1. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Guest, we'd love to know what you think about the forum! Take the Diabetes Forum Survey 2021 »
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Diabetes Forum should not be used in an emergency and does not replace your healthcare professional relationship. Posts can be seen by the public.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Guest, stay home, stay safe, save the NHS. Stay up to date with information about keeping yourself and people around you safe here and GOV.UK: Coronavirus (COVID-19). Think you have symptoms? NHS 111 service is available here.
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community »

car insurance

Discussion in 'Ask A Question' started by ebony321, Mar 6, 2010.

  1. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi all,

    can anyone tell me if i have a 3 year restricted licence, car insurance companies can rightfully charge me more than if i had no restrictions?

    thanks :)
     
  2. Brava210

    Brava210 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    88
    No. if you have a licence then you have a licence...if they charge more go somewhere else

    Gary
     
  3. 999sugarbabe

    999sugarbabe · Guest

    Messages:
    0
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi, ebony321,

    Sorry, but I (slightly) disagree with Brava 210 's advice.

    An insurance company may penalise you for a medical condition and/or impose conditions on your policy, depending on the condition, its severity and any added risks it incurs. They can refuse to insure you altogether if they consider the risks too great.

    Failure to notify them of your condition would almost definitely invalidate your insurance in event of a claim.

    Insurance companies talk to one another, but it is always worth shopping around. But do not hide information if they ask for it.

    Dependant upon your particular medical condition your G.P. is legally obliged to notify the DVLA.

    Also ebony 321, you didn't say which country you reside in, so I have assumed it to be the UK.
     
  4. leadingjo

    leadingjo Type 2 · Active Member

    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    46
    Insurance companies are not allowed to charge you more if you have diabetes and are on a restricted licience. you can test the theory as I do get a quote! then get a quote telling then about the diabetes and restricted licience the premium will not change!
     
  5. Sid Bonkers

    Sid Bonkers Type 2 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,976
    Likes Received:
    1,102
    Trophy Points:
    178
    All I can add is that when I went onto insulin I was told I had to tell the DVLA and my insurance company, the DVLA were a royal pain to deal with but my insurance company couldnt have cared less, they told me they would make a note on my policy and that was it, made no difference to my premium.

    My insurance company offer good cover and are cheap too, they advertise with a cartoon bulldog :D
     
  6. nannybarbara

    nannybarbara · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    100
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    36
    I'm with Sid on this one - the insurance company were fine - DVLA - pah!

    Incidentally, we've got travel insurance that comes with our bank account, and I phoned them on Thursday to tell them I'm on insulin, and they didn't seem to care either!
     
  7. kegstore

    kegstore · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    771
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    38
    As I was already diabetic when I applied for my first licence, I can't really comment on how much worse DVLA are when informing them of diabetes, but they've always seemed pretty rubbish to me. It was always a series of hoops I was required to jump through every 3 years.

    Insurance companies don't care from an underwriting perspective - they're not allowed to - and often don't even ask. This is the key, if they DO ask you MUST answer truthfully otherwise your policy is invalid. Then you're in BIG trouble!
     
  8. Brava210

    Brava210 Type 1 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    139
    Likes Received:
    52
    Trophy Points:
    88
    I have been reliant on driving etc since diagnosed as most of us are..
    The rules are as I have been told by tthe Insurers governing body.

    If the DVLA have issued you with a Licence then you are FIT to drive and are no greater risk than anybody else......If anything I think less as we tend to take more care of our health than a lot of the ticking time bombs that are allowed to drive around on our roads.

    I am on a 1 year Licence as I always apply for c1+e as well.
    I was once charged more insurance for being type 1, so I went elsewhere, SIMPLES :D

    I was also refused a job on medical grounds as an AA patrol :evil: which I fought and won..
    But that's another story
     
  9. ebony321

    ebony321 · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    24
    Trophy Points:
    58
    Hi,

    thanks for all your replies!

    i didnt think they were allowed to...

    im also aware cant lie, and wouldnt even dare!!

    i opened a compare website in two different tabs and filled in all info apart from one was with a 3yr retriced licence and one without any and there was a difference from around £50-£200!!! but all different insurance companies,

    i'm not driving yet as i've only just finished a year long battle with the dvla to get them to see im perfectly fine to drive!

    i was almost ready to book my test before i got diagnosed last jan, and wod havecontinued as you can still drive but he dvla 'didnt receive my questionaire on time' and revoked my provisional and i've been fighting it since last week!!

    so i was looking at cars and insurance and thats when i posted on here to see what everyone else did with insurance and if i was likely to get charged more, i guess its different applying rather than rewnewing with diabetes and driving as i carry no greater risk than anyone else whilst driving and will definately fight my corner for a fair deall :lol:

    so thanks alot guys :)
     
  10. Assimilator1

    Assimilator1 · Active Member

    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    21
    I once had an insurance company ask me how much insulin I took each day!
    Wth's that got to do with it??

    Brava
    A mate of mine's an AA patrol man, he once asked why I didn't do it. I replied that my diabetes would get in the way too much (apart from I would hate the hours! ;)), having to stop to eat at specific times not to mention hypos. How do you deal with that??
     
  11. jopar

    jopar · Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,222
    Likes Received:
    104
    Trophy Points:
    83
    In theory it's ilegal for a insurance company to load an excees due to your diabetes... But as always insurance companies will have ways and means to get around this little legality...

    My insurance was due back in March, so I did the comparison via the net, it compared over 30 different companies... And the results made the mind boggle indeed :shock:

    Fully comprehensive insurance..

    Range from the £195 (several choices of companies) right up to one that quoted £986 :shock: :shock:

    What it actually means, Every insurance company will know what type and who they are willing to insurance.. So they build their calcualting system to match creating a pricing system that loads the unwanted drivers...

    I had for a couple of years my oldest daughter as a named driver on my insurance, even when she was a learner, the load was resoable, extra £200 she was only 19-22 so pretty good... (for a 17L turbo engined car) we were quite shocked when my company quoted her for her first car... (smaller none turbo engine) £2000 which suspposed to have included discount due to being named on my insurance :shock: Needless to say she choose another company who offered the same protection (with out any discounts) for £1100..
     
  • Meet the Community

    Find support, connect with others, ask questions and share your experiences with people with diabetes, their carers and family.

    Did you know: 7 out of 10 people improve their understanding of diabetes within 6 months of being a Diabetes Forum member. Get the Diabetes Forum App and stay connected on iOS and Android

    Grab the app!
  • Tweet with us

  • Like us on Facebook