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Can My GP Mark My Diabetes As “In Remission” If I Don’t Agree?

Discussion in 'Type 2 Diabetes' started by Eurobuff, Sep 17, 2020.

  1. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Because of coronavirus my diabetes review is on hold, but I’ve noticed that my GP has put on my notes to speak with me once reviews are back on to put my diabetes (type 2) as in remission. My question is can he do this if I don’t agree/accept it? I am on a low carb diet, so my control is good, but I do get highs and more importantly I do get lows. Probably more lows than highs. They are “genuine” lows as I do get dizzy etc. I suspect that as the hba1c is an average, this is giving me the “non diabetic” results (40, 42, 36 mmol).

    I know this is probably a cost saving exercise on his part. I am on a (non diabetic) tablet which causes the lows. So I am also prescribed test strips and a meter. He mentioned previously about trying to stop the tablet then he wouldn’t need to prescribe the test strips as well. My line of thinking now is that if he puts my diabetes as “in remission” then he will be able to stop the test strips as I’m “not diabetic”?
     
  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    I believe they probably can, else we'd have lots of people who wouldn't have their T2 (or other conditions) noted, due to denial, not wanting "it" on their records, or whatever.

    Regarding your meter and strips; if the lows you experience are due to medication you take for something non-diabetes, then provided that medication were to continue, I can't see your GP could rationally de-prescribe your strips. I am assuming that for those with diabetes, but taking that tablet, they would have to monitor their bloods?

    Of course, I'm not your GP, so I'm sort of second-guessing a though process.
     
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  3. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My line of thinking was that the tablet I am taking can give you lows if you are diabetic. So, if he puts me in the “in remission” category, then will his next step be to withdraw the test strips as I am “in remission” so not diabetic on record?
     
  4. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    I can see how that could happen.

    Is the tablet you take known to cause lows? I'm a bit confused why you feel your strips would be withdrawn, if these lows are likely to continue. What sort of lows do you see?
     
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  5. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    It’s listed in the side effects sheet. The lows I get are 3.2, 3.8, 3.9. I had to fight to get the test strips originally as their stance was you don’t need to test if you’re type 2. I am also diet controlled. I just think there must be an ulterior motive. My notes say “patient has diabetes in remission, discuss at next review, still needs monitoring at present”. It’s the “at present” part that’s making my mind work overtime.
     
  6. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Master
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    My medical record has the status "Diabetes Resolved", since the end of 2014. I still receive an annual A1c (result in today, curiously enough), still have annual eye screening. I only ever once had my feet checked, although as a matter of personal "housekeeping" I check them myself (accepting the sensitivity test can't really be self-administered properly).

    To be honest, the numbers you quote, whilst uncomfortable for you are not medically concerning hypos, bearing in mind you are diet controlled.

    I regularly see those numbers, and feel fine. At the 3.2, and under, I'd likely be hungry and due to eat, but I don't "treat" then in the way a T1, or someone on hypoglycaemic drugs would. I just either wait for my meal, if it is very close to ready, or have a cup of tea, with some milk in it.

    My challenge to you would be, if you take no meds and are diet controlled, how do you know it is the meds making you low, and not just your system becoming more efficient?
     
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  7. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I’ve heard that some people have lows but feel perfectly ok. When I have numbers like that I feel dizzy shaky. I go off balance and feel exhausted trying to get to the kitchen for food (which is only the next room, I don’t live in a mansion!) . I am assuming that it’s my blood sugar lows making me feel like that.
     
  8. Sparklebrightisright62

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    Hi Eurobuff,

    Which tablet are you on that causes lows.

    Sparklebright62.
     
  9. Eurobuff

    Eurobuff Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Nortriptiline
     
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