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Bizarre experience

Discussion in 'Type 1 Diabetes' started by kegstore, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    OK, so I was awoken at 4.30 this morning by my pump alarm going off, bleating with a bg of around 3. I remember walking downstairs and performing a meter test which came back as 2.2. Instead of going to the fridge for sustenance, I went straight back to bed! I felt completely fine throughout but must have been in a confused state, as I remember having problems emptying my lancing device. However I was able to do the test and acknowledge the result, just incapable of anything else - no motivation to resolve the problem.

    I'm stunned that my bg at 9.30 was "only" 9.9 which I've been able to correct for, normally after an experience like this I'd be going skywards and already in the mid-teens. What perturbs me is my distinct recollection of what happened, strangely lucid and accurate in detail, as disastrous hypos in the past have fortunately (?) been accompanied by total amnesia of the event. Very odd indeed.
     
  2. sugarless sue

    sugarless sue · Master

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    Possibly 'only' went to 9.9 because you did not eat but must have 'dumped' to correct it.
     
  3. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    I think you're right Sue. Thankfully back at 5.9 now, which again is an unusually quick stabilisation - in terms of both level and time. I'm beginning to form another theory about bad hypos and the extent of liver reaction, as I never get to treat such events myself. This is down to having CGM, a gift I continue to be thankful for on a daily basis:

    Last night's incident was a result of quite a slow reduction in blood sugar over several hours. Whenever I've had a bad hypo after plummeting levels over a shorter period, the subsequent rise in bg levels is much quicker and more severe, a definite knee-jerk reaction.

    Makes sense I suppose, and more proof of an existing theory rather than a new one I guess! Also good to be woken by the pump alarm for a change, which doesn't always succeed in it's efforts to raise me...
     
  4. copepod

    copepod Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Shows the importance of having food within reach of bed, so you don't have to go to kitchen to eat if you wake hypoglycaemic, potentially falling down stairs on the way.
     
  5. jonesy

    jonesy · Well-Known Member

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    kegstore....i am very new to all this. my son has recently been diagnosed type 1.
    you mention your alarm going off. do insulin pumps constantly measure BG?
     
  6. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    Indeed, which is why I have a mini fridge containing all sorts of goodies next to my bed, that I totally ignored! Another "feature" of being hypo unaware, sadly... <sigh>

    Some do, in a roundabout sort of way, but not always completely accurately. Google "cgms diabetes" for further info or check out the Insulin Pump Forum on this site.
     
  7. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Kegstore,

    AS Sue says, thankfully you had a 'liver dump' to correct your bg.


    Last night 1 hour after my evening meal, I tested and was 7.9. I then took dog for walk as I do each evening, came back 1 hour later and felt hypo, so tested and was 2.7. Now not so long ago, I would have had 3-4 biscuits and a slice of toast to correct, but lately, and last night I had 1 rich tea biscuit and a apple. After a hour I tested and was 5.2, had a couple of rye crackers with cheese for supper with 4 units of insulin, tested getting into bed 6.8, woke this morning 5.2.

    When I previousely ate biscuits and toast, I could be certain that 1-2 hours later would be 10+, but if I ate any less when hypo it would not correct itself. However, since reducing my carbs intake, I can get away with a small biscuit and a apple, and feel confident that it is sufficient to bring my bg back to normal, without spiking hours later.

    I once went hypo when I was about 20 years old, woke up and went downstairs and my mother had made me some scrambled egg on toast. Being confused, I injected quick acting insulin and sat down to eat, must have started to drift off and the plate slipped and scrabled egg fell on my bare legs. As this had just come out the pan, it burnt my leg and the pain shocked me into coming round and I then had some milk and biscuits. Thankfully, this was the last time I have lost control during a hypo.

    Kegstore, it can be a frightening experience, and I hope it is your last time. The alarm on your pump sounds a great little device, my night-time hypo alarm is my bladder, always desperately need the loo when I wake up low! :?

    Nigel
     
  8. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

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    I doubt very much it'll be my last, but I've certainly managed to reduce their frequency. :)

    I've heard it said that the mind protects us from the recollection of disturbing events - since 2003 I've had 2 RTAs due to hypos and years later still have no memory of what happened before and during each one. You'll be glad to hear I no longer drive!
     
  9. noblehead

    noblehead Type 1 · Guru
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    Hi again Kegstore,

    Of course it wont be your last hypo, what I meant was your inability to act to resolve your hypo at the time.

    Regards

    Nigel
     
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