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Any advice?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by pigdogboy, Feb 25, 2015.

  1. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    I'm a 38 yo man who has been being treated as a type 2 diabetic since my mid 20 ' s. Diet did nothing so started on the usual type 2 pills. Basically the pills didn't do a lot and my hba1c has always been high.
    Over the last 6 months, triggered by a change in doctor and a fasting blood glucose in the 30's I was put on insulin. I've been steadily increasing my dose and am now taking 60 odd units of a slow acting one (lantus). Now I weigh about 88 kg and I'm about 5 foot 8. So I'm carrying a bit of timber but not massively over weight but I'm a pretty active bloke too. So far the insulin hasn't been doing a lot. I still get 12 - 15 in the morning before breakfast although I've had a few in single figures once or twice. Since starting my hba1c has dropped a little from 95 to 77 but it's nowhere near expected.
    I have just had the results of a c peptide test which came back at 1089 . So apparently I still make healthy doses of my own insulin.
    Currently I'm waiting on an appointment with a consultant at the hospital.
    Obviously I'm a little worried and I'm just wondering if anyone else here has had a similar experience or any knowledge of what's going on with my body.
    Sorry for a long first post and feel free to move this if it's not in the right section.
    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. sally and james

    sally and james Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome, @pigdogboy
    You say, "diet did nothing", but what diet were you on? Was this the much discredited, but still handed out, "eat lots of carbs with every meal and avoid fats" diet? Tell us a bit more about this. Change of diet can sometimes work miracles. Many here have had huge success with "low carb high fat".
    Sally
     
  3. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    I started out living like a monk basically for the first 6 months. Very healthy stopped drinking and smoking. It actually got worse and that's when I was put on type 2 oral meds. Since then a pretty normal diet. I don't think diet is the issue.
     
  4. carraway

    carraway Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It would really help us if you could tell us a few of your typical daily meals
     
  5. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    Typical breakfast is porridge with dried fruit and nuts. Weekend would probably be a bacon sandwich on Saturday and a healthy fry up (if you know what I mean.?)
    Lunch is usually sandwiches a bag of crisps and a couple of pieces of fruit. Probably different on weekends again. Tea would be a normal family meal. Pasta. That sort of thing. Maybe a take away once a fortnight.
    This is now btw.
     
  6. NoCrbs4Me

    NoCrbs4Me I reversed my Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. The official "healthy" plate diet is 45 - 60% carbs and low in fat. Carbs turn into blood glucose. This is not healthy for a diabetic, hence the question regarding what your diet is. You diet does not actually sound very healthy. WAY too much carbs.
     
  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Hi pigdogboy.
    Welcome.

    On this forum we who have been through what you are going through.
    We recommend a lower carb diet.

    Your actually fuelling your blood glucose levels.

    Your healthy eating isn't healthy for a diabetic.

    Yes I've been there, read my blog.

    I'm tagging @daisy1 to give you all the new members information.

    Have a read around and have a look at the success stories on the forum.

    You've taken the first steps towards a better lifestyle.

    Keep posting.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  8. trinity0097

    trinity0097 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was recently diagnosed and have found the biggest change has been cutting out all carbs, I.e. No pasta, potato, bread, wheat etc and effectively only eating carbs in veg grown above ground. Sounds crazy but it really works!
     
  9. carraway

    carraway Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    All sounds like good food but pretty useless for a diabetic. Carbohydrates are far too high, dried fruit is sugar laden! Try taking your bloods before and after a high carb meal and then after a low carb meal and see the difference
     
  10. JTL

    JTL Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Pasta crisps bread!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    I'd be in hospital!
    Welcome aboard mate be prepared to have your understanding of food and diet turned on it's head!:wacky:
    When I first came across these people on here I couldn't believe the rubbish they were spouting.
    I'll stick with the professionals who know what they're talking about.
    The professionals were doing something wrong or was it just me.
    Thought I'd pop back here see how the lunatics were doing.
    The stuff I was reading and the links I was getting started to make a little sense .... only a little mind.
    I kept reading kept getting more sense out of it.
    Rejoined cos I couldn't remember my previous details and I'm so glad I did.
    BS under control.
    Weight down.
    Blood pressure down.
    Cholesterol looking good.
    Feeling so much better and so much in control.
    Not particularly difficult either ... has it's moments.
    You're journey has brought you here .... stop and take a look around.
    Say hello to some of the inmates.
    They let us out now and then if we behave but .... if anything is going to help your situation it's this place and the inmates here who are all on the same journey.
    Welcome.
    Am I rambling again .......:p:p:eek::dead:o_O:joyful:
     
    • Like Like x 8
  11. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. Yes, as others have said you ened to reduce the carbs. Insulin will do very little if your have excess weight as the body doesn't need even more insulin it just needs the ability to use it. Excess weight causes insulin resistance due to fat. So, I suspect you will be amazed at the results if you have a seriously low-carb diet. You should then be able to gradually reduce the insulin and your blood sugar will come down. I'm surprised you aren't taking Metformin which helps with insulin resistance. Do discuss this with the GP.
     
  12. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    The others are correct I'm afraid. Your diet may be healthy for a healthy individual, but it is far from healthy for a diabetic.
    Bread (as in your sandwiches), crisps, pasta, potatoes, rice, cereals (including porridge) are the main culprits because they are full of carbs. All carbs convert to glucose once in the system, and glucose is precisely what a diabetic does not want in his system. Cut those and your levels will drop. The more you cut, the lower your levels will be. We also need to be careful with fruit (and milk). Berries are OK in small amounts, maybe a small apple, but not much else. Your weekend fry up and your bacon are fine, so there is good news! A fry up of bacon, eggs, mushrooms and tomatoes is excellent. Dried fruit is worse than fresh fruit I'm afraid, but a few nuts are fine. It sounds to me as though you have been given some poor dietary advice by your health care team.

    Have a good read round the forum and come back with any questions. We all want to help.
     
  13. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    I have tried a low carb hi protein diet. Bacon and eggs. Steak and salad all the time. No weight loss or improvement in blood sugar levels. And it was getting costly! I have noticed the diet forums and will have a look for some ideas there.
    I'm an active bloke. On my feet all day at work, most days over 20000 paces on the pedometer. I do martial arts at least twice a week. I've taken up jogging recently too. Long walks with the dog.
    I'm not some obese couch potato!
    Yeah I'm still on metformin. 4 tablets a day along with the other stuff that is used to treat type 2. Glucophage is one other. As well as 60 odd units of lantus.
     
  14. trinity0097

    trinity0097 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Try low carb and high fat
     
  15. daisy1

    daisy1 Type 2 · Legend
    Retired Moderator

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    @pigdogboy

    Hello and welcome to the forum :)

    As others have already said above with some very good advice, you need to look seriously at your diet and reduce the carbohydrates you are eating. Here is the information we give to new members and in particular the diet related parts, especially with regards to carbs, will be helpful to you. Ask as many questions as you want to and someone will be able to answer.


    BASIC INFORMATION FOR NEW MEMBERS

    Diabetes is the general term to describe people who have blood that is sweeter than normal. A number of different types of diabetes exist.

    A diagnosis of diabetes tends to be a big shock for most of us. It’s far from the end of the world though and on this forum you’ll find over 130,000 people who are demonstrating this.

    On the forum we have found that with the number of new people being diagnosed with diabetes each day, sometimes the NHS is not being able to give all the advice it would perhaps like to deliver - particularly with regards to people with type 2 diabetes.

    The role of carbohydrate

    Carbohydrates are a factor in diabetes because they ultimately break down into sugar (glucose) within our blood. We then need enough insulin to either convert the blood sugar into energy for our body, or to store the blood sugar as body fat.

    If the amount of carbohydrate we take in is more than our body’s own (or injected) insulin can cope with, then our blood sugar will rise.

    The bad news

    Research indicates that raised blood sugar levels over a period of years can lead to organ damage, commonly referred to as diabetic complications.

    The good news

    People on the forum here have shown that there is plenty of opportunity to keep blood sugar levels from going too high. It’s a daily task but it’s within our reach and it’s well worth the effort.

    Controlling your carbs

    The info below is primarily aimed at people with type 2 diabetes, however, it may also be of benefit for other types of diabetes as well.
    There are two approaches to controlling your carbs:

    • Reduce your carbohydrate intake
    • Choose ‘better’ carbohydrates

    Reduce your carbohydrates

    A large number of people on this forum have chosen to reduce the amount of carbohydrates they eat as they have found this to be an effective way of improving (lowering) their blood sugar levels.

    The carbohydrates which tend to have the most pronounced effect on blood sugar levels tend to be starchy carbohydrates such as rice, pasta, bread, potatoes and similar root vegetables, flour based products (pastry, cakes, biscuits, battered food etc) and certain fruits.

    Choosing better carbohydrates

    Another option is to replace ‘white carbohydrates’ (such as white bread, white rice, white flour etc) with whole grain varieties. The idea behind having whole grain varieties is that the carbohydrates get broken down slower than the white varieties –and these are said to have a lower glycaemic index.
    http://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/diabetes-and-whole-grains.html

    The low glycaemic index diet is often favoured by healthcare professionals but some people with diabetes find that low GI does not help their blood sugar enough and may wish to cut out these foods altogether.

    Read more on carbohydrates and diabetes

    Eating what works for you

    Different people respond differently to different types of food. What works for one person may not work so well for another. The best way to see which foods are working for you is to test your blood sugar with a glucose meter.

    To be able to see what effect a particular type of food or meal has on your blood sugar is to do a test before the meal and then test after the meal. A test 2 hours after the meal gives a good idea of how your body has reacted to the meal.

    The blood sugar ranges recommended by NICE are as follows:

    Blood glucose ranges for type 2 diabetes
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 8.5 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (adults)
    • Before meals: 4 to 7 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 9 mmol/l
    Blood glucose ranges for type 1 diabetes (children)
    • Before meals: 4 to 8 mmol/l
    • 2 hours after meals: under 10 mmol/l
    However, those that are able to, may wish to keep blood sugar levels below the NICE after meal targets.

    Access to blood glucose test strips

    The NICE guidelines suggest that people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes should be offered:

    • structured education to every person and/or their carer at and around the time of diagnosis, with annual reinforcement and review
    • self-monitoring of plasma glucose to a person newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes only as an integral part of his or her self-management education

    Therefore both structured education and self-monitoring of blood glucose should be offered to people with type 2 diabetes. Read more on getting access to bloodglucose testing supplies.

    You may also be interested to read questions to ask at a diabetic clinic

    Note: This post has been edited from Sue/Ken's post to include up to date information.
     
  16. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    Thanks for all your comments so far.
    I've been dealing with diabetes for over 10 years now. I say dealing rather than coping because in all that time I've never had low blood sugar or hba1c reading and constantly have hyperglycemic symptoms. I've tried various diets with little or no effect. Oral medication was ineffective too.
    Now I'm taking bucket loads of insulin and have just been told That I make healthy levels of my own.
    I know what should be happening and what I should be doing, but it's all very confusing at this moment in time.
     
  17. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    Oh. So is my diabetic nurse and I've got a while to wait to see a consultant. ...
     
  18. Daibell

    Daibell LADA · Master

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    Hi. It's possible you have some rarer condtion or type of diabetes that doesn't follow the ususal rules. I am very surprised that a low carb diet didn't work; theoretically it should. Yes, increase the fat in preference to protein although either should be OK. Can you let us know a typical full day meal pattern when on low-carbs to see if we can spot anything? My son has lost 7 stone from 19 stone over the last 6 months thru low-carbing and he has a slow metabolism.
     
  19. pigdogboy

    pigdogboy Type 2 · Member

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    When I was do it the low carb thing a typical breakfast was bacon and eggs. Sometimes just boiled eggs. Lunch would be like a frying steak and salad. Maybe sausages and eggs again. Evening meal would be a bigger steak and salad . Chicken breastfeeding and salad. Or like spaghetti bol without the spaghetti and salad. Basically a lot of meat. A lot 9fafer salad. No bread or stuff.
    My weight seems to stay pretty constant around the 90 kg mark. Whatever I'm doing.
     
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