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Arrested for drunk and disorderly

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by s10vsb, Apr 23, 2013.

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  1. Yorksman

    Yorksman Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Good lawyers get rich soccer players off all the time on procedural issues :) Where did I put my copy of Stone's Justices' Manual?
     
  2. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy · Well-Known Member

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  3. s10vsb

    s10vsb · Well-Known Member

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    Believe me 'Mr Happy', I am one the best to represent 'us'. :thumbup:
     
  4. Finzi

    Finzi · Well-Known Member

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    And I'm going to chime in as another voice sticking up for AMBrennan ( and to an extent the OP)

    All she was asking for was that her BM should have been checked before she was locked up and her vital supplies taken away. Yes, I can see why they do that, although it seems a little paranoid to me to be honest. But they should NOT do it before ensuring her BM was ok and continuing to check it regularly through the night. She does sound like she over-reacted and that wouldn't have endeared her to the police, who are human after all, but it is their job to put that aside and do what is in her interest to keep her safe. And while I'm sure she was not entirely blameless in her arrest, it is not uncommon for police to "back themselves into a corner" and end up having to arrest someone so as not to lose face (again - they are human. Understandable. They deal with some pretty sh*tty people day in day out).

    I'm not really sure why the OP is getting such a hard time here, to be honest. Em says that her behaviour couldn't have been thought to be hypo related because "we do" xyz when we are hypo. Well, everybody is different. I can assure you that I've seen plenty of people with hypos who behave in all sorts of different ways, including "like a person possessed". I am quite shocked that a police officer would take so long to ensure that a diabetic's blood was tested when they were behaving like that. And as for "diabetes doesn't kill you", no, not instantly that second, but the OP had no way of knowing how "neglected" she was likely to be. From her point of view, they'd taken away her monitor, her insulin, her dextrose, had not told her how long that situation might continue for, and weren't doing the vital step of checking her BM.

    For the OP: word of warning in future. NEVER antagonize or p*ss off the police. It just isn't worth it. Most likely, if you'd asked nicely, or done what they'd said in the first place, none if this would have happened.


    Type 2 on Metformin, diagnosed Jan 2013, ultra low carber, Hba1C at diagnosis 8% (11mmol), now between 5 and 6 mmol. 13kg lost so far :)
     
  5. Finzi

    Finzi · Well-Known Member

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    And I'm going to chime in as another voice sticking up for AMBrennan ( and to an extent the OP)

    All she was asking for was that her BM should have been checked before she was locked up and her vital supplies taken away. Yes, I can see why they do that, although it seems a little paranoid to me to be honest. But they should NOT do it before ensuring her BM was ok and continuing to check it regularly through the night. She does sound like she over-reacted and that wouldn't have endeared her to the police, who are human after all, but it is their job to put that aside and do what is in her interest to keep her safe. And while I'm sure she was not entirely blameless in her arrest, it is not uncommon for police to "back themselves into a corner" and end up having to arrest someone so as not to lose face (again - they are human. Understandable. They deal with some pretty sh*tty people day in day out).

    I'm not really sure why the OP is getting such a hard time here, to be honest. Em says that her behaviour couldn't have been thought to be hypo related because "we do" xyz when we are hypo. Well, everybody is different. I can assure you that I've seen plenty of people with hypos who behave in all sorts of different ways, including "like a person possessed". I am quite shocked that a police officer would take so long to ensure that a diabetic's blood was tested when they were behaving like that. And as for "diabetes doesn't kill you", no, not instantly that second, but the OP had no way of knowing how "neglected" she was likely to be. From her point of view, they'd taken away her monitor, her insulin, her dextrose, had not told her how long that situation might continue for, and weren't doing the vital step of checking her BM.

    For the OP: word of warning in future. NEVER antagonize or p*ss off the police. It just isn't worth it. Most likely, if you'd asked nicely, or done what they'd said in the first place, none if this would have happened.


    Type 2 on Metformin, diagnosed Jan 2013, ultra low carber, Hba1C at diagnosis 8% (11mmol), now between 5 and 6 mmol. 13kg lost so far :)
     
  6. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    She was arrested for being "drunk and disorderly". She was also screaming and banging on cell door. Would you have liked to have taken her blood glucose levels ? I certainly wouldn't.
    The police let her calm down, and a doctor arrived. Then she was tested.
    The police even went to her house and got her correct insulin, which she refused.
    Yes, the police have a duty of care, but they also need to risk assess. There are many people here making assumptions but the only voice we haven't heard is the police present. That's why it's easy to blame them. There was a reason she was arrested. The Sergeant may have took the decision not to test straight away so as not to put an officer, or OP at risk.
    Ultimately, we'll just have to wait and see what the outcome of the complaint, if any, will be.
    I suspect the police will be not guilty of any wrong doing.
    I stand to be corrected.


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  7. LizG

    LizG Parent · Active Member

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    The OP is probably out having a drink and reading all these posts about his/her shenanigans!


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  8. izzzi

    izzzi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Somehow I just can't see this OP understanding that her representment In Diabetes care from our Police Service is a lost cause.

    Roy :)
     
  9. JConnor

    JConnor Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    But the point is she should NOT have been put in the cell till her BM's had been checked, if they had done that first then she wouldn't of been banging on the cell for her dextrose because she would of known where she stood with BM levels.


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  10. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy · Well-Known Member

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    Is the point not that she should have done as the police asked her in the first place.

    I do not want the diabetic masses represented by the idiotic minoroty.

    In the future you may wish to:

    Not get so slaughtered you lose self control
    Not annoy your friends to the degree that they leave you
    Listen to the police
    Wear appropriate footwear
    Not paint on restrictive clothing (neither functional nor attractive)
    Not shout abuse at the police
    Have better control of your sugars
    Have the appropriate equipment with you
    Have some respect
    Have some humility


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  11. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Rapidly getting P'ed off with the sanctimonious ones on here!
    Yes, the OP should have ensured that she had al her kit, and not been drinking to excess.
    However we expect a "duty of care" to be exercised by police (and others in authority), and this is what I am concerned about.
     
  12. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy · Well-Known Member

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    Fergus, indeed it is concerning, if true.

    The issue i have is believing the story of someone behaving drunk, disorderly and agressively. In fact, behaving in a way in which she was clearly putting her own health at risk.

    As suggested, some humility would help. I'm sure a post stating "i was a complete muppet, got drunk and arrested, but have concerns over the way the police handle people with diabetes" would have been received quite differently.

    I am fed up with people who want to shift the blame for their own disgusting behaviour!

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  13. izzzi

    izzzi Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    FergusCrawford, your Avatar is brilliant "dare not offer you a bg test dressed like that." You are so correct when it comes to "Duty of Care" and it is a worry for all.

    I just feel that in this occasion we do not know the truth to how the police actually dealt with this person.
    Yes I am a little sanctimonious,but I do get P,ed off with a self confessed drunk person trying to be a "goody two shoes"
    People that get mistreated must inform the authorities,(it should also be noted in many cases they are to afraid).
    In this instance it is completely different, if fact it could be reversed to the police being mistreated.

    Roy, :)
     
  14. mo1905

    mo1905 Type 1 · BANNED

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    Depends how "drunk and disorderly" she was ! We'll never know. We weren't there and our only "witness" was drunk ;-)


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  15. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  16. CollieBoy

    CollieBoy Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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  17. Mr Happy

    Mr Happy · Well-Known Member

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    True. Not sure which i dislkie more, 'modern' or 'society'

    ;-)



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  18. s10vsb

    s10vsb · Well-Known Member

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    had my meeting with the Sergeant yesterday. He agreed I should've been allowed a phone call and things could've been handled differently as I was not abusive or aggressive to the police at any time. He has seen all of the CCTV footage and my complaint about my treatment in custody by one of the officers when I was like 'a woman possessed' in the cell has been taken seriously and they are getting a warning and their conduct will now be monitered. We spent over half an hour discussing diabetes. He now knows why we take insulin, what a hypo and hyper is and what causes them, some of the symptoms, (as we are all different) and how they can be resolved by either insulin or sugar. He completely understands why I reacted like I did in the cell without knowing what my BS was or have access to dextrose or insulin and why I refused to take my insulin as they wouldn't tell me how long I would be detained for and could potentially had a hypo. I showed him my 'Optimum Xceed' and the users guide and how just 2 spots of blood from the finger can determine a hypo and keytones that could both potentially lead to death if not treated. I showed him the web page and they cost £15 but are free to diabetics on prescription. He wrote the web site down and is going to take if further because he agrees that diabetics should have better treatment in custody and a monitor is all it takes. He's going to speak to his superiors about it and get the ball rolling!! RESULT!!! :thumbup: I said he might even get the monitors free because at the end of the day, they are for use by diabetics after all.
    When he was leaving I said I'm gonna fight this all the way and if they don't get monitors I would like a meeting with the Chief Inspector for him to justify why. I also said that as Durham was one of the top 3 police forces in England, if they got monitors and went on 'look North' news to say why they now have them due to the amount of wasted time and money by just getting Drs to take BS alone and the stress caused to diabetics in custody, it might even start the ball rolling for the rest of the UK to follow.
     
  19. s10vsb

    s10vsb · Well-Known Member

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  20. s10vsb

    s10vsb · Well-Known Member

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