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BREAD?

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by MING, Aug 5, 2009.

  1. MING

    MING · Well-Known Member

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    As posted elsewhere on here, my husband was told by phone yesterday hes diabetic, type 2, also has pernicious anaemia and heart disease. I had thought home made bread would be ok in salad sandwiches & with home made soup - but reading in here it seems high in carbs. Is there any special kind of bread/flour that might be acceptable for him ?
     
  2. ChocFish

    ChocFish · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ming

    It all depends on how many carbs your husband can tolerate without getting spikes, that is where testing before and after meals comes in.
    Check on the nutrition information on the bread wrappers, some like Weight Watchers wholemeal or thin sliced wholemeal multigrain breads have lower carb content but still might be too much for your husband.

    You can purchase low carb bread, our Fergus (moderator) has brought one of those onto the market, you need to send him a PM and ask for details, you can also buy low carb bread from the low carb megastore http://www.lowcarbmegastore.co.uk or http://www.avidlite.co.uk, you can also purchase lower carb flour from these stores.

    I note from your other posts that your husband has had some complications, but you know there is plenty of hope that if he manages to achieve good control over his diabetes and his bg numbers within non-diabetic levels he can reverse or at least stabilise his conditions (do read the success stories, there is lots of inspiration there).

    Have you got hold of the Collins Little Gem Carb Counter book, its only small but ever so useful when you go out shopping and devising meals, etc reducing carbs in the diet is really very flexible, it all depends on the individual and is trial and error in the beginning, do keep a food diary and write down his readings too. Cut out transfats from your diet, eat lots of healthy low/medium carb vegetables, low carb fruit such as berries, make sure you get all the good oils, eg fish oils, olive oil, flax seed oil, etc, nuts, if you cant chew them or bits go between your teeth, just grind them.

    Also get hold of the book, Dr Charles Clarke The Diabetes Revolution, its very easy to read and will give you insight, there are other really good books around, but these two are a really good start.
    The Diabetes Revolution is easy to read, I finished mine in just a few hours.


    And I know you worry very much about your husband, but you know reducing carbs is a good and healthy thing to do for everyone whether diabetic or not, bread, pasta, cereal, rice, potatoes, etc have very little nutritional value, the are just mainly fillers.

    All the best to you and husband

    Karen
     
  3. Spiral

    Spiral · Well-Known Member

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    Before I cut it out altogether I started eating heavy rye bread, rye crispbread and oatcakes. I think I have seen things about some people managing with bread that says it is low GI loaf - I recall my sister in law bought it for me when stayed with them over easter, it was nice, lots of seeds, quite tasty.

    I will try to reintroduce these bread abd rice when I get considerably closer to where I want to be weight-wise and control-wise and find out what impact they have when my insulin resistance is lower.

    Seriously, bread just isn't good for us. The starch all turns to glucose in our systems and that is what sends the blood sugar up. I really miss toast (white farmhouse, evenly toasted to a golden brown still warm and crisp with butter and Marmite driping from it :cry: ), but that is the only thing I really miss since I started low carbing.

    Some people get away with some forms of bread. It really depends on the individual and testing to find out what happens to your blood sugar after you eat it - my biggest spikes are at around 1 hour after I eat. Your husband needs to test to find out what happens in his body.

    Also, he needs to be with the progam himself. He needs to make a commitment to making dietary changes, because you are not with him 24/7 and he needs to eat when you are not around. Supportive family and friends make a huge difference to being able to stick to a diet, but most of the work has to be done my the diabetic.

    My focus when I was a very newly diagnosed diabetic was to carry on eating what I thought was a healthy diet (the NHS health low fat plate with all those carbs) and simply cut out added sugar to anything and sweet treets and adding fresh and raw, I wanted a lower reading at the next blood test. This approach alone brought my fasting numbers down by about 2 points at the tests the surgery was doing.

    While I was pleased the readings were lower I was quite surprised it wasn't even lower because I thought I'd worked quite hard.

    It wasn't until I started testing that I really found out what I could eat without unacceptable spikes.
     
  4. Romola

    Romola · Well-Known Member

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    Portion control is important here too.
     
  5. MING

    MING · Well-Known Member

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    Ok once again thank you ! I'll get after a copy of the Collins carb book, and order this special flour.
    If I was well myself then I could get this all organised easily, but the way I feel just now it's hard going. I haven't a clue how to get lots of veg into him, Dono where to start.
    He will be strict with his diet once we sort it out - he's a very fussy virgo who pays attention to detail - not like moi :mrgreen:
    Sorry for being such a whine, but right now I'm too flattened to do this well. Hopefully will feel better soon & roll sleeves up and deal with it !
     
  6. Reetpetite

    Reetpetite Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Hi Ming,

    I think you are coping very well - after all its only been a few days since your husband was diagnosed.

    I was diagnosed at the end of May and there is a lot to take in and get your head around so I do understand the confusion around diet etc. - but you must also remember to look after yourself as well as your husband and don't beat yourself up when understanding doesn't come as easily as you hope - I'm still confused about lots of things but the people here on this forum are great and very supportive and don't mind you asking all sorts of questions - however, silly you may think they sound.

    I took the advice of many people here and started low-carbing and my numbers have come down dramatically - there is still a way to go but I am pleased with what I have achieved so far - it works for me.

    I have Fergus's bread and also use Carbalose and Carbquick flour from the Lowcarbmegastore - there is a link in a previous post. It's expensive but I've made several things recently including scones and cheese biscuits which are lovely - so your husband can still have some treats if he wants.

    Please remember though to take care of yourself - best wishes to you and your husband.

    Rita
     
  7. ChocFish

    ChocFish · Well-Known Member

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    Lovely post Rita/Reetpetite

    Ming, yes you must look after yourself too, and also your husband should take responsibility he is the one with the condition, and really should not leave it all to you.
    Why are you worried about not getting vegetables down him? Does he not like to eat them? I know Virgo's are fussy eaters, I am one of those too; I know a few people that dont like vegetables all that much, but I have converted many by getting them to eat vegetable mash, just pick a few of the low carb veggies, steam or microwave (but with only very little water), then use a stick blender to mash them all up, season with salt, pepper, grating of nutmeg and a decent knob of butter, its lovely and creamy and was really good for me because I missed my mashed potatoes so much. Sometimes I sprinkle seeds on top of a pile of veggie mash, eg sesame and sunflower to add extra goodness. You can top shepherds/cottage pie with vegetable mash too, experiment.
    Some other suggestions to get veggies down him:
    Instead of rice, you can do cauliflower rice, you grate a raw cauliflower, I use the grating disc in my food processor because I am too lazy to do this by hand, then cook in the microwave, covered, but no water added, just the 'rice grains alone' season it with salt, pepper, butter and a couple of sprinkles of Maggi liquid seasoning, its very nice you know and good for everyone.
    Or if we are having curry I soften half a finely chopped onion, a bay leaf, couple of cardamom pods and a bit of cassia bark or cinnamon stick, do this really slowly so it doesnt burn, and until the onion is golden, slightly brown at the edges, then stir in your cauliflower rice and its ready, it really does make a very acceptable pilau rice, even non diabetic friends and family like it, esp since its a good way of increasing vegetable intake.
    Alternative to chips, cut pumpkin, aubergine***, celeriac (use other veg if you like) into thick chips, toss in oil, you can use coconut oil if you want, then ovenbake till golden, season with salt, paprika, whatever you fancy.

    Your husband should work with you as a team, do this meal planning together, its something new to do isnt it and probably fun too.

    I hope that you feel better soon.

    Karen

    *** slice the aubergine, then sprinkle with salt, put in a colander and place a plate and something heavy on top, I use a kettle full of water, to weigh the plate down, leave for an hour so the bitter juices run out, then rinse, toss in oil and ovenbake til they are crispy outside and soft and creamy inside, lovely!
     
  8. MING

    MING · Well-Known Member

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    :mrgreen: I have a wee notebook and am writing this down. But I'm not a cook at all - been married 43 years and I still hate cooking :evil: I dont use aubergine, never heard of celeriac, and we don't eat curries.... Like the idea of a shepherds pie with mashed veg on top though :mrgreen:
     
  9. ChocFish

    ChocFish · Well-Known Member

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    Ah! Not a cook then, hmmmm, a diabetic diagnosis, heart attacks are your bodies telling you to make some changes to your lifestyles and on top of that you are missing out on so many lovely dishes; I hope you decide to try something different, do it gradually, you and hubby can cook things together, you probably have lots of fun doing so, also check out this book it is also by Dr Charles Clarke http://www.amazon.co.uk/High-Protein-He ... 93-3185852 and reduced price at the moment.

    Karen
     
  10. MING

    MING · Well-Known Member

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    Just ordered that plus the Collins Gem one. Getting ready to fight back whoohoo ! :mrgreen:
     
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