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Can we have something good to say about our NHS?

Discussion in 'Diabetes Soapbox - Have Your Say' started by helensaramay, Aug 31, 2017.

  1. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Diabetics should have a Medical Exemption certificate for prescriptions
     
  2. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
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    Only those taking prescribed medication for diabetes are exempt, so those who are diet only don't qualify.
     
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  3. DCUKMod

    DCUKMod I reversed my Type 2 · Expert
    Staff Member Administrator

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    Sometimes things happen that bring our good fortune into sharp focus.

    Relatively recently, friends of ours who now live overseas (where the health care arrangements are pretty much like in the US) broke their ties with the UK, as they had no intention of returning to live here.

    A couple of months ago, he started having a few problems, and saw a Doc, which led to lots of tests (with their accompanying bills) and eventually a diagnosis of the Big C.

    His diagnosis cost him US$30,000, and now they're gathering their available funds for his surgery and associated treatment. Thus far he has paid for the very small tip of what could be a gigantic iceberg.

    In UK, we rock up to our Doc, see someone within 2 weeks (If the Big C may be suspected), then move forward to treatment. At no stage are we required to put our hands into our pockets, save for perhaps the odd prescription.

    Our system is a long, long, long way off perfect, but our friends' lives have become exceedingly emotionally uncomfortable of late and their financial situation may soon mirror that discomfiture. In their situation dealing with the diagnosis and prospective treatment is enough, without having to continually worry about how to pay.

    Curiously, they're now considering that repatriating to the UK might be in the longer term picture after all.
     
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  4. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Actually, most of us don't pay prescription charges. There are many more people exempt than not exempt.. Only 10% need to pay. http://digital.nhs.uk/catalogue/PUB17644

    From 2004 to 2014:
    • 89.9 per cent of all prescription items were dispensed free of charge, with 60.0 per cent dispensed free to patients claiming age exemption (aged 60 and over).
    @DCUKMod for info only - I believe cancer patients no longer pay for prescriptions.
     
  5. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    Diet only dont get free prescriptions. I have never been able to get free prescriptions at any time. We get free prescriptions in Wales but when I go to England to get medical treatment, which is most of the time due to where the services are fferred, i have to pay for my prescriptions. And for my opticians except the retinopthy test.
     
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  6. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    this is changing as Universal Credit new rules are being rolled out.
     
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  7. lowedb

    lowedb Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Well you are entitled to free NHS eye tests, not just retinopathy:
    https://www.nhs.uk/chq/Pages/895.aspx?CategoryID=68
    You are right about no free prescriptions for diet only control, though.
     
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  8. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Not retinopathy? They are free annually from the National Screening Service
     
  9. serenity648

    serenity648 · Guest

    not just retinopathy. I think maybe you speed read @lowedb 's post? In other words, not only retinopathy.

    I had no idea, and have recently paid for an eye test at the local opticians, despite telling them i am diabetic, so will be popping in next week to find out why they charged me. Thanks @lowedb for that info.
     
  10. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Guilty as charged! My apologies. :banghead:
     
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  11. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    Sorry. That's what I meant.
     
  12. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I remember that as a line Ministers came up with every time they increased them.
    To which the obvious reply was, well why are you increasing charges if is doesn't raise more revenue?
     
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  13. Squire Fulwood

    Squire Fulwood Type 2 · Expert

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    On balance I like the NHS. It's like a Mum you go to when your finger hurts. You walk in and they do their best to fix you even if they have not been trained to do so.

    Since I am a diabetic I think the biggest problem the NHS has in that regard is that they have to follow N.I.C.E. recommendations, but that brings on a conundrum. If they don't follow those then who do they follow? There are a large number of conditions I have no knowledge of so I can't judge those. Maybe N.I.C.E. are doing better with those.

    I like the NHS but I think that N.I.C.E. needs to keep up.
     
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    #113 Squire Fulwood, Oct 21, 2017 at 5:08 PM
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2017
  14. Bluetit1802

    Bluetit1802 Type 2 (in remission!) · Guru

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    Other than dietary advice, the NHS has never let me down and has saved my life a couple of times. We all ought to be far more grateful we have it.
     
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  15. Ymdawd

    Ymdawd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    On the subject of prescription charges I believe that there should be a nominal charge of say 50p or a £1 per item which EVERYBODY pays regardless of what conditions with no exemptions at all. At a stroke this would stop all the fraud and cheating that goes on. It might also reduce a lot of the enormous wastage that goes on too

    Ymdawd
    ( getting my asbestos pants on )
     
  16. Ymdawd

    Ymdawd Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    They could follow the Scottish SIGN guidelines instead. Does not really matter as both are ignored anyway. Good example is SIGN guideline 55 which deals with Diabetes. One of the recommendations is that all newly diagnosed diabetics should be counselled for depression. Did I get any counselling from my GP.? Did I h*ll.? If doctors cannot agree upon and implement best practice what hope is there for the rest of us.?
     
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  17. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    No need. I would suggest that that might cost more in administration than it raises in revenue though. Maybe we could put that imaginary £350m a week saving from the EU towards prescription charges.
     
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  18. dbr10

    dbr10 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    My doctors CAUSED my depression.
     
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  19. cott97

    cott97 Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    I actually like the French and other European systems where you pay a small amount when you see your GP. I really do believe that if everyone had to pay £5 for a GP consultation the problems with appointments would disappear overnight. Somewhere along the line we have forgotten how to self manage, though people on this site do tend to be different from the average patient. At Christmas I keep begging my GPs to only offer patients the antibiotic that makes you really ill if you drink alcohol - so many people turn up demanding treatment because they don't want xxxxx ruined due to a self limiting illness. The clue is in the name unless you have an underlying condition or are very young or elderly most colds, flu, sore throats etc are short term though granted very uncomfortable. They don't need medical intervention. Rant over. I am always grateful for the NHS particularly when taken ill in USA and have to hand over a credit card before I even join the queue.
     
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  20. poshtotty

    poshtotty Type 2 · Well-Known Member

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    This thread was started at a time when my youngest daughter (an adult) was in hospital some 70 miles away, and I've followed the thread with interest. My daughter's op was routine and she had asked for only 3 days off work, having initially been told by her surgeon that she'd be discharged the same day. In fact she was discharged 3 days later but the following week was readmitted to our nearest hospital via A & E after complications from the surgery occurred.

    I stayed with her on the ward on the day she was admitted and when none of the ward staff could resolve the problem, they telephoned her consultant who had finished for the day, who having had the symptoms and situation described to her, turned out from her home, leaving her husband and family, and arrived at my daughter's bedside at midnight, having telephoned ahead to make sure an operating theatre was available to her should she decide to operate.

    In the end she decided to postpone operating until the following day so that she could speak with the original surgeon 70 miles away. I left the ward at 1.30am, - the same time as the consultant, who very kindly walked me back to my car in the car park to make sure I got back to it safely.

    My daughter remained in hospital the second time for 3 weeks and had the best care possible. When she was eventually discharged we had daily visits from district nurses (which are still ongoing) On one occasion 2 of the district nurses made their visit together at 11.10 at night. When I asked if we were their last call of the day, they told me no, they would be working through the night as it is the only way to cover their case loads.

    I and my family have the utmost respect and gratitude for the NHS
     
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