2050 to 3.6 million.'

    That's a big number to me.

    The main cause are high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes, and inactivity.
    All cause arterial hardening, and cardiovascular disease.
     
    #36 SunnyExpat, Jun 21, 2016 at 1:42 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 21, 2016
  17. PenfoldAPD

    PenfoldAPD Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    As an aside if you do become an amputee, you live in England and you want the best prosthesis move to Scotland! Super high tech ones on the NHS up there, not available in England :( Or go live in Europe for 6 mths as a tax payer .. all standard issues in France and Germany.

    Not making a political statement :) just stating the facts ;)
     
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  18. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    Thanks @Contralto for reminding me of last years post.
    Ditto again for this year.
     
  19. ickihun

    ickihun Type 2 · Master

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    If you do move to Scotland I'm only down the road in Sunderland (near Newcastle). I'd love to see you.
    Or if you move to France I'll pop over now and again for a cheesy weekend?
    The worlds your oyster!
    PS. Brother-in-law got his Irish passport no problem. Might do same. We'll see.
     
    #39 ickihun, Jan 13, 2018 at 8:20 AM
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
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