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Book Corner.

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by Guzzler, Jul 4, 2017.

  1. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    I tried to read Cujo.

    I just finished Bill Bryson's One Summer. Now it's a toss-up between The Library At the End of the World by Felicity Hayes-McCoy and Jerusalem: The Biography by Simon Sebag Montefiore. I took a break in the middle of One Summer to read Daisy Newman's Diligence in Love.
     
  2. heh

    heh Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I read that too
     
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  3. wolfie11969

    wolfie11969 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I've just finished a re-titled book by Lucinda Riley called The Love Letter. Its set around how far the British secret service will go to protect state secrets.

    I'm now going to go back to London as I'm nearly done with that.

    What I move onto afterwards I have no idea as I have a bookshelf and a half filled with stuff I've bought. Oh the choices
     
  4. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    I gave up on the Montefiore "biography" of Jerusalem and laughed out loud reading The Road to Little Dribbling last night. On the Barnes & Noble website I found a series of spy novels called "Old Horses" or something like that but now I can't remember exactly. Do any of you know what series I mean?
     
  5. caroldvn

    caroldvn · Member

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    One of the best book I've ever read Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind by Yuval Noah Harari!!!
     
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  6. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    I have that on my shelf to read as soon as I feel better about reading during the day and not just in bed where I prefer my kindle. I also have another book by them to read, 21 lessons I think? I am very much looking forward to them.
     
  7. endocrinegremlin

    endocrinegremlin Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    If you ask goodreads I am reading 8 books at the moment but actively I am re-reading Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows and reallly really loving it. Just, going back to my childhood and relaxing and not having to think too much has been really great for me given how badly depression is trying to take me down these days.
     
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  8. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    I'm half way through 'Dark Light' by Jodi Taylor's new supernatural thriller!
    It is the second in the series after 'White Silence'.
     
  9. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    Once again I've started The Library at the Edge of the World and once again I'm wondering if I will keep struggling through it.

    @endocrinegremlin I need something that works for me like HP works for you. An old favorite horse story. Monica Edwards or Ruby Ferguson or Walter Farley.
     
  10. Goacher55

    Goacher55 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Just returned from holiday did a book swap so I’ve just finished a Lee Child
     
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  11. caroldvn

    caroldvn · Member

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    hope you'll be fine soon :)
    did you mean "21 Lessons for the 21st Century"?
     
  12. wolfie11969

    wolfie11969 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Reading An Outrageous Affair by Penny Vincenzi.

    Easy reading for the day
     
  13. dtennant9

    dtennant9 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Just been looking through all the diverse books that you are all reading.
    I switch between my kindle and physical books. Kinlde is great when we are away on holiday.
    I am currently reading Driftnet by Lin Anderson. First in a series of around 12 books and it is very interesting.
    Another I read lately was The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton which was an interesting read, although a bit strange in places.
     
  14. dtennant9

    dtennant9 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    My Wife also sells Usborne books so I end up being gifted or read books that she gets that are aimed at Young Adults.
    Some of the good series I have read or started are:
    Extinction Trials by S.M. Wilson
    Cogheart by Peter Bunzl
    A Place Called Perfect by Helen Duggan

    Not read yet but also got The Train to Impossible Places by P-G Bell to read which looks good.
     
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  15. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    Speaking of YA books, I've just finished rereading two of my favorites, Gone-Away Lake and Return to Gone-Away, by Elizabeth Enright.

    Gone-Away Lake is a Newbery Honor book and also a Lewis Carroll Shelf Award winner.
    On their first day exploring, Portia and Julian discover an enormous boulder with a mysterious message, a swamp choked with reeds and quicksand, and on the far side of the swamp...a ghost town. (goodreads.com)
     
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  16. dtennant9

    dtennant9 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

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    Some of the YA stuff is good.
     
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  17. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    I agree.

    The two I named, and lots and lots of other books, are free to read online at openlibrary.org.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  18. BillB

    BillB Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve just bought a book that set me on a train of thought going back quite a few years. I first became aware of it when it was broadcast on the BBC (I think it was on the Light Programme, which goes to show how old it is). I was only about 11 or 12 but it was on just after I got home from the Scouts on a Tuesday evening and I was completely absorbed by these characters and their stories. It’s called Sorrell and Son by Warren Deeping, first published in 1925.

    I found it in Greenwich Library when I was about 17 and enjoyed the book as much as on the radio. Basically, before the book begins the main character, Stephen Sorrell, a decorated former World War I officer has returned from the war, divorced his wife and is seeking a job to keep himself and his son, Christopher, so that he can give his son the best education he possibly can.

    I shan’t describe any more of the plot except to say that it describes an England in gentler, more innocent times, though that doesn’t mean he doesn’t encounter snobbery and experience hardships.

    The book is fascinating, absorbing and the characters seem so real that the reader begins to care about them..

    Another writer that captured me from the first few pages is R.F. Delderfield. I was first captivated by his 3 volume tale “A Horseman Riding By”, a tale of a soldier who returns home from the Boer War to recover from his injuries and inherits his father’s scrap metal business, something which doesn’t interest him in the slightest. Searching around for a purpose to his life he buys a large estate comprising a spacious valley in Devon. This and the subsequent two volumes in his story tells of rural Britain through the eyes and experiences of the valley’s inhabitants up to the death of Winston Churchill.

    Everybody to whom I’ve recommended these books have adored them, and then there are more stories - The Avenue, a two book tale of a South London suburb and its inhabitants from the ending of the First World War to the aftermath of the Second World War.

    Then there is To Serve Them All My Days, a novel of a young, idealistic teacher who begins work in a rural boarding school and details his life and experiences with the young men under his charge. These two volumes had me completely hooked from the first page.

    Finally there is the Swann saga, the tale of Adam Swann who founds a transport business (not dissimilar to the firm Carter Paterson) in mid-19th century Britain, how he develops it, how changing technology is coped with, how the Swann family work to make the company grow until its activities cover the entire country. It ends as the rumblings of World War 1 begin to be felt throughout Europe.

    There are three books in the series: God is an Englishman, Theirs was the Kingdom and Give us this Day. If you read all of Delderfield’s sagas you have a lot of absorbing and enjoyable reading ahead of you.
     
  19. SaskiaKC

    SaskiaKC Type 2 · Expert

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    To Serve Them All My Days is my favorite Delderfield. I have read it about 3 times and I also love the TV series. It was on PBS here, so maybe on the BBC or ITV there? It is also on YouTube.


    I think it was the first time I saw Frank Middlemass, whom I also loved in War and Peace and As Time Goes By.

    Another school story I love is Tom Brown's Schooldays, and its sequel, Tom Brown at Oxford. The former was also a really good TV series.

    If you like school stories you might love Owen Johnson's books set at the Lawrenceville School near Princeton, New Jersey, in the early 1900s. A movie was made based on them, The Happy Years.

    I am very glad to read about Warwick Deeping's Sorrell and Son. I will try to find a copy. I first saw it when I worked as a page at my local library but I haven't read it yet. It's nice to meet someone who has heard of it and read it. :)

    And here I was coming to this thread because I haven't been able to find anything good to read!
     
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  20. Lamont D

    Lamont D Reactive hypoglycemia · Master

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    Just downloaded 'Fatal Promise' by Angela Marsden.
    Book nine in the Kim Stone series.
    Also ordered number ten!
     
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