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Any diabetics work in the fitness industry?

Discussion in 'Fitness, Exercise and Sport' started by purplekat, Aug 14, 2014.

  1. purplekat

    purplekat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I was wondering if any diabetics (T1 or T2) work as fitness instructors, either part time or full time?

    I'm still trying to get into the habit of regular exercise (I enjoy it, just lack motivation to do it around work), and was wondering how feasible it would be to be diabetic and either work as a fitness trainer or take classes (either fitness or dance) as a way of keeping active on a daily basis. I doubt I'd be trying for full time hours, however the idea of being qualified to teach something, and running a few evening classes a week does quite appeal.

    I'd imagine it would be possible, especially on a part time basis, but would love to hear from any people who are currently doing it - benefits, drawbacks etc
     
  2. ElyDave

    ElyDave Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I would love this as second career, actually specialising as a personal/group trainer for those with diabetes, but also incorporating diabetes management, diet and nutrition, injury prevention, sports psychology etc.

    I'm sure the opportunities are there and there shouldn't be any barriers.

    There's at least one full time dancer on here - maybe a student, I'm not sure.
     
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  3. Bebo321

    Bebo321 Family member · Well-Known Member

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    Hi there purplekat,
    We know someone through TeamBG who is a personal trainer for the NHS - advises on exercises for people with disabilities or injuries. She completed an ironman just a couple of months back and is doing a stage of the mHealth Grand Tour. She has Type 1 diabetes.
    In answer to your question, yes absolutely it is possible - it's just a case of learning about how best to manage BG levels whilst you do so.
    Why not join the 'Sporty diabetic type 1's' Facebook group and ask the question. Absolutely no reason why you couldn't teach as T2 either.
    We would be interested to hear how you get on - if there is anything you think we could help you with, please do get in touch and we will do all we can.
    www.teambloodglucose.com:)
     
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  4. purplekat

    purplekat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    That's encouraging to hear, it's something I'll investigate further. First to find what I would enjoy teaching the most! Thanks guys :)
     
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  5. jules65

    jules65 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I would not be able to work full time, but I teach yoga, 5 x 90 minute classes a week, and have a couple of regular one-to-one clients most weeks. I feel like I have the best job in the world. :)
     
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  6. gymJunki3

    gymJunki3 Type 2 · Newbie

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    Hey purplekat. You can be a diabetic and still take classes or be a fitness trainer. I have DM2 and I am into body building and fitness. I workout 6 days a week, alternating high intensity interval running and weight lifting. For my recovery day, I train for boxing.

    But remember:
    1. Before you start with any program you really have to find out how your body responds to the workout. Monitor your blood sugar before, during and after the workout. Same thing applies when you change programs.
    2. Always bring a glucose pill, non-diet soda or a bar of chocolate with you to the gym (I always bring my emergency chocolate bar during training, I only got it use it once and I hope never to use it again!)
    3. Let you trainer/instructor know you are diabetic.
    4. Eat right to nourish your body. Working out still doesn't give us the license to binge on carbs.

    These are people who inspired me:
    Gary Hall – swimmer, Olympic Medalist
    Vinnie Santana - Professional Triathlete and trainer
    Ginger Vieira's - Personal trainer, yoga instructor, motivational fitness and diabetes coach, professional power lifter and diabetic

    Let me know how it goes for you.
    Goodluck!
     
  7. Baruney

    Baruney Type 2 · BANNED

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    There certainly a huge gap in the market!
     
  8. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Given the number of us who are keen sports people (I'm a keen cyclist and have undertaken a number of long distance cycling holidays and am also currently undertaking "body recomposition" through weight training), we are all proof that being diabetic is no blocker to just getting on and doing it. Sure, you need to be aware of how it affects your glucose levels, but starting a little bit higher and taking dextrosol tablets in with you and I'm sure you'll be fine!
     
  9. purplekat

    purplekat Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies, definitely encouraging to hear! As life has now settled down a bit (hectic few months, and unable to get online much either), I need to start trying out different activities and see what suits me :)
     
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  10. Kelsie

    Kelsie · Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I am a gym instructor and sports therapist and my job is v active 5-6 days a week. If anything it is a massive help to my diabetes management as I am v v insulin sensitive as a result of my job! I am now on a pump due to many hypos and the pens not doing small enough units for me but I would thoroughly recommend it :) I am on my feet pretty much from 9am-8pm with classes in between that, rehab programmes, sports massages and doing my own training-I love my job! It's tiring, very tiring but I would not swap it for a desk job at all. If your uk based, I would recommend Lifetime for doing your gym instructing qualification with
     
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