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Are our lives set to change ?!

Discussion in 'Diabetes Discussions' started by Jonnyjibbsuk, Jun 24, 2015.

  1. ewelina

    ewelina Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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  2. catherinecherub

    catherinecherub · Guest

  3. Engineer88

    Engineer88 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    no time soon. I don't like the sound of it honestly, no variability no pro active approach to releasing insulin only reactive. sounds like a recipe for trouble.
     
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  4. Scardoc

    Scardoc · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds interesting although I'd say that this kind of technology may have the potential to become an implant as opposed to a patch.
     
  5. graj0

    graj0 · Guest

    Great news so long as it can delivery precise doses otherwise it will go the same way as oral insulin delivery system ten years ago. Still could be a few years off.
     
  6. Scimama

    Scimama Type 2 (in remission!) · Well-Known Member

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    Lets hope the researchers get the funding they need to pursue this further
     
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  7. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    I will ask Mr T, at my diabetes clinic appointment this afternoon and see what he says :rolleyes: But must try to remember to ask :wideyed:
     
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  8. shaggy1974

    shaggy1974 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Sounds promising but I really wish these researchers would look at trying to find a cure rather than looking at how the insulin is administered.

    Also, is anyone else slightly annoyed by journalists who keep coming out with the "painful injection" stuff. First of all, they aren't painful and of all the things that bother me about diabetes injecting certainly isn't one of them
     
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  9. RuthW

    RuthW Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I really can't see how this can work well. I mean currently we inject BEFORE eating, sometimes well before, to prevent a spike. How can a patch which reacts to your peripheral blood sugar anticipate a spike? Seems crazy to me.
     
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  10. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    Different groups of researchers is the answer to question number one.

    That's my biggest gripe about the whole article. The comment about painful injections. Colloquially, journalists, STFU!
     
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  11. Robinredbreast

    Robinredbreast Type 1 · Oracle

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    Hi, I couldn't ask Mr T as he was unwell, so met with another who came up from Winchester. I said over the decades we keep hearing of a 'possible cure' in 5 years time or 10 years and still nothing, so is there actually something in the pipe line? The answer was, no really, he talked of the artificial pancreas( still like a pump) and the possible malfunction of such a device, because if it did happen it could be very serious ( giving too much Insulin).Testing in people who could be at risk of type 1, but then I asked how would they know who to test, he said a number could be tested, but would come up with no findings.
    So nothing to report back I'm afraid.
     
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  12. tim2000s

    tim2000s Type 1 · Expert
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    If you take a look at the research websites from various hospitals that are undertaking research, many of them are working with recently diagnosed T1s to try and determine causes and potential solutions. It's always difficult as it's almost impossible to identify a T1 until they are undergoing the auto-immune attack, so working with the newly diagnosed is the next best option.

    Guys and St Thomas' list of current research is here (note that this is part of the Kings College Diabetes Research group, along with Denmark Hill): http://www.guysandstthomas.nhs.uk/research/studies/diabetes.aspx

    Interestingly, they've now picked up on the "Low Calorie Diet" so it seems word of this is spreading. The BUDiE study is also good to complete if you are local. There are a couple of studies relating to newly diagnosed so it is worth getting in touch on those if you are interested in participating.
     
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    #13 tim2000s, Jun 25, 2015 at 9:39 AM
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 25, 2015
  13. Martin153

    Martin153 Type 1 · Member

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    Blimey, generally I inject after eating. I was told back in 1984 to inject 10 minutes before eating.
    I'm convinced this is dangerous as now & then insulin gets to work too quick & sugar level can plummet before any food is digested. I would only inject before if I know sugar levels are high.
    If I'm out for a meal then I inject part way in to the meal as it may be up to an hour before I finish so then I agree, a spike would happen.
    If you read the article it does say this patch emulates beta cells so it does sound good to me.
    It would put insulin in when required basically.
    Any system that could do this would almost certainly do it better than the way I've been doing it for over 31 years!
     
  14. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Whatever works for the individual Martin, QA insulin take around 15 mins to work from injecting and that is why some of us inject ahead of our food to reduce the postprandial spikes, but if you find your insulin works too fast and need to inject afterwards then that's fine, there's no wrong or right way and its all based on our own individual experiences.
     
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  15. Martin153

    Martin153 Type 1 · Member

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    Fair point.
    But have you ever hit a vein by mistake? Surely the insulin will be straight in the blood stream & acting quick?
    That's what I'm saying. Maybe 100 times injecting before a meal then this is fine, but just on that odd occasion the insulin gets in the blood stream quick, then sugar levels can dip quick.
    Just for that reason I'll do it after the meal.
     
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