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Blood glucose monitor experiment - any insight welcomed

Discussion in 'Prediabetes' started by clare1_2_3, Jul 10, 2020.

  1. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    Hello all, hope you are keeping well.

    I posted last year about being concerned about pre diabetes/glucose intolerance/insulin resistance as I have PCOS, and my Mum was diagnosed T2 last year. I haven't yet gone low carb, and was hoping for a referral to hospital for an OGTT, but due to Covid this may be a while yet.

    So I bought myself a Gluco Navii glucose monitor and today have tried a rough version of the test at the link below. I say a rough version as the bread I had was only 34.5g carbs in two slices so I whacked some jam on it to make it a bit higher. I'm not sure on reflection if that was a good idea. Anyway...results are below....any thoughts?

    https://www.bloodsugar101.com/am-i-diabetic

    9.15 am 5.0 (fasted)
    10.20 am 7.0 (1hr post carb meal)
    11.20 am 7.5 (2hr post carb meal)
    12.20 pm 6.0 (3hr post carb meal)

    Clare
     
  2. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    Jist ran a final one as not yet eaten lunch

    13.10 (almost 4 hours post meal) 5.5
     
  3. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Really hard to say using the test by this method as it’s quite different to a OGTT and how many carbs the jam had etc etc. Some people are more sensitive to certain types of carbs too. They look normal Ish to high normal Ish to me. So I don’t think you need to panic as there’s nothing horrific going on but it is probably worth getting a proper test when you get the chance. In the meantime why not ease off carbs and any processed foods a little, maybe move a little more if that’s practical etc. It’s never a bad thing and might just head a potential problem off. If it turns out you are prediabetic then it’s what you’ll end up doing anyway and it might well help the pcos too
     
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  4. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    Thanks that's helpful. I'm going to follow up whether OGTT is now able to be referred as I'd love to have a clear answer either way.

    I do move plenty - I run, horse ride and am just back to open water swimming after a Covid delay to the season. You would think I would be super fit but I'm sadly still obese at BMI 31ish. I'd love to reduce even 1 stone but it doesn't want to shift.

    Diet wise, carbohydrates are just all over the place in the standard British way of eating and I'm finding it harder to change on that front. I feel I need a scientific answer as to whether I need to change which I know is probably just a delaying/procrastination thing in my head!
     
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  5. lucylocket61

    lucylocket61 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Obesity is a symptom, not a cause, of type 2 for many of us. It can be an early warning of insulin resistance. I second the idea of lowering your carbs anyway, and seeing what happens.
     
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  6. HSSS

    HSSS Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    In the U.K. you’re more likely to be given an hb1ac now than a OGTT.

    Yes carbs are everywhere. But if you have pcos and struggle to shift weight you are likely to have a degree of insulin resistance right now. Waiting to address this will leave those issues unaddressed and possible add in diabetes at some stage down the line as insulin resistance rarely improves without dietary change. So sorry but yes I think you are procrastinating on beneficial changes. They do take some getting your head around and they are tricky to negotiate til you get used to it. But it does become normal after a while and your desire to be riding the carb craving, insulin increasing rollercoaster really does lessen significantly. please have a read of the nutritional thingy I linked to above.

    lots of evidence about about why lower carb is scientifically beneficial if you look into it.
     
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  7. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    I just read it, really helpful thank you.

    I think a kick up the backside is what I need to be honest, so, thanks!

    I've got a week off work next week I think I'll spend an hour a day or so doing some reading and planning menus. There's just me and my other half, but think he will still be wanting some carbs so I'll try and plan that in I was also a pescatarian until late last year when I started to eat chicken and turkey. Having read the carb content of veggie protein sources I think I may need to branch out to other meats too.
     
  8. In Response

    In Response · Well-Known Member

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    I wanted to add a comment about the "2 hours after eating" reading which seems to be quoted like a religion.
    My understanding is that 2 hours is a convenient guide whilst the time of the peak after eating carbs depends on what you have eaten.
    Those with type 1 are very aware of this because they eat fast acting cabs to resolve hypos because they peak within 10 to 15 minutes. Whereas, high fat meals such as curry and pizza can peak 4 or 5 hours later.
    I understand that testing 2 hours after eating is convenient but it is another thing where I think you should be looking for trends rather than worrying because one meal showed more than 2mmol/l difference after 2 hours whereas another was fine.
    Those of us lucky enough to have a CGM or Libre, are able to see these peaks. But without this luxury, I guess finger pricking 2 hours is a good compromise. As long as you know it is a compromise.
     
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  9. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Can you tell us why you want an OGTT ? These are very rarely done in the UK apart from on pregnant women and those with Reactive Hypoglycemia etc. An HbA1c will give you a much better idea of how you stand, and unless you are pregnant it is highly unlikely you will get an OGTT. If you are concerned, then I suggest you arrange with your GP to have an HbA1c.

    Home OGTT's can be done successfully, but you need to buy a bottle of pure glucose drink made for this purpose. Rapilose is one such product. You also need to download the information sheet and instructions etc. telling you how to prepare for the test. Then you need to test fasting and every 15 or 30 minutes after the drink for 2 and probably 3 hours at least without moving from your chair. Trying to replicate this glucose with carby foods is almost impossible because foods such as bread contain fats and protein along with carbs. Also, was there butter on your bread? That would also have affected things.
     
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  10. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    It's recommended in the NICE guidelines for PCOS, as insulin resistance/leasing to T2 are known complications.

    https://cks.nice.org.uk/polycystic-ovary-syndrome#!scenarioRecommendation:1

    In addition my Mum finally got diagnosed T2 last year. She had been told she was intolerant to glucose 20 years previous. She had an annual HBA1C but even though that always came back OK, until last year, she has meanwhile developed nerve damage to her feet and is having a lot of trouble with them. So forgive me for not trusting HBA1C. That being said, mine was 38 last year.
     
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  11. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Thanks for that information. I understand.
     
  12. andromache

    andromache · Well-Known Member

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    In your shoes, I think I would take the 'no regrets' policy. By that I would mean never mind the numbers: just cut out the sugar and processed carbs and vegetable seed oils for a few months and see how you feel. Better? Worse? That will be far more valuable information for you. How well you feel is the gold standard, not some snapshot numerical approximation of one single aspect of your health.
     
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  13. andromache

    andromache · Well-Known Member

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    You mother's experience is not unusual. People can keep on having OK (ish) HbA1c results for years, all the while getting more and more metabolically unwell as the pancreas pumps out more and more insulin to hold the blood sugar under control. Then the exhausted pancreas loses the fight quite suddenly and voila - T2D. Please don't let this happen to you.
     
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  14. Alexandra100

    Alexandra100 Prefer not to say · Well-Known Member

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    The WHO recognises 2 other diagnostic tests for pre-diabetes beside the OGTT. One is the A1c test, which is usually done alongside other tests eg for cholesterol, kidney function etc when you are having blood taken anyway. An A1c of 42 mmol/L is considered the starting point for pre-diabetes. Could it be that you have already had this test and no-one has told you the result? There is also the finger prick test done after fasting overnight in the usual way. Now you have bought your meter (great self-empowerment choice) you can do this yourself. I do it every morning before consuming anything except water and record the results (on a month to a view calendar downloaded free from the internet) so as to see any trends. This record is also useful to show to my GP. 5.6mmol/L is considered pre-diabetic.

    As to diet, I agree with all the people who have already praised the lower-carb approach. I do believe that much of the food we are encouraged to eat these days is far too high in carbs, and many people eating that diet are hurtling unknowingly towards a horrid diabetic surprise. Great that your suspicions have been aroused in time to take (moderate) action in good time.
     
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  15. LakeTahoeBob

    LakeTahoeBob Prediabetes · Member

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    There is much information that suggests that exercise is not the answer to reducing obesity. I was very active for 20 years and still had BMI over 30. Low fat diets always led to weight loss and then weight gain. For me (and for many others) low carb/high fat has worked well. Lost 67 pounds and attained BMI of 24. Recommend you consider LC/HF. Good Luck.
     
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  16. clare1_2_3

    clare1_2_3 Other · Member

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    Amazing, well done. I don't think my BMI has been below 25 since I was about 20 years old (now 39). I have too much history with low fat diets mainly WW and Rosemary Conley. They definitely don't work long term for me, I'll say that much!
     
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