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Blood glucose monitoring.

Discussion in 'Reactive Hypoglycemia' started by Lamont D, Nov 23, 2015.

  1. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I recently replied to a question on why we use a monitor to check our blood glucose levels.
    So I thought that using my experience in finger pricking to see how I'm doing, and I'm doing really well. To give you a personal opinion on how to do this really important task with details.
    The main reason is to give someone who has or could have RH the tools to help them get their heads around what to do and what to look out for.

    In my first year since diagnosis and getting control and obviously getting myself into good health and fitness, I had to test depending on how many meals I had and if I hadn't tested the food or combination of foods to see if I could comfortably eat them without spiking.
    I believe that anything that spikes us is a non starter first and foremost. We don't want anything that triggers a spike then a hypo.
    It also depends on how quickly we spike and how long we can be able to not eat without going into hypo hell.
    So on that basis, this is how I dealt with testing.
    Most testing will revolve around meals and like me I can eat something between six to nine meals a day. Depending on when my first meal is and obviously my last.
    Also and bear in mind of how much you do eat daily and especially if you want to lose weight, how a little is just enough and the emphasis is on small meals, little and often!
    With my condition, we do have to eat every three hours or we are risking going into hypo. It is not recommended to do otherwise.
    Also bear in mind that natural full fat will digest slower. But, that should not give you reason to stretch your meal times.
    You eat to stay away from hypos!
    Others like @Brunneria only have three meals a day.

    Enough of the reasons.
    It is quite simple.
    First testing on waking. If you need to know if dawn phenomenon is a problem, if yours isn't then no need.
    Before meal, pre prandial testing.
    to see what is called your pre meal fasting blood glucose level. This is one test that is completely necessary.
    Half an hour after first bite, post prandial testing.
    this test is to see if you spike really quick and will help on your hour test.
    The reason it is first bite, is because your body digestive reactions work that quickly and all your enzymes and food hormones work instantly including saliva.
    Once you have found your spike time, then this test is unnecessary.
    First hour test,
    The spike should be peaking by now and starting to come down. Everybody is different, so is our spiking.
    Once you know your spike time, only test if you haven't tested the food type you are eating.
    Two hour test. This is a necessary test.
    By now we should if there is nothing that has spiked us, be in normal range again, if not, there is a food or a combination of foods that have done this.
    If this is the case, you have to find out which one by testing and experimenting.

    Only if you want to find your hypo timing is it necessary to test further. You should only try this with someone who has knowledge of how to treat your hypo and it is supervised.

    The next thing you have to do is keep a food diary.
    You need to log all your test readings and timing throughout the day. Pre and post prandial tests. You need to log every bite of food and try and be as specific as possible, you shouldn't have to carb or calorie count, but there is nothing stopping you. If you do this properly you will see patterns and you can show your medical team your results.
    If you are in ketosis, the testing is to ensure you stay there and you see no spikes at all.
    To finish, we RH ers don't want to spike and testing ensures that something that we are eating doesn't do that. And some foods do contain hidden carbs and sugars. We have to be very wary and only natural food can we take for granted, even some meats and protein, have things done to them during production and processed food can be dangerous to stop you spiking.
    If you don't spike you don't hypo! Testing is so important and the need to is just as important!
    Hope this explains everything!
     
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  2. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Nosher,
    With R.H. it is absolutely necessary to monitor B.G. It is the only way we can keep our insulin production down and save our liver's from N.A.F.L.D.
    Had my best GGT since it was 143 a year ago..it is now 79 and has come down 5% in two weeks from 83.
    Carbohydrates are knackering livers.

    It is low carb for life, now...LC stopped exercise hypos as soon as I started proper LCHF.
    regards
    Derek
     
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    #2 lindisfel, Nov 26, 2015 at 1:55 PM
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 26, 2015
  3. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I totally agree, both me and the wife have had NAFL.
    Both on low carb, me lower! And the difference is remarkable, because of lessening insulin resistance and getting rid of the excess insulin we produce. No visceral fat, weight loss and less symptoms!

    It's them baddies again, yeah, knackering livers!!!!!
     
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  4. Linagirl

    Linagirl Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Hello you two does that mean fatty liver. I was told I had that two years ago but curiously it's been fine when tested since. My weight is coming off slowly. Went back to work today :)
     
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  5. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Yes, non alcoholic fatty liver!

    It has many causes including diet and insulin resistance and visceral fat. It has implications for weight gain and mainly liver function tests!

    So glad, you are able to do some work!
    How are you feeling now?
     
  6. Linagirl

    Linagirl Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I had a hard time at work today. I felt like everyone was looking at me. I for very tired mid morning and then perked up again after lunch but the first day is over. They are keeping stress away from me at the moment so that's good but my job is hard to do without stress as I am a residential conveyancer!!

    Btw I know your area well. My ex husband was born in Birkenhead and raised in Wallasey and I worked for Robert cains brewery in liverpoolmfor years!
     
  7. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Small world ain't it!
     
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  8. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Bet your glad you're back working though!
     
  9. Linagirl

    Linagirl Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Sure am! Concentration was a problem but hopefully each day will get easier x
     
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  10. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I have two blogs, that recount my childhood years, which contains a lot about the area in Wallasey, where I was dragged up!
    That would give you some memories of your ex's area!
     
  11. Linagirl

    Linagirl Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    I'll have a look. His family Nijs so not forgettable. Sadly his dad died young in an accident so he lost touch with that side of the family. But if I told you our first trip away together was to Leasowe Castle and we went into town for a pint of Cains you'll see he's very proud of his home :)
     
  12. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Too posh for me the castle!
    Only been once for a wedding, hated it!

    My dad lived as a kid in Moreton, he lived by the lighthouse, before the war in a stilted house because of the annual floods on the shore there, till they built the wall defences.
     
  13. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    From what I have read N.A.F.L.D. can be a precursor to liver cancer.
    regards
    Derek
     
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  14. Linagirl

    Linagirl Don't have diabetes · Well-Known Member

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    Davids family are from Moreton. Danger lane I think?
     
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  15. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Know of it! Not been there!
     
  16. Discovery22

    Discovery22 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi. I’ve only been diagnosed with rh today but know I’ve had it for many years. I guess what I’ve done wrong is I’ve only tested my blood when I’ve felt really dodgy....when I’m in complete hypo and have occasionally lost consciousness. I’ve avoided anything sweet for years, it’s a definate no-no unless I’ve had something carbs to stop the drop. However I still do get bad hypo’s without knowing what has caused them and sometimes my bloods going as low as 1.5. I will make a point of checking my levels more often now to see exactly where it’s going wrong
     
  17. lindisfel

    lindisfel · Well-Known Member

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    It is very counterintuitive.You can't stop the blood glucose roller coaster by having carbs, Discovery!
    If you have a hypo, come out it by very gradually eating a little carb to combat the excessive late insulin you produce.
    If you stop eating refined carbs. Re: bread, potatoes, rice etc. You will stop the highs and then stop the lows.
    I stopped my RH a few years ago when I stopped eating refined carbs and I immediately stopped having two hypos a day.
    regards
    Derek
     
    #17 lindisfel, Nov 16, 2018 at 9:34 PM
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2018
  18. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Hi and welcome to our forum,
    It's the carbs!
    If you have been diagnosed with RH, then we have an intolerance to certain foods, which have too many carbs.
    My intolerance is dairy, wheat, grains, rice, starchy vegetables especially potatoes, and anything that has sugar, or is over 5% (ish) carbs!
    These turn to glucose very quickly in my blood and spike high very quickly, this triggers an insulin response, which doesn't turn off, the outcome of too much insulin is the low blood glucose levels you are seeing on your glucometer.
    If I avoid the carbs, no trigger for insulin, no low blood levels.
    Apart from one, I have had only one hypo in over four years.

    Blood glucose monitoring is an experimental process to find out how your body and blood responds to certain foods. This must be done as to give you the information.
    Pre meal, one hour, two hour testing, even three hours, to discover what is happening at these times. Because we are non diabetic, we should have a pre meal reading in normal levels 4-6mmols. I like to keep my one hour reading below seven, two hours, back in normal levels. Anything above is risking an insulin overshoot.
    Because we metabolise food at different rates, this is only a guide, and also, if you eat more saturated fat with your meal, it might take longer to return to normal levels and lower your spike timing. Which is good.

    Keep asking questions and read our forum, the knowledge is invaluable and will probably have a dramatic effect on your health.
    Because the condition is still quite rare, the treatment or advice on how to treat it is very limited and most doctors don't understand how and why it happens. That is why our forum has grown so quickly in just a few years. Very low carb lifestyle works and we have had great success stories.
    It is a dietary condition, that is controlled by what you eat.

    Best wishes
     
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